Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh

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Dukedom of Gloucester
and Edinburgh
Coat of Arms of William Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh.svg
Creation date19 November 1764
Monarch King George III
Peerage Peerage of Great Britain
First holder Prince William Henry
Last holder Prince William Frederick
Remainder tothe 1st Duke's heirs male of the body lawfully begotten
Subsidiary titles Earl of Connaught
Extinction date30 November 1834

Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh ( /ˈɡlɒstər/ ) was a British royal title (after Gloucester and Edinburgh) in the Peerage of Great Britain; the sole creation carried with it the subsidiary title of Earl of Connaught.

A title is one or more words used before or after a person's name, in certain contexts. It may signify either veneration, an official position, or a professional or academic qualification. In some languages, titles may be inserted between the first and last name. Some titles are hereditary.

Gloucester City and Non-metropolitan district in England

Gloucester is a city and district in Gloucestershire, in the South West of England, of which it is the county town. Gloucester lies close to the Welsh border, on the River Severn, between the Cotswolds to the east and the Forest of Dean to the southwest.

Edinburgh Capital city in Scotland

Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, it is located in Lothian on the Firth of Forth's southern shore.

Contents

The only creation was for the brother of King George III, Prince William; there had previously been Dukes of Gloucester and of Edinburgh, but Prince William's full title was "Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh".

George III of the United Kingdom King of Great Britain and Ireland

George III was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820. He was concurrently Duke and prince-elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg ("Hanover") in the Holy Roman Empire before becoming King of Hanover on 12 October 1814. He was the third British monarch of the House of Hanover, but unlike his two predecessors, he was born in Great Britain, spoke English as his first language, and never visited Hanover.

Duke of Gloucester

Duke of Gloucester is a British royal title, often conferred on one of the sons of the reigning monarch. The first four creations were in the Peerage of England and the last in the Peerage of the United Kingdom; the current creation carries with it the subsidiary titles of Earl of Ulster and Baron Culloden.

Duke of Edinburgh Dukedom in the Peerage of the United Kingdom

Duke of Edinburgh, named after the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, is a substantive title that has been created three times for members of the British royal family since 1726. The current holder is Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth II.

Dukes of Gloucester and Edinburgh

After the Union of Great Britain, the Hanoverian kings liked to grant double titles (one from one constituent country, one from another) to emphasise unity.

Kingdom of Great Britain Constitutional monarchy in Western Europe between 1707–1801

The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain, was a sovereign state in western Europe from 1 May 1707 to 31 December 1800. The state came into being following the Treaty of Union in 1706, ratified by the Acts of Union 1707, which united the kingdoms of England and Scotland to form a single kingdom encompassing the whole island of Great Britain and its outlying islands, with the exception of the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. The unitary state was governed by a single parliament and government that was based in Westminster. The former kingdoms had been in personal union since James VI of Scotland became King of England and King of Ireland in 1603 following the death of Elizabeth I, bringing about the "Union of the Crowns". After the accession of George I to the throne of Great Britain in 1714, the kingdom was in a personal union with the Electorate of Hanover.

Countries of the United Kingdom The four countries of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, which make up the United Kingdom

The United Kingdom (UK) comprises four countries: England, Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland.

DukePortraitBirthMarriagesDeath
Prince William Henry
House of Hanover
1764–1805
also: Earl of Connaught (1764)
WilliamHenryDukeOfGloucester.jpg 25 November 1743
Leicester House
son of Frederick, Prince of Wales and Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha
Maria Walpole
1766
3 children
25 August 1805
Gloucester House
aged 61
Prince William Frederick
House of Hanover
1805–1834
also: Earl of Connaught (1805)
2ndDukeOfGloucester.jpg 15 January 1776
Teodoli Palace
son of Prince William Henry and Maria Walpole
Princess Mary of the United Kingdom
1816
no children
30 November 1834
Bagshot Park
aged 58
Prince William Frederick and Princess Mary had no children and all his titles became extinct on his death.

Family tree

Family tree: Dukes of Gloucester and Edinburgh
 
 
King George II
(1683–r.1727–1760)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prince Frederick Louis,
Prince of Wales

(1707–1751)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DUKE OF GLOUCESTER
& EDINBURGH, 1764
 
 
King George III
(1738–r.1760–1820)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prince William Henry,
1st Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh

(1743–1805)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
King George IV
(1762–r.1820–1830)
 
King William IV
(1765–r.1830–1837)
 
Prince Edward,
Duke of Kent

(1767–1820)
 
Princess Mary
(1776–1857)
 
Prince William Frederick,
2nd Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh

(1776–1834)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Queen Victoria
(1819–r.1837–1901)

See also

The title of Earl of Gloucester was created several times in the Peerage of England. A fictional earl is also a character in William Shakespeare's play King Lear.

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