Duke of Buccleuch

Last updated

Dukedom of Buccleuch
held with
Dukedom of Queensberry
Coronet of a British Duke.svg
Duke of Buccleuch arms.svg
Creation date1663
Monarch Charles II
Peerage Peerage of Scotland
First holder James Scott
Present holder Richard Scott, 10th Duke
Heir apparent Walter Scott, Earl of Dalkeith
Remainder tothe 1st Duke's heirs male of the body lawfully begotten
Subsidiary titlesMarquess of Dumfriesshire
Earl of Buccleuch
Earl of Dalkeith
Earl of Doncaster
Earl of Drumlanrig and Sanquhar
Viscount of Nith, Tortholwald and Ross
Baron Scott of Tindale
Lord Scott of Buccleuch
Lord Scott of Whitchester and Eskdaill
Lord Douglas of Kilmount, Middlebie and Dornock
Seat(s) Bowhill House
Drumlanrig Castle
Boughton House
Former seat(s) Dalkeith Palace*
Montagu House
MottoAmo ("I love") [1]
*Dalkeith Palace remains in the ownership of the Dukes, but is not presently inhabited by them or their family.

The title Duke of Buccleuch /bəˈkl/ , formerly also spelt Duke of Buccleugh, is a title in the Peerage of Scotland created twice on 20 April 1663, first for James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth and second suo jure for his wife Anne Scott, 4th Countess of Buccleuch. Monmouth, the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II was attainted after his 1685 rebellion, but his wife's title was unaffected and passed on to their descendants, who have successively borne the surnames Scott, Montagu-Scott, Montagu Douglas Scott and Scott again. In 1810, the 3rd Duke of Buccleuch inherited the Dukedom of Queensberry , also in the Peerage of Scotland, thus separating that title from the Marquessate of Queensberry.

The Peerage of Scotland is the section of the Peerage of the British Isles for those peers created by the King of Scots before 1707. Following that year's Treaty of Union, the Kingdom of Scots and the Kingdom of England were combined under the name of Great Britain, and a new Peerage of Great Britain was introduced in which subsequent titles were created.

James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth English nobleman and soldier

James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch, KG, PC was a Dutch-born English nobleman. Originally called James Crofts or James Fitzroy, he was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and his mistress Lucy Walter.

Suo jure is a Latin phrase, used in English to mean "in his/her own right".

Contents

The substantial origin of the ducal house of the Scotts of Buccleuch dates back to the large grants of lands in Scotland to Sir Walter Scott of Kirkurd and Buccleuch, a border chief, by James II, in consequence of the fall of William Douglas, 8th Earl of Douglas (1452), but the family traced their descent back to a Sir Richard le Scott (1240–1285). Sir Walter Scott of Branxholme and Buccleuch (died 1552) distinguished himself at the Battle of Pinkie Cleugh (1547). His great-grandson Sir Walter was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1606. [2]

Scotland Country in Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Sharing a border with England to the southeast, Scotland is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and the North Channel to the southwest. In addition to the mainland, situated on the northern third of the island of Great Britain, Scotland has over 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

James II of Scotland Scottish king

James II was a member of the House of Stewart who reigned as King of Scotland from 1437 until his death.

William Douglas, 8th Earl of Douglas, 2nd Earl of Avondale was a late Medieval Scottish nobleman, Lord of Galloway, and Lord of the Regality of Lauderdale, and the most powerful magnate in Southern Scotland.

Other subsidiary titles associated with the Dukedom of Buccleuch are: Earl of Buccleuch (1619), Earl of Dalkeith (1663) and Lord Scott of Whitchester and Eskdaill (1619) (all in the Peerage of Scotland). The Duke also holds the two subsidiary titles of the attainted Dukedom of Monmouth, namely Earl of Doncaster (1663) and Baron Scott of Tindale (1663) (both in the Peerage of England), and several subsidiary titles associated with the Dukedom of Queensberry, namely Marquess of Dumfriesshire (1683), Earl of Drumlanrig and Sanquhar (1682), Viscount of Nith, Tortholwald and Ross (1682) and Lord Douglas of Kilmount, Middlebie and Dornock (1682) (all in the Peerage of Scotland). The Earldom of Doncaster and Barony of Scott of Tindale had been forfeit at the time of the first Duke's attainder, but the titles were restored to the 2nd Duke of Buccleuch in 1742. Until 1835, the Dukes also held lands in the West Riding of Yorkshire and the ancient title of Lord of Bowland. The Duke of Buccleuch is the hereditary chief of Clan Scott. [3] The holder is one of only five people in the UK to hold two or more different dukedoms, the others being the Duke of Cornwall and Rothesay, the Duke of Hamilton and Brandon, the Duke of Argyll (who holds two dukedoms named Argyll), and the Duke of Richmond, Lennox and Gordon.

Scottish clan chief

The Scottish Gaelic word clann means children. In early times, and possibly even today, Scottish clan members believed themselves to descend from a common ancestor, the founder of the clan, after whom the clan is named. The clan chief is the representative of this founder, and represents the clan. In the Scottish clan system, a chief is greater than a chieftain, a designation applied to heads of branches of a clan. Scottish clans that no longer have a clan chief are referred to as armigerous clans.

Clan Scott clan

Clan Scott is a Scottish clan and is recognised as such by the Lord Lyon King of Arms. Historically the clan was based in the Scottish Borders.

Duke of Cornwall title in the Peerage of England

Duke of Cornwall is a title in the Peerage of England, traditionally held by the eldest son of the reigning British monarch, previously the English monarch. The Duchy of Cornwall was the first duchy created in England and was established by a royal charter in 1337. The present duke is the Prince of Wales, the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II. His wife, Camilla, is the current Duchess of Cornwall.

The courtesy title used by the Duke's eldest son and heir is Earl of Dalkeith; and that of Lord Dalkeith's eldest son and heir is Lord Eskdaill.

A courtesy title is a title that does not have legal significance but rather is used through custom or courtesy, particularly, in the context of nobility, the titles used by children of members of the nobility.

The novelist Sir Walter Scott, Bart., was directly descended of the Lords of Buccleuch. His family history, fancifully interpreted, is the main subject of much of The Lay of the Last Minstrel .

Walter Scott 18th/19th-century Scottish historical novelist, poet and playwright

Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet was a Scottish historical novelist, poet, playwright and historian. Many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature. Famous titles include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, Old Mortality, The Lady of the Lake, Waverley, The Heart of Midlothian and The Bride of Lammermoor.

<i>The Lay of the Last Minstrel</i> poem by Walter Scott

"The Lay of the Last Minstrel" (1805) is a long narrative poem by Walter Scott.

The current Duke of Buccleuch, Richard Scott, the 10th Duke, is the largest private landowner in Scotland with some 280,000 acres (1,100 km2) [4] and chairman of the Buccleuch Group, a holding company with interests in commercial property, rural affairs, food, and beverages. The title originally comes from a holding in the Scottish Borders, near Selkirk.

Richard Scott, 10th Duke of Buccleuch Scottish nobleman, b. 1954

Richard Walter John Montagu Douglas Scott, 10th Duke of Buccleuch and 12th Duke of Queensberry,, styled as Lord Eskdaill until 1973 and as Earl of Dalkeith from 1973 until 2007, is a Scottish landholder and peer. He is the Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry, as well as Chief of Clan Scott. He is the heir male of James, Duke of Monmouth, the eldest illegitimate son of King Charles II and his mistress, Lucy Walter.

Scottish Borders Council area of Scotland

The Scottish Borders is one of 32 council areas of Scotland. It borders the City of Edinburgh, Dumfries and Galloway, East Lothian, Midlothian, South Lanarkshire, West Lothian and, to the south-west, south and east, the English counties of Cumbria and Northumberland. The administrative centre of the area is Newtown St Boswells.

Selkirk, Scottish Borders town in the Borders of Scotland, UK

Selkirk is a town and historic royal burgh in the Scottish Borders Council district of southeastern Scotland. It lies on the Ettrick Water, a tributary of the River Tweed.

The family seats are Bowhill House, three miles outside Selkirk, representing the Scott line; Drumlanrig Castle in Dumfries and Galloway, representing the Douglas line; and Boughton House in Northamptonshire, England, representing the Montagu line. These three houses are still lived in by the family and are also open to the public. The family also owns Dalkeith Palace in Midlothian, which is let, and has owned several other country houses and castles in the past. Its historic London residence was Montagu House, Whitehall, now demolished and replaced by the Ministry of Defence.

William Montagu Douglas Scott, The Earl of Dalkeith, who became the 7th Duke of Buccleuch was elected President of St. Andrew's Ambulance Association in 1908. The Presidency of the Association (now St Andrew's First Aid) has been held by the Buccleuch family from that date.

Most of the Dukes of Buccleuch (the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th) are buried in the Buccleuch Memorial Chapel in St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Dalkeith, Midlothian. The 2nd Duke (died 1751) is buried in Eton College Chapel. The most recent Dukes (the 8th and 9th) are buried among the ruins of Melrose Abbey in Melrose. [5]

Feudal barons of Buccleuch (1488)

Lords Scott of Buccleuch (1606)

Earls of Buccleuch (1619)

Dukes of Buccleuch, first Creation (1663)

Dukes of Buccleuch, second Creation (1663)

The heir apparent is the present holder's son Walter John Francis Montagu Douglas Scott, Earl of Dalkeith (born 1984).

Coats of Arms

Family Tree

Scott Family Tree: Earls and Dukes of Buccleuch
LORD SCOTT of Buccleuch, 1606
Walter, 1st Lord Scott
of Buccleuch

(c.1565–1611)
 
 
 
EARL OF BUCCLEUCH, 1619
Walter, 2nd Lord Scott
of Buccleuch,
1st Earl of Buccleuch

(c.1606–1633)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Francis Scott,
2nd Earl of Buccleuch

(1626–1651)
 
King Charles II
(1630–r.1660–1685)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dukes of Cleveland
& Southampton
 
 
Duke of Northumberland
 
 
Dukes of Richmond
& Lennox
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earl of Plymouth
 
Dukes of Grafton
 
Dukes of St Albans
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DUKE OF MONMOUTH, 1663
DUKE OF BUCCLEUCH, 1663
 
DUCHESS OF BUCCLEUCH, 1663
Mary Scott,
3rd Countess of Buccleuch

(1647–1661)
 
James Scott,
1st Duke of Monmouth,
1st Duke of Buccleuch

(1649–1685)
illegitimate
Executed, Dukedom forfeit
 
Anne Scott,
1st Duchess of Buccleuch

(1651–1732)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
James Scott,
Earl of Dalkeith

(1674–1705)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dukes of Queensberry
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Francis Scott,
2nd Duke of Buccleuch

(1695–1751)
Succeeded to grandmother's Dukedom, 1732
 
Lady Jane Douglas
(1701–1729)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Francis Scott,
Earl of Dalkeith

(1721–1750)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Henry Scott,
3rd Duke of Buccleuch,
5th Duke of Queensberry

(1746–1812)
Succeeded to Dukedom of Queensberry, 1810
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
George Scott,
Earl of Dalkeith
(1768)
 
Charles William Henry Montagu-Scott,
4th Duke of Buccleuch,
6th Duke of Queensberry

(1772–1819)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
George Henry Scott,
Lord Scott of Whitchester
(1798–1808)
 
Walter Francis M.D.Scott,
5th Duke of Buccleuch,
7th Duke of Queensberry

(1806–1884)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William Henry Walter M.D.Scott,
6th Duke of Buccleuch,
8th Duke of Queensberry

(1831–1914)
 
 
Henry Douglas-Scott-Montagu,
1st Baron Montagu of Beaulieu

(1832–1905)
Barons Montagu of Beaulieu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Walter Henry M.D.Scott,
Earl of Dalkeith
(1861–1886)
 
John Charles M.D.Scott,
7th Duke of Buccleuch,
9th Duke of Queensberry

(1864–1935)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Walter John M.D.Scott,
8th Duke of Buccleuch,
10th Duke of Queensberry

(1894–1973)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Walter Francis John M.D.Scott,
9th Duke of Buccleuch,
11th Duke of Queensberry

(1923–2007)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Richard Walter John M.D.Scott,
10th Duke of Buccleuch,
12th Duke of Queensberry

(b. 1954)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Walter John Francis M.D.Scott,
Earl of Dalkeith

(b. 1984)

In media

See also

Related Research Articles

Marquess of Queensberry

Marquess of Queensberry is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. The title has been held since its creation in 1682 by a member of the Douglas family. The Marquesses also held the title of Duke of Queensberry from 1684 to 1810, when it was inherited by the Duke of Buccleuch.

Duke of Queensberry

The title Duke of Queensberry was created in the Peerage of Scotland on 3 February 1684 along with the subsidiary title Marquess of Dumfriesshire for the 1st Marquess of Queensberry. The Dukedom was held along with the Marquessate of Queensberry until the death of the 4th Duke in 1810, when the Marquessate was inherited by Sir Charles Douglas of Kelhead, 5th Baronet, while the Dukedom was inherited by the 3rd Duke of Buccleuch. Since then the title of Duke of Queensberry has been held by the Dukes of Buccleuch.

Baron Montagu of Beaulieu

Baron Montagu of Beaulieu, in the County of Hampshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom and the Noble House of Montagu. It was created in 1885 for the Conservative politician Lord Henry Montagu Douglas Scott, who had earlier represented Selkirkshire and South Hampshire in the House of Commons. He was the second son of Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch. His son, the second Baron, sat as a Conservative Member of Parliament for New Forest. The 3rd Baron Montagu of Beaulieu was one of the ninety elected hereditary peers that remain in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999, and sat on the Conservative benches. As descendants of the 5th Duke of Buccleuch, the Barons Montagu of Beaulieu are also in remainder to this peerage and its subsidiary titles.

Louisa Jane Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry was the daughter of James Hamilton, 1st Duke of Abercorn. In 1884, she became the Duchess of Buccleuch and Duchess of Queensberry, the wife of William Henry Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 6th Duke of Buccleuch & 8th Duke of Queensberry. She was the paternal grandmother of Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester and of Marian Louisa, Lady Elmhirst, as well as the maternal great-grandmother of Prince William of Gloucester, Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester and great-great-grandmother of Sarah, Duchess of York.

Charlotte Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch peeress

Charlotte Anne Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry, VA was a British peeress. A daughter of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath, Charlotte married Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch in 1829. They had seven children, including William Montagu Douglas Scott, 6th Duke of Buccleuch, Henry Douglas-Scott-Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu of Beaulieu, and the Royal Navy admiral Lord Charles Montagu Douglas Scott.

Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch British politician and nobleman

Walter Francis Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch, 7th Duke of Queensberry,, styled The Honourable Charles Montagu-Scott between 1806 and 1808, Lord Eskdail between 1808 and 1812 and Earl of Dalkeith between 1812 and 1819, was a Scottish politician and nobleman. He was Lord Privy Seal 1842 to 1846.

John Scott, 9th Duke of Buccleuch British politician

Walter Francis John Montagu Douglas Scott, 9th Duke of Buccleuch and 11th Duke of Queensberry, was a Scottish Peer, politician, and landowner. He served in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve in the Second World War, and represented Edinburgh North in the House of Commons for 13 years.

Henry Scott, 3rd Duke of Buccleuch 18th/19th-century Scottish noble

Henry Scott, 3rd Duke of Buccleuch and 5th Duke of Queensberry KG KT FRSE was a Scottish nobleman and long-time friend of Sir Walter Scott. He is the paternal 3rd great-grandfather of Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester, and the maternal 4th great-grandfather of Prince William of Gloucester and Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester.

Anne Scott, 1st Duchess of Buccleuch Scottish peeress

Anne Scott, 1st Duchess of Buccleuch was a wealthy Scottish peer.

Charles Montagu-Scott, 4th Duke of Buccleuch English politician and cricketer

Charles William Henry Montagu-Scott, 4th Duke of Buccleuch and 6th Duke of Queensberry, KT, styled Earl of Dalkeith until 1812, was a British landowner, amateur cricketer and Tory politician.

William Montagu Douglas Scott, 6th Duke of Buccleuch British politician

William Henry Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 6th Duke of Buccleuch and 8th Duke of Queensberry was a Scottish Member of Parliament and peer. He was the paternal grandfather of Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester, and the maternal great-grandfather of Prince William of Gloucester and Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester. He was a paternal great-great-grandfather to Sarah, Duchess of York.

Francis Scott, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch 2nd Duke of Buccleuch

Francis Scott, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch, KT, FRS was a Scottish nobleman.

Walter Scott, Earl of Dalkeith Heir apparent to the dukedoms of Buccleuch and Queensberry

Walter John Francis Montagu Douglas Scott, Earl of Dalkeith is a Scottish nobleman. He is the second child and elder son of Richard Montagu Douglas Scott, 10th Duke of Buccleuch & 12th Duke of Queensberry, and the former Lady Elizabeth Kerr, a daughter of Peter Kerr, 12th Marquess of Lothian, and Antonella Reuss Newland. He is heir apparent to the Dukedoms of Buccleuch and Queensberry.

This page lists extant dukedoms in the Peerages of the British Isles, listed by the monarch who created them—see also List of dukedoms in the peerages of Britain and Ireland.

John Montagu Douglas Scott, 7th Duke of Buccleuch duke

John Charles Montagu Douglas Scott, 7th Duke of Buccleuch and 9th Duke of Queensberry,, styled The Honourable John Montagu Douglas Scott until 1884, Lord John Montagu Douglas Scott between 1884 and 1886 and Earl of Dalkeith until 1914 was a Scottish Member of Parliament and peer.

Montagu Douglas Scott may refer to:

Jane Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry was a fashion model for Norman Hartnell before marrying John Scott, Earl of Dalkeith, the future 9th Duke of Buccleuch and 11th Duke of Queensberry.

Elizabeth Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch (1743–1827) Scottish noblewoman

Elizabeth Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch, formerly Lady Elizabeth Montagu, was the wife of Henry Scott, 3rd Duke of Buccleuch.

References

  1. Berry, William; Glover, Robert (1828). Encyclopædia Heraldica: Or, Complete Dictionary of Heraldry. p. 460.
  2. Wikisource-logo.svg One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Buccleuch, Dukes of". Encyclopædia Britannica . 4 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 712.
  3. "Requirements for recognition". The Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs. Archived from the original on 7 August 2012.
  4. Ross, David (5 June 2013). "Questions raised over land swap deal with billionaire". The Herald. Retrieved 12 January 2015.
  5. "St Mary's Episcopal Chapel - Clan Scott Scotland".
  6. Scots Peerage, p. 249
  7. scotarmigers.net