East Norwalk Historical Cemetery

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East Norwalk Historical Cemetery
Details
Established c. 1655
Location East Norwalk, Connecticut
Country United States
Owned by Norwalk's Third Taxing District
No. of interments 1100
Website East Norwalk Historical Cemetery
Find a Grave East Norwalk Historical Cemetery

Established in 1655, the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery is Norwalk's oldest cemetery, and many of the area's first settlers are buried there. The cemetery is owned and maintained by the Third Taxing District, formally known as the East Norwalk Fire District of the Town of Norwalk, and before that it was known as the Down Town School District. [1] Triangle shaped and surrounded clockwise by Gregory Boulevard, Cemetery Street and East Avenue it is situated in the neighborhood of East Norwalk 41°6′9.22″N73°24′11.95″W / 41.1025611°N 73.4033194°W / 41.1025611; -73.4033194 Coordinates: 41°6′9.22″N73°24′11.95″W / 41.1025611°N 73.4033194°W / 41.1025611; -73.4033194 .

Norwalk, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Norwalk is a U.S. city located in southwestern Connecticut, in southern Fairfield County, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound. Norwalk is included statistically within both the New York metropolitan area as well as the Bridgeport metropolitan area.

Settler person who has migrated to an area and established permanent residence there

A settler is a person who has migrated to an area and established a permanent residence there, often to colonize the area. Settlers are generally from a sedentary culture, as opposed to nomads who share and rotate their settlements with little or no concept of individual land ownership. Settlements are often built on land already claimed or owned by another group. Many times settlers are backed by governments or large countries. They also sometimes leave in search of religious freedom.

East Norwalk Neighborhood in Fairfield, Connecticut, United States

East Norwalk is a neighborhood of Norwalk, Connecticut, located mostly in Norwalk's third taxing district with segments of its northernmost area within the first and fifth taxing districts. As one of the earliest settlements of Norwalk, it was so marked with a block of 'suitably inscribed' 'native granite' formally located on the corner of Fitch Street and East Avenue.

Contents

First Settlers of Norwalk Memorial First settlers norwalk.jpg
First Settlers of Norwalk Memorial

At the north entrance of the grounds stands the First Settlers of Norwalk Memorial, [2] inscribed with the following names of 31 settlers who founded Norwalk in 1649:

George Abbitt, Robert Beacham, Stephen Beckwith, John Bowton, Matthew Campfield, Nathaniel Eli, Thomas Fitch, John Griggorie, Samuel Hales, Thomas Hales, Walter Haite, Nathaniel Haies, Rev. Thomas Hanford, Richard Homes, Ralph Keiler, Daniel Kellogge, Thomas Lupton, Matthew Marvin, Sr., Matthew Marvin, Jr., Isacke More, Jonathan Marsh, Widow Morgan, Richard Olmsted, Nathaniel Richards, John Ruskoe, Matthias Sention, Sr., Matthias Sention, Jr., Matthew Sention, Thomas Seamer, Richard Webb, and Walter Keiler.

George Abbitt (1634–1689) was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut.

Robert Beacham was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut.

Stephen Beckwith was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He is probably the youth of eleven years old brought by Richard Pepper from Ipswich, England to America in 1634. He was at Hartford in 1649, and moved to Norwalk prior to 1655. He sold his farm to Richard Homes in March 1663. He was still living in Norwalk as late as 1687.

Many graves are unmarked by headstones as remains were deposited before stones were available, and of which no mark or tradition is known.

Grave Burial location of a dead body

A grave is a location where a dead body is buried. Graves are usually located in special areas set aside for the purpose of burial, such as graveyards or cemeteries.

Headstone sepulchral monument

A headstone, tombstone, or gravestone is a stele or marker, usually stone, that is placed over a grave. They are traditional for burials in the Christian, Jewish and Muslim religions, among others. In most cases they have the deceased's name, date of birth, and date of death inscribed on them, along with a personal message, or prayer, but they may contain pieces of funerary art, especially details in stone relief. In many parts of Europe insetting a photograph of the deceased in a frame is very common.

In 1843, the Down Town Cemetery Association was founded to maintain and conduct the business of the cemetery. In 1933, the name was changed to the East Norwalk Cemetery Association. In 1941, the Norwalk Third Taxing District entered into an agreement to supplement the association's perpetual care fund, due to a dwindling amount of donations. In 1966, the district took the deed to the land, so as to secure better insurance. Today, the district provides for the perpetual care of the grounds, while cemetery business is conducted by volunteers of the association.

Notable burials

The table tomb of Governor Thomas Fitch Fitch table tomb.jpg
The table tomb of Governor Thomas Fitch

John Bowton was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1671, October 1673, May 1674, May 1675, October 1676, May and October 1677, May 1678, October 1679, May 1680, May 1681, May and October 1682. May 1683, and May and October 1685.

John Copp was a member of the House of Representatives of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of May 1706, May 1716, October 1718, and May 1719. He served from 1708 to 1740 as the town clerk of Norwalk. He was one of the purchasers of the land for the present town of Ridgefield, Connecticut from the Ramapoo Indians, as well as the town's clerk and surveyor. He also laid out the lots and roads of the present town of Bedford, New York.

Ridgefield, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Ridgefield is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. Situated in the foothills of the Berkshire Mountains, the 300-year-old community had a population of 24,638 at the 2010 census. The town center, which was formerly a borough, is defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census-designated place.

See also

History of Norwalk, Connecticut

The history of Norwalk, Connecticut ranges from pre-contact cultures and Native Americans to the 21st century.

Mill Hill Historic Park museum complex in Norwalk, Connecticut

Mill Hill Historic Park in Norwalk, Connecticut is a living history museum composed of three buildings: the circa 1740 Governor Thomas Fitch IV "law office", the circa 1826 Downtown District Schoolhouse, and the 1835 Norwalk Town Hall; as well as a historic cemetery also called the Town House Hill Cemetery. The museum is also known as the Mill Hill Historical Complex in some references and the sign at the parking lot reads Norwalk Mill Hill Museum.

Pine Island Cemetery is a historical cemetery in Norwalk, Connecticut. It is the second oldest cemetery in Norwalk. The cemetery is located behind Lockwood–Mathews Mansion on Crescent Street.

Related Research Articles

Richard Olmsted was a founding settler of both Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served in the General Court of the Connecticut Colony in the sessions of May 1653, October 1654, May 1658, October 1660, May 1662, May and October 1663, May and October 1664, October 1665, May and October 1666, May 1667, May and October 1668, May 1669, May 1671, and May 1679.

Matthew Marvin Sr. was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the May 1654 session. He served as a magistrate in 1659.

John Gregory was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony in the sessions of October 1659, October 1662, May 1663, May 1665, October 1667, May 1668, May and October 1669, October 1670, October 1671, May 1674, May 1675, October 1677, May 1679, October 1680, May 1681, October 1695.

Thomas Fitch, Jr. was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Connecticut Colony representing Norwalk in the May 1673 session.

Nathaniel Haies was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a signer of the treaty with the Norwalke Indians in 1655.

Thomas Hanford was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was the first minister in Norwalk, and continued in charge of the settlement's church for forty-one years, until his death in 1693. In addition to his spiritual leadership, he also served as the civic leader and school teacher of the settlement.

Matthew Marvin Jr. was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of May 1694, and May and October 1697.

Ralph Keeler was a founding settler of both Hartford, and Norwalk, Connecticut, United States.

Jonathan Marsh (1621–1672) was a founding settler of the New Haven Colony, and of Norwalk, Connecticut. He came to Norwalk from New Haven sometime prior to March 1656. He was the settlement's miller.

Matthias Sention Sr. was a founding settler of Dorchester, Massachusetts, of Windsor, Connecticut, of Wethersfield, Connecticut and of Norwalk, Connecticut.

Matthias Sention Jr. was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut.

Walter Keeler was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. There is very little information on him in the historical records. He is listed among the "Table of Estates" settlers of 1655. He is the brother of Ralph Keeler, the Norwalk settler who is listed among the "Ludlow Agreement" settlers of 1650.

Matthew Sention, may refer to

Samuel Smith was an early settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the May 1691 session.

John Belding was an early settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a member of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1691 and May 1705.

Samuel Keeler was a member of the House of Representatives of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1701, October 1703, May 1704, May 1706, May 1709 and October 1709. He is listed as a founding settler of Ridgefield, Connecticut on the founders monument in Ye Burying Ground cemetery in Ridgefield.

Matthew Seymour was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1712, and October 1713. He was one of the founding settlers of Ridgefield, Connecticut.

References

  1. "History". Third Taxing District. JumarMarketing, LLC. Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  2. "First Settlers of Norwalk Memorial". Find a Grave. Retrieved 14 January 2017.

Further reading