Earl Krieger

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Earl Krieger
Earl Krieger.png
Krieger pictured in Athena 1920, Ohio yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1896-08-30)August 30, 1896
Columbus, Ohio
DiedNovember 10, 1960(1960-11-10) (aged 64)
Bexley, Ohio
Playing career
Football
1918–1919 Ohio
1921 Detroit Tigers
1922 Columbus Panhandles
Basketball
1919–1920 Ohio
Position(s) End, fullback, halfback (football)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1920 Tennessee (backfield)
1921 Bowling Green
Basketball
1921–1922 Bowling Green
Baseball
1922 Bowling Green
Head coaching record
Overall3–1–1 (football)
4–10 (basketball)
7–1 (baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 NOL (1921)

Earl Carlton "Irish" Krieger (August 30, 1896 – November 10, 1960) was an American football and basketball player, coach of football, basketball, and baseball, and official in football and basketball. He was the third head football coach at Bowling Green State Normal School—now known as Bowling Green State University—serving for one season in 1921 and compiling a record of 3–1–1. Krieger was also the head basketball coach at Bowling Green State Normal during the 1921–22 season, tallying a mark of 4–10, and the school's head baseball coach in the spring of 1922, notching a record of 7–1. Krieger played college football at Ohio University, from which he graduated in 1920. He played professional football in the National Football League (NFL), for the Detroit Tigers in 1921 and the Columbus Panhandles in 1922.

Contents

In addition to coaching at Bowling Green, Krieger was also a member of the football coaching staffs at his alma mater and at the University of Tennessee. For 25 years until his retirement in 1953, he worked as a football and basketball official for the Big Ten Conference. He was also a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's football rules committee. Krieger died at the age of 64 on November 10, 1960. [1]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Bowling Green Normals (Northwest Ohio League)(1921)
1921 Bowling Green 3–1–13–01st
Bowling Green:3–1–13–0
Total:3–1–1
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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1936 in Michigan

Events from the year 1936 in Michigan.

The 1921 Bowling Green Normals football team was an American football team that represented Bowling Green State Normal School as a member of the Northwest Ohio League (NOL) during the 1921 college football season. In its third season of intercollegiate football, Bowling Green compiled a 3–1–1 record and outscored opponents by a total of 178 to 34. Earl Krieger was the head coach, and Franklin "Gus" Skibbie was the team captain.

References

  1. "E. C. Krieger of Big Ten Dead; Interpreter of Football Rules, 64" (PDF). The New York Times . Associated Press. November 11, 1960. Retrieved November 21, 2011.