Eóganacht Glendamnach

Last updated

Eóganacht Glendamnach were a branch of the Eóganachta, the ruling dynasty of Munster during the 5th-10th centuries. They took their name from Glendamnach (Glanworth, County Cork). They were descended from Óengus mac Nad Froích (died 489), the first Christian King of Munster through his son Eochaid mac Óengusa (died 522) and grandson Crimthann Srem mac Echado (died c. 542). Kings of Cashel and Munster from the Eóganacht Glendamnach were:

Eóganachta historic Irish dynasty

The Eóganachta or Eoghanachta were an Irish dynasty centred on Cashel which dominated southern Ireland from the 6/7th to the 10th centuries, and following that, in a restricted form, the Kingdom of Desmond, and its offshoot Carbery, to the late 16th century. By tradition the dynasty was founded by Conall Corc but named after his ancestor Éogan, the firstborn son of the semi-mythological 3rd-century king Ailill Aulom. This dynastic clan-name, for it was never in any sense a 'surname,' should more accurately be restricted to those branches of the royal house which descended from Conall Corc, who established Cashel as his royal seat in the late 5th century.

Munster province in Ireland

Munster is one of the provinces of Ireland, in the south west of Ireland. In early Ireland, the Kingdom of Munster was one of the kingdoms of Gaelic Ireland ruled by a "king of over-kings". Following the Norman invasion of Ireland, the ancient kingdoms were shired into counties for administrative and judicial purposes. In later centuries, local government legislation has seen further sub-division of the historic counties.

Glanworth Village in Munster, Ireland

Glanworth is a village on the R512 regional road, 8 km northwest of the town of Fermoy in County Cork, Ireland. It lies approximately 40 km northeast of the city of Cork, the county's administrative centre, and 210 km southwest of Dublin. The combined population of Glanworth East and Glanworth West in 2006 was 1,316, an increase of 8.6% since 2002.

Coirpre Cromm mac Crimthainn was a King of Munster from the Eóganacht Glendamnach sept of the ruling Eoganachta dynasty. This branch was centered at Glanworth, County Cork. He was the son of Crimthann Srem mac Echado.

Cathal mac Áedo Flaind Chathrach was a King of Cashel in Munster from the Glendamnach sept of the Eoganachta. He was the son of Áed Fland Cathrach and grandson of Coirpre Cromm mac Crimthainn a previous king of Cashel. He succeeded to the throne on the death of Fíngen mac Áedo Duib in 618.

Cathal Cú-cen-máthair mac Cathaíl, often known as Cú-cen-máthair, was an Irish King of Munster from around 661 until his death. He was a son of Cathal mac Áedo Flaind Chathrach and belonged to the Glendamnach sept of the Eóganachta dynasty. The name Cú-cen-máthair means the "motherless hound".

King lists for the 6th century give a virtual monopoly to the Glendamnach branch, but those based on the Laud Synchronisms were probably written at Cloyne in the mid 8th century, a monastery favorable to the Glendamnach branch. The Eóganacht Glendanmach were considered part of the inner circle of Eoganachta dynasties which included the Chaisil and Áine. These three branches rotated the kingship of Munster in the 7th and much of the 8th centuries. The last king from this branch died in 821. Their later ruling sept were the Ó Caiomh (O'Keeffes).

Cloyne Town in Munster, Ireland

Cloyne is a small town to the southeast of Midleton in eastern County Cork. It is also a see city of the Anglican Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, while also giving its name to a Roman Catholic diocese. St Colman's Cathedral in Cloyne is a cathedral church of the Church of Ireland while the Pro Cathedral of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Cloyne, Cobh Cathedral of Saint Colman, overlooks Cork Harbour.

OKeeffe family name

O'Keeffe, also O'Keefe, Keef, Keefe or Keeffe, is the name of an Irish Gaelic clan based most prominently in what is today County Cork, particularly around Fermoy and Duhallow. The name comes from caomh, meaning "kind" or "gentle"; some reformed spellings present it as Ó Cuív and the feminine form of the original is Ní Chaoimh. As the primary sept of the Eóganacht Glendamnach, the family were once Kings of Munster from the 6th to the 8th centuries.

Related Research Articles

Cathal mac Finguine was an Irish King of Munster or Cashel, and effectively High King of Ireland as well. He belonged to the Eóganacht Glendamnach sept of the dominant Eóganachta kin-group whose members dominated Munster from the 7th century to the 10th. His father, uncle, grandfather, and great-grandfather had also been kings of Cashel, so too were his son and grandson.

Eóganacht Locha Léin or Ui Caipre Luachra were a branch of the ruling Eoganachta of Munster. Their territory was in Iarmuman or West Munster. Luachair (Lúachra) is the old name of a large district on the borders of Co Cork, Kerry and Limerick. Cairbre of Sliobh Luachra was on the Cork-Kerry border; Éoganacht Locha Lein is around the Lakes of Killarney.

Feidlimid mac Óengusa (455-500), or Feidlimid Dub, was an Eoganachta King of Munster in the early 6th century. He was the son of Óengus mac Nad Froích, the first Christian king of Munster.

Finguine mac Cathail Con-cen-máthair was a King of Munster from the Glendamnach branch of the Eoganachta. He was the son of Cathal Cú-cen-máthair mac Cathaíl. He succeeded Colgú mac Faílbe Flaind in 678.

Ailill mac Cathail Con-cen-máthair was a King of Munster from the Glendamnach branch of the Eoganachta. He was the son of Cathal Cú-cen-máthair mac Cathaíl and brother of his predecessor Finguine mac Cathail Con-cen-máthair.

Kingdom of Munster kingdom in south Ireland

The Kingdom of Munster was a kingdom of Gaelic Ireland which existed in the south-west of the island from at least the 1st century BC until 1118. According to traditional Irish history found in the Annals of the Four Masters, the kingdom originated as the territory of the Clanna Dedad, an Érainn tribe of Irish Gaels. Some of the early kings were prominent in the Red Branch Cycle such as Cú Roí and Conaire Mór. For a few centuries they were competitors for the High Kingship or Ireland, but ultimately lost out to the Connachta, descendants of Conn Cétchathach. The kingdom had different borders and internal divisions at different times during its history.

Cathussach mac Eterscélai was a king of Munster from the Eóganacht Áine branch of the Eóganachta. He was the son of Eterscél mac Máele Umai, a previous king. His branch of the Eóganachta was situated in the south east of modern County Limerick at Cnoc Áine (Knockainy) near the monastery of Emly in County Tipperary.

Máel Dúin mac Áedo was a possible King of Munster from the Eóganacht Locha Léin branch of the Eóganachta. He was the son of Áed Bennán mac Conaing, a king of Iarmuman or West Munster and great great grandson of Áed Bennán mac Crimthainn who may have been King of all Munster.

Ólchobar mac Duib-Indrecht was a supposed King of Munster from the Eóganacht Áine branch of the Eóganachta. His last paternal ancestor to hold the throne was Cúán mac Amalgado, five generations previous. His great grandfather Uisnech had been the brother of another King Eterscél mac Máele Umai. According to a genealogical tract Uisneach was heir apparent to the Munster throne until slain by his brother through envy and hatred and then Eterscél assumed the kingship of Munster.

Artrí mac Cathail was a King of Munster from the Glendamnach branch of the Eoganachta. He was the son of Cathal mac Finguine, a previous king. He reigned from 793 to 820.

Eóganacht Chaisil were a branch of the Eóganachta, the ruling dynasty of Munster during the 5th-10th centuries. They took their name from Cashel which was the capital of the early Catholic kingdom of Munster. They were descended from Óengus mac Nad Froích, the first Christian King of Munster, through his son Feidlimid mac Óengusa.

Eóganacht Áine or Eóganacht Áine Cliach was a princely house of the Eóganachta, dynasty of Munster during the 5th–12th centuries. They took their name from the Hill of Áine near the present day village of Knockainy, County Limerick. This region of Cliú is centred on the barony of Smallcounty in eastern Limerick. The nearby village of Emly was the ecclesiastical center of Munster at the time.

Eóganacht Airthir Cliach were a branch of the Eóganachta, the ruling dynasty of Munster during the 5th-10th centuries. They took their name from Cliú, a territory in eastern Co.Limerick and parts of Tipperary. Airthir meant east and their territory was in the eastern section of this territory in Tipperary County around Tipperary town. They were descended from Óengus mac Nad Froích, the first Christian King of Munster through his son Eochaid mac Óengusa and grandson Crimthann Dearcon mac Echado. Crimthann's mother Dearcon was a member of the Arada Cliach, a minor group in Cliú.

Eóganacht Raithlind or Uí Echach Muman are a branch of the Eóganachta, the ruling dynasty of Munster during the 5th-10th centuries. They took their name from Raithlinn or Raithleann described around the area of Bandon, in the same area. Archaeologists believe that Garranes Ringfort in Templemartin parish, near Bandon, County Cork may have been Rath Raithleann, the royal seat of the Éoganacht Raithleann. They are descended from Mac Cass, the son of Conall Corc, the first King of Cashel, through Mac Cass' son Echu.

Congal mac Máele Dúin was a King of Iarmuman from the Eóganacht Locha Léin branch of the Eoganachta, the ruling dynasty of Munster. He was the son of Máel Dúin mac Áedo Bennán, previous king of Iarmuman and grandson of Áed Bennán mac Crimthainn, who may have been King of all Munster. He ruled from 661 to 690.

Taileflaith is a rare Gaelic-Irish woman's name from the early Irish historic era, found in the kingdoms of Munster and Laigin.

References

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.