E1 Series Shinkansen

Last updated

E1 series
JReastE1 Omiya 20120918.jpg
E1 series train set M5 in September 2012
In serviceJuly 1994 September 2012
Manufacturer Hitachi, Kawasaki Heavy Industries
Family nameMax
Constructed19941995
Refurbished20032006
Scrapped2012
Number built72 vehicles (6 sets)
Number in serviceNone
Number preserved1 vehicle
Number scrapped71 vehicles
Formation12 cars per trainset
Fleet numbersM1M6
Capacity1,235
Operator(s) JR East
Depot(s)Sendai, Niigata
Line(s) served Tohoku Shinkansen, Joetsu Shinkansen
Specifications
Car body constructionSteel
Car lengthEnd cars: 26,050 mm (85 ft 6 in),
Intermediate cars: 25,000 mm (82 ft 0 in)
Width3,430 mm (11 ft 3 in)
Height4,493 mm (14 ft 9 in)
DoorsTwo per side
Maximum speed240 km/h (150 mph)
Traction system(AC) MT204 (24 x 410 kW)
Power output9.84 MW (13,200 hp)
Acceleration 1.6  km/(h⋅s) (0.99  mph/s)
Electric system(s) 25 kV AC, 50 Hz, overhead catenary
Current collection method PS201 pantograph
Bogies DT205 (motored), TR7003 (trailer)
Safety system(s) ATC-2, DS-ATC
Multiple working None
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge

The E1 series (E1系) was a high-speed Shinkansen train type operated by East Japan Railway Company (JR East) in Japan from July 1994 until September 2012. They were the first double-deck trains built for Japan's Shinkansen. They were generally, along with their fellow double-deck class the E4 series, known by the marketing name "Max" (Multi-Amenity eXpress). [1] The fleet was withdrawn from regular service on 28 September 2012. [2]

Contents

Originally intended to be classified as 600 series, [3] the E1 series trains were introduced specifically to relieve overcrowding on services used by commuters on the Tohoku Shinkansen and Joetsu Shinkansen.

Operations

E1 series sets were used on the following services. [4]

An E1 series train at Takasaki Station on a Joetsu Shinkansen Max Toki service in 2008 E1inTakasaki.JPG
An E1 series train at Takasaki Station on a Joetsu Shinkansen Max Toki service in 2008

Formation

The fleet of 12-car sets, numbered M1 to M6, were formed as follows, with car 1 at the Tokyo end. [5]

Car No.123456789101112
DesignationT1cM1M2T1T2M1M2TpkTpsM1sM2sT2c
NumberingE153-100E155-100E156-100E158-100E159E155E156E158-200E148E145E146E154
Seating capacity861211211351241101109175919180
Weight (t)56.259.261.253.753.659.261.755.254.659.262.056.5

Cars 6 and 10 were each equipped with a PS201 scissors-type pantograph. [5]

Fleet details

Set No.ManufacturerDeliveredReliveriedRefurbishedDS-ATC addedWithdrawn
M1 Kawasaki HI 3 March 199417 September 200410 July 200415 September 20052 April 2012 [6]
M2 Hitachi 23 March 199427 November 20044 June 20055 August 200514 April 2012 [6]
M3Hitachi/Kawasaki HI6 February 199526 December 200331 March 20042 November 200529 August 2012 [6]
M4Hitachi17 October 199525 November 20032 October 20032 February 20067 December 2012 [7]
M5Kawasaki HI3 November 199511 March 20066 June 200611 March 20064 October 2012 [7]
M6Hitachi/Kawasaki HI22 November 199527 November 200523 December 200527 November 20057 November 2012 [7]

(Sources: [5] [8] )

Interior

The E1 series was the first revenue-earning shinkansen to feature 3+3 abreast seating in standard class for increased seating capacity. The upper deck saloons of non-reserved cars 1 to 4 were arranged 3+3 with no individual armrests, and did not recline. The lower decks of these cars, and the reserved-seating saloons in cars 5 to 12 had regular 2+3 seating. The Green car saloons on the upper decks of cars 9 to 11 had 2+2 seating. The trains had a total seating capacity of 1,235 passengers. [9]

Pre-refurbishment

Post-refurbishment

History

An E1 series train in original livery in November 2004 Shinkansen-e1.jpg
An E1 series train in original livery in November 2004

The first E1 series set, M1, was delivered to Sendai Depot on 3 March 1994, sporting "DDS E1" logos (DDS standing for double-deck shinkansen). [10] ローカル鉄道途中下車の旅 The first two E1 series sets delivered entered revenue-earning service on the Tohoku Shinkansen on 15 July 1994, with the original "DDS" logos replaced by "Max" logos. [3] The original livery was "sky grey" on the upper body side and "silver grey" on the lower body side, separated by a "peacock green" stripe. [5]

From 4 December 1999, all six trainsets were transferred from Sendai Depot to Niigata Depot, with operations limited to use on Joetsu Shinkansen Max Asahi and Max Tanigawa services only. [5]

Refurbishment

Refurbished set M4 in May 2008 JR East Shinkansen E1(renewal).jpg
Refurbished set M4 in May 2008

From late 2003, the fleet underwent refurbishment, which included the installation of new seating and repainting in a new livery of "stratus white" on the upper body side and "aster blue" on the lower body side, separated by a "ibis pink" stripe.

All cars were made no-smoking from the start of the revised timetable on 18 March 2007. [5]

Withdrawal

Withdrawn E1 series shinkansen cars awaiting scrapping at Sendai General Shinkansen Depot in October 2012 E1 Sendai 20121006.jpg
Withdrawn E1 series shinkansen cars awaiting scrapping at Sendai General Shinkansen Depot in October 2012

The first two sets were officially withdrawn in April 2012: M1 on 2 April, and M2 on 14 April. [8] The remaining fleet was withdrawn from service from the start of the revised timetable on 29 September 2012. [2]

A special Thank you Max Asahi (ありがとうMaxあさひ号, Arigatō Max Asahi-gō) service ran from Niigata to Tokyo on 27 October 2012 using an E1 series set, [11] followed by a final run from Tokyo to Niigata on 28 October 2012, using set M4. [12]

Bodyside logos

Between 1 December 2001 and 31 March 2002, the E1 series fleet was adorned with "Alpen Super Express" logos as part of JR East's "JR + Snow" promotional campaign. [3]

From mid August 2012 until the fleet's final withdrawal on 28 September, the remaining three sets had a second toki crested ibis added to their logos to celebrate the rare hatching of ibis chicks in the wild. [13]

Preserved examples

E1 Series Shinkansen static display at Railway Museum in Saitama. E1 Shinkansen the railway museum.jpg
E1 Series Shinkansen static display at Railway Museum in Saitama.

One E1 series car is preserved: car E153-104 of set M4. This was moved to the Railway Museum in Saitama in December 2017, and is on display since spring 2018. [14]

See also

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