Ed Klieman

Last updated
Ed Klieman
Pitcher
Born:(1918-03-21)March 21, 1918
Norwood, Ohio
Died: November 15, 1979(1979-11-15) (aged 61)
Homosassa, Florida
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 24, 1943, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
June 2, 1950, for the Philadelphia Athletics
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 26-28
Earned run average 3.49
Strikeouts 130
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Edward Frederick "Specs" Klieman (March 21, 1918 – November 15, 1979) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1943 to 1950 for the Cleveland Indians, Washington Senators, Chicago White Sox, and Philadelphia Athletics. For his career, he compiled a 26–28 record in 222 appearances, with a 3.49 earned run average and 130 strikeouts. Klieman was a relief pitcher on the 1948 World Series champion Indians, pitching in one World Series game, giving up three runs without recording an out.

Professional baseball is played in leagues throughout the world. In these leagues and associated farm teams, baseball players are selected for their talents and are paid to play for a specific team or club system.

Pitcher the player responsible for throwing ("pitching") the ball to the batters in a game of baseball or softball

In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. The pitcher is often considered the most important player on the defensive side of the game, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum. There are many different types of pitchers, such as the starting pitcher, relief pitcher, middle reliever, lefty specialist, setup man, and the closer.

Major League Baseball Professional baseball league

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

He was born in Norwood, Ohio and later died in Homosassa, Florida at the age of 61.

Norwood, Ohio City in Ohio, United States

Norwood is the second most populous city in Hamilton County, Ohio, United States, and an enclave of the larger city of Cincinnati. The population was 19,207 at the 2010 census. Originally settled as an early suburb of Cincinnati in the wooded countryside north of the city, the area is characterized by older homes and tree-lined streets.

Homosassa, Florida Census-designated place in Florida, United States

Homosassa is a census-designated place (CDP) in Citrus County, Florida, United States. The population was 2,578 at the 2010 census.

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