East Spanish Peak

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East Spanish Peak
Spanish Peaks.JPG
East (left) and West (right) Spanish Peaks
Highest point
Elevation 12,688 ft (3,867 m) [1] [2]
Prominence 2,383 ft (726 m) [2]
Parent peak West Spanish Peak [2]
Isolation 4.21 mi (6.78 km) [2]
Listing Colorado prominent summits
Coordinates 37°23′36″N104°55′12″W / 37.393404°N 104.9200632°W / 37.393404; -104.9200632 Coordinates: 37°23′36″N104°55′12″W / 37.393404°N 104.9200632°W / 37.393404; -104.9200632 [3]
Geography
USA Colorado relief location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
East Spanish Peak
Location Huerfano and Las Animas counties, Colorado, United States [4]
Parent range Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Spanish Peaks [2]
Topo map USGS 7.5' topographic map
Spanish Peaks, Colorado [3]
Climbing
Easiest route West Ridge: hike/scramble class 2

East Spanish Peak is a prominent mountain summit that is the lower of the two Spanish Peaks in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 12,688-foot (3,867 m) peak is located in the Spanish Peaks Wilderness of San Isabel National Forest, 9.3 miles (14.9 km) southeast by south (bearing 148°) of the Town of La Veta, Colorado, United States, on the drainage divide between Huerfano and Las Animas counties. [1] [2] [4] [3] The Spanish Peaks are two large igneous stocks which form an eastern outlier of the Culebra Range, a subrange of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. East Spanish Peak is higher than any point in the United States east of its longitude; it is also the easternmost point in the United States over 12,000 feet (3,700 m), 11,000 feet (3,400 m), and 10,000 feet (3,000 m) feet above sea level.

Contents

Geology

East Spanish Peak is the younger of the two Spanish Peaks stocks and was intruded 23.36 +/- 0.18 million years ago. The stock consists of a granite porphyry core surrounded by granodiorite porphyry. It is likely that the granite porphyry represents the upper portion of the magma chamber, the top of which eroded to expose at the summit the less-evolved larger portion of the magma chamber consisting of granodiorite porphyry. [5]

Hiking/climbing

The standard ascent route for East Spanish Peak ascends the west ridge of the peak from the saddle between it and West Spanish Peak. A trail ascends to the saddle from the north side of the peaks. [6]

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. 1 2 The elevation of East Spanish Peak includes an adjustment of +1.372 m (+4.50 ft) from NGVD 29 to NAVD 88.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "East Spanish Peak, Colorado". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved October 20, 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 "East Spanish Peak". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey . Retrieved October 20, 2014.
  4. 1 2 "East Spanish Peak". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved October 29, 2014.
  5. "Spanish Peaks" . Retrieved 2017-06-11.
  6. "East Spanish Peak". SummitPost.org. Retrieved 2011-05-15.