E. A. Reitan

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Earl Aaron Reitain (May 3, 1925 – October 15, 2015) was an American historian. [1]

He was born in Grove City, Minnesota and served in World War II as a United States Army rifleman. He was awarded both the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star Medal for his service. [1] Reitan attended Concordia College after the war and was awarded a doctorate in 1954 from the University of Illinois. [1] Between 1970 and 1973 he was chairman of Illinois State University's department of history. [1]

Grove City, Minnesota City in Minnesota, United States

Grove City is a city in Meeker County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 635 at the 2010 census.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

United States Army Land warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Army (USA) is the land warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces. It is one of the seven uniformed services of the United States, and is designated as the Army of the United States in the United States Constitution. As the oldest and most senior branch of the U.S. military in order of precedence, the modern U.S. Army has its roots in the Continental Army, which was formed to fight the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783)—before the United States of America was established as a country. After the Revolutionary War, the Congress of the Confederation created the United States Army on 3 June 1784 to replace the disbanded Continental Army. The United States Army considers itself descended from the Continental Army, and dates its institutional inception from the origin of that armed force in 1775.

Reitan's first article on the civil list of Georgian Britain was called "seminal" by W. A. Speck, who also called his Politics, Finance and the People the "definitive account of the campaign for economical reform". [2]

A civil list is a list of individuals to whom money is paid by the government. It is a term especially associated with the United Kingdom and its former colonies of Canada and New Zealand. It was originally defined as expenses supporting the monarch. Morocco has a civil list defined in its constitution of 1996.

William Arthur Speck was a British historian who specialised in late 17th and 18th-century British and American history.

Works

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 'Earl Reitan', The Pantagraph (October 22, 2015), retrieved 13 February 2019.
  2. W. A. Speck, 'Reviewed Work: Politics, Finance and the People: Economical Reform in England in the Age of the American Revolution, 1770–92 by Earl A. Reitan', History, Vol. 93, No. 2 (310) (April 2008), pp. 277-278.

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