Dudley Ryder (judge)

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Dudley Ryder Dudley Ryder after J Cranke.jpg
Dudley Ryder

Sir Dudley Ryder PC (4 November 1691 25 May 1756), of Tooting Surrey, was a British lawyer, diarist and politician, who sat in the House of Commons from 1733 until 1754 when he was appointed Chief Justice of the King's Bench.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, commonly known as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or simply the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Contents

Early life

Ryder was the second son of Richard Ryder, a draper of Hackney, Middlesex, and his second wife Elizabeth Marshall, daughter of William Marshall of Lincoln’s Inn. He studied at a dissenting academy in Hackney and the University of Edinburgh, Scotland and Leiden University in The Netherlands. He went to the Middle Temple in 1713 (where he kept a diary from 1715–16, in which he minutely recorded “whatever occurs to me in the day worth observing”). In 1719, he was called to the Bar. He married Anne Newnham, daughter of Nathaniel Newnham of Streatham, Surrey in November 1733. [1]

Hackney (parish) parish in the historic county of Middlesex

Hackney was a parish in the historic county of Middlesex. The parish church of St John-at-Hackney was built in 1789, replacing the nearby former 16th-century parish church dedicated to St Augustine. The original tower of that church was retained to hold the bells until the new church could be strengthened; the bells were finally removed to the new St John's in 1854. See details of other, more modern, churches within the original parish boundaries below.

University of Edinburgh public research university in Edinburgh, Scotland

The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582, is the sixth oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's ancient universities. The university has five main campuses in the city of Edinburgh, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university. The university played an important role in leading Edinburgh to its reputation as a chief intellectual centre during the Age of Enlightenment, and helped give the city the nickname of the Athens of the North.

Leiden University university in the Netherlands

Leiden University is a public research university in Leiden, Netherlands. Founded in 1575 by William, Prince of Orange; leader of the Dutch Revolt in the Eighty Years' War; as a reward to the town of Leiden for its defense against Spanish attacks, it is the oldest institution of higher education in the Netherlands, and the twelfth-oldest in Europe.

Career

Ryder was returned as Member of Parliament for St Germans at a by election on 1 March 1733. He was also made Solicitor General by Sir Robert Walpole in 1733. At the 1734 British general election, he switched to Tiverton where he was returned unopposed as MP. He was appointed as Attorney General in 1737. At the creation of the Foundling Hospital in London in 1739 he was one of the founding governors. In 1740, he was knighted. [2] He topped the poll in a contest at the 1741 British general election and was returned unopposed again in 1747. On 2 May 1754 he was made a Privy Councillor and Chief Justice of the King's Bench, a post he held until his death. He did not stand for parliament at the 1754 general election. The King refused his application for a peerage until he had served in office for two years. A patent creating him a peer was signed by the King on 24 May 1756, but Ryder died the following day and was in no position to kiss hands to take it up. [1]

St Germans was a rotten borough in Cornwall which returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons in the English and later British Parliament from 1562 to 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Solicitor General for England and Wales one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Attorney General

Her Majesty's Solicitor General for England and Wales, known informally as the Solicitor General, is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Attorney General, whose duty is to advise the Crown and Cabinet on the law. He or she can exercise the powers of the Attorney General in the Attorney General's absence.

Robert Walpole British statesman and art collector, 1st Earl of Orford, First Lord of the Treasury

Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford,, known between 1725 and 1742 as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British politician who is generally regarded as the de facto first Prime Minister of Great Britain.

Horace Walpole thought Ryder "a man of singular goodness and integrity; of the highest reputation in his profession, of the lowest in the House, where he wearied the audience by the multiplicity of his arguments; resembling the physician who ordered a medicine to be composed of all the simples in a meadow, as there must be some of them at least that would be proper". [3]

Ryder died leaving one son Nathaniel who became Baron Harrowby.

Nathaniel Ryder, 1st Baron Harrowby was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1756 to 1776 when he was raised to the peerage as Baron Harrowby.

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References

Notes

  1. 1 2 "RYDER, Dudley (1691-1756), of Tooting, Surr". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  2. "No. 7909". The London Gazette . 10 May 1740. p. 2.
  3. Horace Walpole, Memoirs of King George II: Volume I (Yale, 1985), p. 83.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Sir Gilbert Heathcote, Bt
James Nelthorpe
Member of Parliament for St Germans
17331734
With: Richard Eliot
Succeeded by
The Lord Baltimore
Charles Montagu
Preceded by
Arthur Arscott
James Nelthorpe
Member of Parliament for Tiverton
17341754
With: Arthur Arscott 1734–1747
Sir William Yonge, Bt 1747
Henry Conyngham 1747–1754
Succeeded by
Sir William Yonge, Bt
Henry Pelham
Legal offices
Preceded by
Charles Talbot
Solicitor General
17331737
Succeeded by
John Strange
Preceded by
Sir John Willes
Attorney General
17371754
Succeeded by
William Murray
Preceded by
William Lee
Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench
17541756