Ed McGinley

Last updated
Ed McGinley
No. 10
Position: Tackle
Personal information
Born:(1899-08-09)August 9, 1899
Swarthmore, Pennsylvania
Died:April 16, 1985(1985-04-16) (aged 85)
Point Pleasant, New Jersey
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:185 lb (84 kg)
Career information
High school: Swarthmore
(Swarthmore, Pennsylvania)
College: Penn
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards

Edward Francis McGinley Jr. (August 9, 1899 – April 16, 1985) was an American football played and coach. He played college football as a tackle at the University of Pennsylvania and professionally for one season, in 1925, with the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL). McGinley also served as the head football coach at Saint Joseph's College—now known as Saint Joseph's University—in Philadelphia in 1925. [1] He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1979.

Contents

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Saint Joseph's Hawks (Independent)(1925)
1925 Saint Joseph's3–4
Saint Joseph's:3–4
Total:3–4

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References

  1. "Penn's All-American Star Will Handle Football Eleven of St. Joseph's College". The Philadelphia Inquirer . Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. February 6, 1925. p. 20. Retrieved December 26, 2020 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .