EPPO Code

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EPPO Code
Full nameEuropean and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization Code
Organisation European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization
Example CARPPO
Website gd.eppo.int

An EPPO code, formerly known as a Bayer code, is an encoded identifier that is used by the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO), in a system designed to uniquely identify organisms – namely plants, pests and pathogens – that are important to agriculture and crop protection. EPPO codes are a core component of a database of names, both scientific and vernacular. Although originally started by the Bayer Corporation, the official list of codes is now maintained by EPPO. [1]

Contents

EPPO code database

All codes and their associated names are included in a database (EPPO Global Database). In total, there are over 68,500 species listed in the EPPO database, including: [2]

Plants are identified by a five-letter code, other organisms by a six-letter one. In many cases the codes are mnemonic abbreviations of the scientific name of the organism, derived from the first three or four letters of the genus and the first two letters of the species. [3] For example, corn, or maize ( Zea mays ), was assigned the code "ZEAMA"; the code for potato late blight ( Phytophthora infestans ) is "PHYTIN". The unique and constant code for each organism provides a shorthand method of recording specie. The EPPO code avoids many of the problems caused by revisions to scientific names and taxonomy which often result in different synonyms being in use for the same species. When the taxonomy changes, the EPPO code stays the same. [3] The EPPO system is used by governmental organizations, conservation agencies, and researchers. [4] [5]

Example

Taxonomic RankExample taxonEPPO Code
KingdomAnimalia1ANIMK
 PhylumArthropoda1ARTHP
 SubphylumHexapoda1HEXAQ
 ClassInsecta1INSEC
 OrderHemiptera1HEMIO
 SuborderSternorrhyncha1STERR
 FamilyAleyrodidae1ALEYF
 GenusBemisia1BEMIG
 SpeciesBemisia tabaciBEMITA

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References

  1. "EPPO Codes: view a presentation" (PDF). European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 March 2016. Retrieved 10 June 2015.
  2. "EPPO Codes: a brief description" (PDF). European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 March 2016. Retrieved 8 June 2015.
  3. 1 2 "EPPO Codes". www.eppo.int. EPPO.
  4. Francis, A; Warwick, S I (July 2009). "The Biology of Canadian Weeds. 142. Camelina alyssum (Mill.) Thell.; C. microcarpa Andrz. ex DC.; C. sativa (L.) Crantz". Canadian Journal of Plant Science. 89 (4): 791–810. doi:10.4141/CJPS08185.
  5. Mair, Wesley; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco; Stammler, Gerd; Clark, William; Burnett, Fiona; Hollomon, Derek; Ishii, Hideo; Thind, Tarlochan S; Brown, James KM; Fraaije, Bart; Cools, Hans; Shaw, Michael; Fillinger, Sabine; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Mellado, Emilia; Schnabel, Guido; Mehl, Andreas; Oliver, Richard P (August 2016). "Proposal for a unified nomenclature for target-site mutations associated with resistance to fungicides". Pest Management Science. 72 (8): 1449–1459. doi:10.1002/ps.4301. PMC   5094580 . PMID   27148866.