East Midlands Ambulance Service

Last updated

East Midlands Ambulance Service
EMAS
Type Ambulance services trust
Established1999
Headquarters Nottingham, Nottinghamshire
Region served Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Rutland, Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire
NHS region NHS England
Area size6,425 sq miles
Population4.8 million
Establishments70 sites including two control rooms
Budget£158 million (2017/18)
ChairPauline Tagg
Chief executiveRichard Henderson
Website www.emas.nhs.uk OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

The East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EMAS) provides emergency medical services, urgent care and patient transport services for the 4.8 million people within the East Midlands region of the UK - covering Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire (except Glossop, Hadfield and Tintwistle), Leicestershire, Rutland, Lincolnshire (including North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire) and Northamptonshire. It was formed in 1999 by amalgamating several county ambulance services, [1] and in July 2006 was dissolved and reformed under the same name as part of a nationwide reorganisation of ambulance service provision. [2] [3]

Contents

Two of the vehicles operated by the East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust.jpg
Two of the vehicles operated by the East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust

Performance

In 201617, EMAS received over 938,837 emergency 999 calls with ambulance clinicians dispatched to 653,215 incidents. [4]

EMAS employs about 3,290 staff at more than 70 locations, including two control rooms at Nottingham and Lincoln - the largest staff group are those who provide accident and emergency responses to 999 calls. [4]

In 2013, EMAS took on 140 new emergency care assistants. [5] In 2014, EMAS announced they were bringing back the ambulance technician role. [6]

In 201011, EMAS missed key performance targets after a cold spell brought snow and ice. [7] By June 2015, EMAS had failed to meet their category 1 response times for the fifth successive year. [8]

In December 2019, ambulance staff spent 13,057 hours waiting at hospitals for the pre-handover of patients, more than double the time spend in December 2018. [9]

CQC performance rating

In its last inspection of the service in April 2019, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) gave the following ratings on a scale of outstanding (the service is performing exceptionally well), good (the service is performing well and meeting our expectations), requires improvement (the service isn't performing as well as it should) and inadequate (the service is performing badly):

Inspection Reports
Area2016 Rating [10] 2017 Rating [11] 2019 Rating [12]
Are services Safe?InadequateRequires improvementGood
Are services Effective?Requires improvementRequires improvementGood
Are services CaringOutstandingN/AOutstanding
Are services ResponsiveGoodN/AGood
Are services Well-ledRequires improvementRequires improvementGood
Overall ratingRequires improvementRequires improvementGood

Funding

EMAS previously provided patient transport services until contracts worth £20 million per year were taken over in 2012 by two private sector companies. [13] In 2012−13, EMAS had a budget of £148M. [14] The trust spent £4.3M on voluntary and private ambulance services in 201314 for support in busy periods. [15]

In 2015, the service also faced a drop in annual funding of around £6M. [16]

In October 2014, the trust decided to spend £88,000 on upgrading its computer equipment. [17]

In 2018, the trust said it would need an extra £20M a year to meet the new ambulance performance standards. [18]

See also

Related Research Articles

London Ambulance Service Ambulance service in London

The London Ambulance Service NHS Trust (LAS) is an NHS trust responsible for operating ambulances and answering and responding to urgent and emergency medical situations within the London region of England. The service responds to 999 phone calls across the region, and 111 phone calls from certain parts, providing triage and advice to enable an appropriate level of response.

South East Coast Ambulance Service Provider of ambulance services for south-eastern England

The South East Coast Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (SECAmb) is the NHS ambulance services trust for south-eastern England, covering Kent, Surrey, West Sussex and East Sussex. It also covers a part of north-eastern Hampshire around Aldershot, Farnborough, Fleet and Yateley. The service was made an NHS foundation trust on 1 March 2011.

North West Ambulance Service Ambulance service for North West England

The North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust (NWAS) is the ambulance service for North West England. It is one of ten ambulance trusts providing England with Emergency medical services, and is part of the National Health Service, receiving direct government funding for its role.

South Western Ambulance Service UK ambulance service

The South Western Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (SWASFT) is the organisation responsible for providing ambulance services for the National Health Service (NHS) across South West England. It serves the council areas of Bath and North East Somerset, Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council, Bristol, Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, North Somerset, Plymouth, Isles of Scilly, Somerset, South Gloucestershire, Swindon, Torbay and Wiltshire.

Yorkshire Ambulance Service UK public sector provider of ambulance services in Yorkshire, England (2006- )

The Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust (YAS) is the NHS ambulance service covering most of Yorkshire in England. It is one of ten NHS Ambulance Trusts providing England with emergency medical services as part of the National Health Service it receives direct government funding for its role.

South Central Ambulance Service Regional ambulance service in England

The South Central Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (SCAS) is the ambulance service for the counties of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Hampshire. It is a foundation trust of the National Health Service, and one of ten NHS ambulance trusts in England.

East of England Ambulance Service Ambulance service in England

The East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EEAST) is an NHS trust responsible for providing National Health Service (NHS) ambulance services in the counties of Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk and Suffolk, in the East of England region. These consist of approximately 6.2 million people across an area of 7,500 square miles (19,000 km2).

North East Ambulance Service UK public sector ambulance service

The North East Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (NEAS) is an NHS foundation trust responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in North East England. Headquartered in Newcastle upon Tyne, NEAS provides emergency medical services to the metropolitan boroughs of Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, North Tyneside, South Tyneside and City of Sunderland; the ceremonial counties of County Durham and Northumberland; and the area of North Yorkshire commonly known as Teesside. NEAS was formed on 1 July 2006, following the merger of the existing North East Ambulance Service with the Tees division of the Tees, East and North Yorkshire Ambulance Service (TENYAS). Northumbria Ambulance Service and County Durham Ambulance Service had previously merged on 1 April 1999.

West Midlands Ambulance Service Ambulance trust in England

The West Midlands Ambulance Service University NHS Foundation Trust (WMAS) is responsible for providing NHS ambulance services within the West Midlands region of England. It is one of ten ambulance trusts providing England with emergency medical services, and is part of the National Health Service.

Emergency medical services in the United Kingdom Overview of emergency medical services in the United Kingdom

Emergency medical services in the United Kingdom provide emergency care to people with acute illness or injury and are predominantly provided free at the point of use by the four National Health Services (NHS) of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Emergency care including ambulance and emergency department treatment is only free to UK residents and a charge may be made to those not entitled to free NHS care. The NHS commissions most emergency medical services through the 14 NHS organisations with ambulance responsibility across the UK.

National Health Service ambulance services provide free at the point of use emergency medical care to any person requiring treatment, regardless of immigration or visitor status, within the United Kingdom. These services are provided by National Health Services of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The current system comprises 14 NHS organisations: 11 ambulance services trusts cover the separate regions of England and; individual nationwide services cover Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland respectively.

Healthcare in the United Kingdom is a devolved matter, with England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales each having their own systems of publicly funded healthcare, funded by and accountable to separate governments and parliaments, together with smaller private sector and voluntary provision. As a result of each country having different policies and priorities, a variety of differences have developed between these systems since devolution.

An emergency care assistant (ECA) is a type of NHS ambulance service worker in the United Kingdom, often used to support paramedics in responding to emergency calls.

Lincolnshire & Nottinghamshire Air Ambulance English charity air ambulance

The Lincs & Notts Air Ambulance is an air ambulance based at RAF Waddington which covers the administrative counties of Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire and the unitary authorities of Nottingham, North East Lincolnshire and North Lincolnshire, England. The Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire Air Ambulance Charitable Trust is a registered charity that derives a large percentage of its funding from donations.

111 is a free-to-call single non-emergency number medical helpline operating in England, Scotland and parts of Wales. The 111 phone service has replaced the various non-geographic 0845 rate numbers and is part of each country's National Health Service: in England the service is known as NHS 111; in Scotland, NHS 24; and in Wales, 111.

United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust is an NHS trust which runs County Hospital Louth, Lincoln County Hospital, Pilgrim Hospital in Boston, Skegness and District Hospital, and Grantham and District Hospital.

NHS Pathways

NHS Pathways is a triage software utilised by the National Health Service of England to triage public telephone calls for medical care and emergency medical services – such as 999 or 111 calls – in some NHS trusts and five of the ambulance services in the country. In its emergency capacity, it has replaced the Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System for some trusts, and in non-emergency telephone triage it is found in many medical care triage systems, such as NHS 111.

Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust was formed in 2001 and gained Foundation Trust status in 2007. It runs three hospitals in Nottinghamshire - King's Mill Hospital, Newark Hospital and Mansfield Community Hospital. It also operates services from Ashfield Health Village.

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust is an NHS trust which runs three hospitals in Worcestershire, England: The Alexandra Hospital, Redditch, Kidderminster Hospital and Treatment Centre in Kidderminster, Evesham hospital Burlingham ward in Evesham and the Worcestershire Royal Hospital in Worcester.

Out-of-hours services are the arrangements to provide access to healthcare at times when General Practitioner surgeries are closed; in the United Kingdom this is normally between 6.30pm and 8am, at weekends, at Bank Holidays and sometimes if the practice is closed for educational sessions.

References

  1. "The East Midlands Ambulance Service National Health Service Trust (Establishment) Order 1999". gov.uk.
  2. "The National Health Service Trusts (Dissolution) Order 2006". gov.uk.
  3. "The East Midlands Ambulance Service National Health Service Trust (Establishment) Order 2006". gov.uk.
  4. 1 2 East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust (30 June 2018). "East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust - Overview". nhs.uk. NHS. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  5. "East Midlands Ambulance Service fined for third successive year". BBC News. 22 May 2013.
  6. "East Midlands Ambulance: Increase in paramedic stress". BBC News. 19 December 2014.
  7. "East Midlands Ambulance Service worst in England". BBC News. 23 June 2011.
  8. "East Midlands Ambulance Service miss targets for fifth year". BBC News. 16 June 2015.
  9. "Trust's ambulance crews lose 18 months waiting at hospitals". Health Service Journal. 14 January 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  10. "East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust: Quality Report". Care Quality Commission. 10 May 2016. Retrieved 25 January 2022.
  11. "East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust: Quality Report". Care Quality Commission. 13 June 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2022.
  12. "Provider: East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust". Care Quality Commission . Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  13. "East Midlands Ambulance Service loses £130m contract". BBC News . 10 December 2011.
  14. "East Midlands Ambulance Service: Private ambulance surge defended". BBC News. 9 August 2013.
  15. "Nearly £8 million cost of private ambulances to cope with 999 demand". Leicester Mercury. 30 January 2015. Archived from the original on 8 February 2015. Retrieved 8 February 2015.
  16. Crowson, Isaac (31 October 2015). "Nigel Mills MP demands 'urgent action' from East Midlands Ambulance Service over response times". Derby Telegraph . Archived from the original on 13 December 2015. Retrieved 15 December 2015.
  17. "New computer systems for Nottinghamshire's ambulance service after 42,000 patients' files lost". Nottingham Post. 30 October 2014. Archived from the original on 1 December 2014. Retrieved 15 December 2015.
  18. "Ambulance trusts demand millions to meet new targets". Health Service Journal. 4 May 2018. Retrieved 13 August 2018.