East Pyramids

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East Pyramids
Mutton Bird Islands (Landsat).jpg
A Landsat image of the Mutton Bird Islands Group; the East Pyramids are located on the far left.
Relief Map of Tasmania.png
Red pog.svg
East Pyramids
Location off the south western coast of Tasmania
Geography
Location South western Tasmania
Coordinates 43°24′36″S145°54′36″E / 43.41000°S 145.91000°E / -43.41000; 145.91000 Coordinates: 43°24′36″S145°54′36″E / 43.41000°S 145.91000°E / -43.41000; 145.91000
ArchipelagoMutton Bird Islands Group
Adjacent bodies of water Southern Ocean
Total islands3
Area6.69 ha (16.5 acres) [1]
Administration
Australia
State Tasmania
Region South West
Demographics
PopulationUnpopulated

The East Pyramids comprise a group of three steep, rocky unpopulated islets located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. Situated some 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) south of where the mouth of Port Davey meets the Southern Ocean, the 6.69-hectare (16.5-acre) islets are one of the eight islands that comprise the Mutton Bird Islands Group. The East Pyramids are part of the Southwest National Park and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site. [1] [2]

Islet Very small island

An islet is a very small island.

South West Tasmania is a region in Tasmania that has evoked curiosity as to its resources over the duration of European presence on the island.

Tasmania island state of Australia

Tasmania is an island state of Australia. It is located 240 km (150 mi) to the south of the Australian mainland, separated by Bass Strait. The state encompasses the main island of Tasmania, the 26th-largest island in the world, and the surrounding 334 islands. The state has a population of around 533,308 as of March 2019. Just over forty percent of the population resides in the Greater Hobart precinct, which forms the metropolitan area of the state capital and largest city, Hobart.

Contents

Flora and fauna

The islets are part of the Port Davey Islands Important Bird Area, so identified by BirdLife International because of its importance for breeding seabirds. [3] What vegetation there is on these rocks is dominated by Poa , pig face and ferns. Recorded breeding seabird species are the fairy prion (100 pairs), Pacific gull, silver gull and black-faced cormorant. [2]

Port Davey Islands Important Bird Area

The Port Davey Islands Important Bird Area comprises over 20 small, rocky islands scattered both within, and in the vicinity of, the mouth of Port Davey, an inlet on the south-west coast of Tasmania, Australia. They all lie within the Southwest National Park and are important for breeding seabirds.

BirdLife International is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds, their habitats, and global biodiversity, working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations.

<i>Poa</i> genus of plants

Poa is a genus of about 500 species of grasses, native to the temperate regions of both hemispheres. Common names include meadow-grass, bluegrass, tussock, and speargrass. Poa (πόα) is Greek for "fodder". Poa are members of the subfamily Pooideae of the family Poaceae.

See also

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South West Mutton Bird Islet

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Sugarmouse Island island in Tasmania, Australia

Sugarmouse Island is an unpopulated islet located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. Situated some 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) south of where the mouth of Port Davey meets the Southern Ocean, the 0.54-hectare (1.3-acre) islet is one of the eight islands that comprise the Mutton Bird Islands Group. Sugarmouse Island is part of the Southwest National Park and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site.

Sugarloaf Rock (Mutton Bird Group)

The Sugarloaf Rock is a steep, rocky unpopulated islet located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. Situated some 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) south of where the mouth of Port Davey meets the Southern Ocean, the 3.56-hectare (8.8-acre) islet is one of the eight islands that comprise the Mutton Bird Islands Group. The Sugarloaf Rock is part of the Southwest National Park and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site.

Wendar Island island in Tasmania, Australia

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Swainson Island island in Tasmania, Australia

Swainson Island is an unpopulated island with an adjacent islet, located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. Situated near where the mouth of Port Davey meets the Southern Ocean, the 4.14-hectare (10.2-acre) island is part of the Swainson Islands Group, and comprises part of the Southwest National Park and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site.

Hay Island (Tasmania) island in Tasmania, Australia

The Hay Island is an unpopulated island located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. Situated near where the mouth of Port Davey meets the Southern Ocean, the 1.85-hectare (4.6-acre) island with an elevation of 78 metres (256 ft) above sea level, is part of the Swainson Islands Group, and comprises part of the Southwest National Park and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site.

Lourah Island island in Tasmania, Australia

Lourah Island is an unpopulated island located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. Situated within Port Davey, the 4.86-hectare (12.0-acre) island is part of the Swainson Islands Group, and comprises part of the Southwest National Park and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site.

Fitzroy Islands (Tasmania)

The Fitzroy Islands comprise a group of four rocky islets that lie within the upper reaches of Payne Bay in Port Davey, an oceanic inlet, located in the south west region of Tasmania, Australia. The islands have a combined area of approximately 0.18 hectares and are contained with the Southwest National Park, part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site and the Port Davey/Bathurst Harbour Marine Nature Reserve.

Mavourneen Rocks island in Tasmania, Australia

The Mavourneen Rocks is a group of four steep, rocky islets that lie within Port Davey, an oceanic inlet, located in the south west region of Tasmania, Australia. The islets have a combined area of approximately 0.88 hectares and are contained with the Southwest National Park, part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site and the Port Davey/Bathurst Harbour Marine Nature Reserve.

The Coffee Pot (Tasmania)

The Coffee Pot, also known simply as Coffee Pot, with a shape suggesting a coffee pot, is an unpopulated steep, rocky islet located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. Situated some 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) northwest of where the mouth of Port Davey meets the Southern Ocean, the 0.31-hectare (0.77-acre) islet is part of the Trumpeter Islets Group, and comprises part of the Southwest National Park and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site.

West Pyramid island in Tasmania, Australia

West Pyramid is an unpopulated steep-sided island located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. Situated some 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) north of the mouth of Port Davey where it meets the Southern Ocean, the 2.5-hectare (6.2-acre) island is part of the Trumpeter Islets Group, and comprises part of the Southwest National Park and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site.

Hobbs Island (Tasmania) island in Tasmania, Australia

Hobbs Island, also known as Green Island, is an unpopulated island located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. Situated some 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) north of where the mouth of Port Davey meets the Southern Ocean, the 9.7-hectare (24-acre) island is part of the Trumpeter Islets Group, and comprises part of the Southwest National Park and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Site.

References

  1. 1 2 "Small Southern Islands Conservation Management Statement 2002" (PDF). Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service. 2002. p. 30. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 August 2006. Retrieved 20 July 2006.
  2. 1 2 Brothers, Nigel; Pemberton, David; Pryor, Helen; Halley, Vanessa (2001). Tasmania’s Offshore Islands: seabirds and other natural features. Hobart: Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. ISBN   0-7246-4816-X.
  3. "IBA: Port Davey Islands". Birdata. Birds Australia. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 19 September 2011.