Dunraven Peak

Last updated
Dunraven Peak
Dunraven Peak viewed from Mount Washburn trail.JPG
Dunraven Peak (center), viewed from the Mount Washburn trail
Highest point
Elevation 9,869 ft (3,008 m) [1]
Coordinates 44°46′58″N110°28′10″W / 44.78278°N 110.46944°W / 44.78278; -110.46944 (Dunraven Peak) Coordinates: 44°46′58″N110°28′10″W / 44.78278°N 110.46944°W / 44.78278; -110.46944 (Dunraven Peak) [1]
Geography
USA Wyoming location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Dunraven Peak
Yellowstone National Park, Park County, Wyoming
Parent range Washburn Range
Topo map Mount Washburn

Dunraven Peak el. 9,869 feet (3,008 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range of Yellowstone National Park. In 1874, just two years after the park's creation, the Earl of Dunraven, a titled Englishman made a visit to Yellowstone in conjunction with a hunting expedition led by Texas Jack Omohundro to the Northern Rockies. He was so impressed with the park, that he devoted well over 150 pages to Yellowstone in his The Great Divide , published in London in 1874. The Great Divide was one of the earliest works to praise and publicize the park.

Yellowstone National Park first national park in the world, located in the US states Wyoming, Montana and Idaho

Yellowstone National Park is an American national park located in Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. It was established by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on March 1, 1872. Yellowstone was the first national park in the U.S. and is also widely held to be the first national park in the world. The park is known for its wildlife and its many geothermal features, especially Old Faithful geyser, one of its most popular features. It has many types of ecosystems, but the subalpine forest is the most abundant. It is part of the South Central Rockies forests ecoregion.

Windham Wyndham-Quin, 4th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl Irish noble, Glamorgan landowner and politician, sportsman and author

Windham Thomas Wyndham-Quin, 4th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl,, styled Viscount Adare between 1850 and 1871, was an Anglo-Irish journalist, landowner, entrepreneur, sportsman and Conservative politician. He served as Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies under Lord Salisbury from 1885 to 1886 and 1886 to 1887. He also successfully presided over the 1902 Land Conference and was the founder of the Irish Reform Association. He recruited two regiments of sharpshooters, leading them in the Boer War and later establishing a unit in Ireland.

Texas Jack Omohundro frontier scout, actor, and cowboy

John Baker Omohundro, also known as "Texas Jack," was an American frontier scout, actor, and cowboy. Born in rural Virginia he served in the Confederacy during the American Civil War and later as a civilian scout for the US Army during the Indian Wars. Before his untimely death, Texas Jack became a legendary figure in the American Old West as a western showman performing dramas on the stage throughout the country, and was immortalized in dime novels published around the world.

In 1878 during a U.S. Geological Survey of the park, Henry Gannett, a geographer working with the survey, named a peak just two miles southwest of Mount Washburn in the honor of the Earl of Dunraven and the service his book had done for the park. In 1879, Philetus Norris, the park superintendent gave a pass on the Grand Loop Road between Tower and Canyon the name Dunraven Pass because of its proximity to Dunraven Peak. [2]

Henry Gannett United States geographer

Henry Gannett was an American geographer who is described as the "Father of the Quadrangle" which is the basis for topographical maps in the United States.

Mount Washburn mountain of the Rocky Mountains

Mount Washburn, elevation 10,243 feet (3,122 m), is a prominent mountain peak in the Washburn Range in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The peak was named in 1870 to honor Henry D. Washburn, leader of the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition. The Washburn Range is one of two mountains ranges completely within the boundaries of Yellowstone.

Philetus Norris Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park

Philetus W. Norris was the second superintendent of Yellowstone National Park and was the first person to be paid for that position.

Duraven Peak's namesake, Earl of Dunraven 4thEarlOfDunraven.jpg
Duraven Peak's namesake, Earl of Dunraven

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Dunraven Peak". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey.
  2. Haines, Aubrey L. (1996). Yellowstone Place Names-Mirrors of History. Niwot, Colorado: University Press of Colorado. pp. 104–106. ISBN   0-87081-382-X.

Related Research Articles

Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition research expedition

The Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition of 1869 was the first organized expedition to explore the region that became Yellowstone National Park. The privately financed expedition was carried out by David E. Folsom, Charles W. Cook and William Peterson of Diamond City, Montana, a gold camp in the Confederate Gulch area of the Big Belt Mountains east of Helena, Montana. The journals kept by Cook and Folsom, as well as their personal accounts to friends were of significant inspirational value to spur the organization of the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition which visited Yellowstone in 1870.

Dunraven Pass

Dunraven Pass is a mountain pass on the Grand Loop Road between Tower and Canyon in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

Dunraven may refer to:

Outline of Yellowstone National Park Wikimedia list article

The following articles relate to the history, geography, geology, flora, fauna, structures and recreation in Yellowstone National Park.

Hayden Valley landform

Hayden Valley is a large, sub-alpine valley in Yellowstone National Park straddling the Yellowstone River between Yellowstone Falls and Yellowstone Lake. The valley floor along the river is an ancient lake bed from a time when Yellowstone Lake was much larger. The valley is well known as one of the best locations to view wildlife in Yellowstone.

Hayden Geological Survey of 1871 1871 federal geological exploration of US territories

The Hayden Geological Survey of 1871 explored the region of northwestern Wyoming that later became Yellowstone National Park in 1872. It was led by geologist Ferdinand Vandeveer Hayden. The 1871 survey was not Hayden's first, but it was the first federally funded, geological survey to explore and further document features in the region soon to become Yellowstone National Park and played a prominent role in convincing the U.S. Congress to pass the legislation creating the park. In 1894, Nathaniel P. Langford, the first park superintendent and a member of the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition which explored the park in 1870, wrote this about the Hayden expedition:

We trace the creation of the park from the Folsom-Cook expedition of 1869 to the Washburn expedition of 1870, and thence to the Hayden expedition of 1871, Not to one of these expeditions more than to another do we owe the legislation which set apart this "pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people"

Specimen Ridge mountain in United States of America

Specimen Ridge, el. 8,379 feet (2,554 m) is an approximately 8.5-mile (13.7 km) ridge along the south rim of the Lamar Valley in Yellowstone National Park. The ridge separates the Lamar Valley from Mirror Plateau. The ridge is oriented northwest to southeast from the Tower Junction area to Amethyst Mountain. The ridge is known for its abundance of amethyst, opal and petrified wood. It was referred to as Specimen Mountain by local miners and was probably named by prospectors well before 1870. The south side of the ridge is traversed by the 18.8-mile (30.3 km) Specimen Ridge Trail between Tower Junction and Soda Butte Creek. The trail passes through the Petrified Forest and over the summit of Amethyst Mountain el. 9,614 feet (2,930 m).

Mount Sheridan mountain

Mount Sheridan el. 10,313 feet (3,143 m) is a prominent mountain peak overlooking Heart Lake in the Red Mountains of Yellowstone National Park. The peak is named in honor of General Philip H. Sheridan, U.S. Army, one of the early protectors of the park.

Mount Schurz mountain in United States of America

Mount Schurz el. 11,007 feet (3,355 m) is a mountain peak in the Absaroka Range in Yellowstone National Park. Mount Schurz is the second highest peak in Yellowstone. The mountain was originally named Mount Doane by Henry D. Washburn during the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition in 1871. Later the name Mount Doane was given to another peak in the Absaroka Range by geologist Arnold Hague. In 1885, Hague named the mountain for the 13th U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Carl Schurz (1877–1881). Schurz was the first Secretary of the Interior to visit Yellowstone and a strong supporter of the national park movement.

Mount Doane mountain in United States of America

Mount Doane el. 10,551 feet (3,216 m) is a mountain peak in the Absaroka Range in Yellowstone National Park. The peak is named for Lieutenant Gustavus Cheyney Doane, a U.S. Army cavalry officer who escorted the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition into Yellowstone in 1870. During that expedition, Doane and Nathaniel P. Langford ascended several peaks east of Yellowstone Lake.

Colter Peak mountain in United States of America

Colter Peak el. 10,640 feet (3,240 m) is a mountain peak in the Absaroka Range in the southeastern section of Yellowstone National Park. The peak is named for mountain man John Colter, reputedly the first white man to visit the Yellowstone region. Colter Peak was first ascended in 1870 by Lt. Gustavus Cheyney Doane and Nathaniel P. Langford during the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition. Henry D. Washburn, the expedition leader named the peak for Langford and Doane. For unknown reasons, geologist Ferdinand V. Hayden moved those names to peaks farther north in 1871 during the Hayden Geological Survey of 1871. In 1888, Philetus Norris the second park superintendent, named the peak Mount Forum for unknown reasons. In 1885, geologist Arnold Hague gave the peak its official name: Colter Peak.

Factory Hill mountain in United States of America

Factory Hill el. 9,527 feet (2,904 m) is a mountain peak in the Red Mountains of Yellowstone National Park. It is directly north of Mount Sheridan and west of the Heart Lake Geyser Basin. Early in the history of Yellowstone, this peak was call Red Mountain by the Hayden surveys, a name later transferred to the range in which it resides. In 1885, the Hague Geological Survey gave the peak its present name based on the following passage by Nathaniel P. Langford in his 1871 Scribner's account of the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition. Langford's party was camped near the south arm of Yellowstone Lake at the time.

Mount Langford mountain in United States of America

Mount Langford el. 10,623 feet (3,238 m) is a mountain peak in the Absaroka Range in Yellowstone National Park. The peak is named for Nathaniel P. Langford, the first superintendent of Yellowstone and a leader of the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition to Yellowstone in 1870. The expedition and Langford's subsequent promotion in Scribner's helped in the creation of the park in 1872.

Barronette Peak mountain in United States of America

Barronette Peak el. 10,354 feet (3,156 m) is a mountain peak in the northeast section of Yellowstone National Park in the Absaroka Range. The peak is named for Collins Jack Baronette (1829–1901). It was named by the Hayden Geological Survey of 1878. When named, the name was misspelled Barronette and it retains the official misspelled name today.

Cook Peak mountain in Wyoming, USA

Cook Peak el. 9,754 feet (2,973 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range of Yellowstone National Park. The peak was named in 1922 by then superintendent Horace Albright to honor of Charles W. Cook, a member of the 1869 Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition which explored the Yellowstone park region. 1922 was the 50th anniversary of the park's creation, and Charles Cook, still living in Montana, attended ceremonies in the park. Prior to 1922, the peak had been named Thompson Peak by Philetus Norris in 1880 and Storm Peak by members of the Arnold Hague Geological Surveys in 1885.

Folsom Peak mountain in United States of America

Folsom Peak el. 9,334 feet (2,845 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range of Yellowstone National Park. The peak was named in 1895 by geologist Arnold Hague to honor David E. Folsom, a member of the Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition of 1869. Folsom, Peterson and Cook were some of the 1st explorers of the Yellowstone region to publish their exploration.

Hedges Peak mountain in United States of America

Hedges Peak el. 9,669 feet (2,947 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range in Yellowstone National Park. The peak was named in 1895 by geologist Arnold Hague to honor Cornelius Hedges (1837–1907), a member of the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition of 1871 and prominent Montana lawyer. Hedges accounts of the expedition in Helena Daily Herald newspaper contributed to the campaign to create Yellowstone National Park. Prior to 1895 the peak had been named Surprise Peak by geologist J.P. Iddings in 1883.

Prospect Peak (Park County, Wyoming) summit in Wyoming

Prospect Peak el. 9,527 feet (2,904 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range of Yellowstone National Park. The summit is located approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) west southwest of Tower Junction. Between 1883-85, members of the Arnold Hague Geological Surveys named the peak Surprise Peak for reasons not now known. In 1880, then superintendent Philetus Norris had named the peak Mount Stephans for one of his assistants, C. N. Stephans. However, in 1885 Arnold Hague, for reasons again not known today, gave the peak its present name—Prospect Peak. The USGS has also mapped this summit as Mount Stephens. and also cited Surprise Peak as an alternate name.

Amethyst Mountain, el. 9,609 feet (2,929 m) is the highest peak and central part of a northwest – southeast trending ridge that lies between the Lamar River to the northeast and Deep Creek to the southwest within Park County, Wyoming. From northwest to southeast, this ridge consists of Specimen Ridge, Amethyst Mountain, and the Mirror Plateau in Yellowstone National Park. The nearest town is Silver Gate, Montana, which is 19.2 miles away.