Ed Armbrister

Last updated
Ed Armbrister
Outfielder
Born: (1948-07-04) July 4, 1948 (age 71)
Nassau, Bahamas
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
August 31,  1973, for the  Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
October 2,  1977, for the  Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average .245
Home runs 4
Runs batted in 19
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Edison Rosanda Armbrister (born July 4, 1948 in Nassau, Bahamas) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball who had a five-year career from 1973 through 1977 with the Cincinnati Reds. Originally in the Houston Astros system, he was traded to the Reds in the deal that sent Joe Morgan, César Gerónimo, Denis Menke and Jack Billingham to Cincinnati for Lee May, Tommy Helms and Jimmy Stewart.

Contents

Armbrister is best remembered for his involvement in a controversial play in the 1975 World Series. In the tenth inning of Game Three, with César Gerónimo on base and nobody out, Armbrister collided with Boston Red Sox catcher Carlton Fisk at home plate while starting to run out a sacrifice bunt, leading to a wild throw by Fisk to second base that allowed Gerónimo to reach third base and eventually score the winning run; home plate umpire Larry Barnett did not make an interference call on Armbrister, a decision which was a source of heated debate after the Reds won the game 6–5.

After baseball, he returned to the Bahamas. He was a craps table croupier at Resorts International’s Paradise Island Casino and worked for at least one other establishment in the gaming business, a staple of the Bahamian tourist economy. As of 2006, he was with the Local Government and Consumer Affairs agency, on Arawak Cay, a popular attraction in the Nassau area. He also served as a consultant to the Ministry of Sports and managed the Bahamian junior national team. [1] In his downtime, Armbrister became a notable local softball player. [1]

In 2008, he was inducted into the Bahamas National Hall of Fame.

Sources

  1. 1 2 Ed Armbrister at the SABR Bio Project , by Rory Costello, retrieved November 16, 2013

Further reading

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