Ed Ott

Last updated
Ed Ott
Catcher
Born: (1951-07-11) July 11, 1951 (age 68)
Muncy, Pennsylvania
Batted: LeftThrew: Right
MLB debut
June 10, 1974, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1981, for the California Angels
MLB statistics
Batting average .259
Home runs 33
Runs batted in 195
Teams
As player
As coach
Career highlights and awards

Nathan Edward Ott (born July 11, 1951 in Muncy, Pennsylvania), is an American former professional baseball catcher and coach, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates and California Angels, between 1974 and 1981. He was a left-handed batter and threw right-handed. [1]

Muncy, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

Muncy is a borough in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, United States. The name Muncy comes from the Munsee Indians who once lived in the area. The population was 2,663 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Williamsport, Pennsylvania Metropolitan Statistical Area. Muncy is located on the West Branch Susquehanna River, just south of the confluence of Muncy Creek with the river.

Americans Citizens, or natives, of the United States of America

Americans are nationals and citizens of the United States of America. Although nationals and citizens make up the majority of Americans, some dual citizens, expatriates, and permanent residents may also claim American nationality. The United States is home to people of many different ethnic origins. As a result, American culture and law does not equate nationality with race or ethnicity, but with citizenship and permanent allegiance.

Professional baseball is played in leagues throughout the world. In these leagues and associated farm teams, baseball players are selected for their talents and are paid to play for a specific team or club system.

Contents

Major League career

Ott, who is unrelated to Hall of Famer Mel Ott, began his Major League career as a right fielder with the Pirates in 1974. [2] He converted to playing catcher in 1975, backing up Manny Sanguillén and Duffy Dyer. [3] The Pirates traded Sanguillen to the Oakland Athletics before the 1977 season, and new Pirates manager Chuck Tanner installed Ott into a platoon role alongside Dyer. He played in 104 games that year while hitting for a .264 batting average. [4] His batting average improved to .269 in 1978 while appearing in 112 games. [1]

Mel Ott American baseball player

Melvin Thomas Ott, nicknamed "Master Melvin", was an American professional baseball right fielder, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Giants, from 1926 through 1947.

Right fielder the outfielder in baseball or softball who plays defense in right field

A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball or softball who plays defense in right field. Right field is the area of the outfield to the right of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the right fielder is assigned the number 9.

The 1974 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 93rd season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; the 88th in the National League. The Pirates finished first in the National League East with a record of 88–74. The Pirates were defeated three games to one by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1974 National League Championship Series.

Ott platooned with catcher Steve Nicosia in 1979, and had his best season with a .273 batting average along with 7 home runs, 51 runs batted in and a career-high .994 fielding percentage, second only to Gene Tenace among National League catchers. [1] [5] Led by future Hall of Fame inductee, Willie Stargell, the 1979 Pirates won the National League Eastern Division pennant, then defeated the Cincinnati Reds in the 1979 National League Championship Series, before winning the 1979 World Series against the Baltimore Orioles. [6] [7] During the seven-game series, Ott posted a .333 batting average along with 3 runs batted in. [8]

Steven Richard Nicosia is a former catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, San Francisco Giants, Montreal Expos and Toronto Blue Jays during eight seasons spanning 1978–1985. Listed at 5' 10" and weighing 185 lb., Nicosia batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Paterson, New Jersey.

The 1979 Pittsburgh Pirates had 98 wins and 64 losses and captured the National League East Division title by two games over the Montreal Expos. The Pirates beat the Cincinnati Reds to win their ninth National League title, and the Baltimore Orioles to win their fifth World Series title – and also their last playoff series victory to date. The disco hit "We Are Family" by Sister Sledge was used as the team's theme song that season.

Home run in baseball, a 4-base hit, often by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles without 1st touching the ground; inside-the-park home runs—where the batter reaches home safely while the ball is in play—are possible but rare

In baseball, a home run is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to circle the bases and reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field. A home run with a high exit velocity and good launch angle is sometimes called a "no-doubter," because it leaves no doubt that it is going to leave the park when it leaves the bat.

With young catcher Tony Peña ready to take over the catching duties, the Pirates traded Ott to the California Angels in April 1981. [9] Ott had a down year in '81 batting just .217. He tore his rotator cuff in '82 and missed the entire year. After 16 minor league games spread across the '83 and '84 seasons, Ott retired.

Tony Peña Dominican baseball player

Antonio Francisco Peña Padilla is a Dominican former professional baseball player, manager and coach. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball for the Pirates, Cardinals, Red Sox, Indians, White Sox, and Astros. After his playing career, Peña was the manager of the Kansas City Royals between 2002 and 2005. He was most recently the first base coach for the New York Yankees. A four-time Gold Glove Award winner, Peña was known for his defensive abilities as well as his unorthodox squat behind home plate.

The California Angels 1981 season involved the Angels finishing with the 5th best overall record in the American League West with 51 wins and 59 losses. The season was suspended for 50 days due to the infamous 1981 players' strike and the league chose as its playoff teams the division winners from the first and second halves of the season.

Career statistics

In an eight-year major league career, Ott played in 567 games, accumulating 465 hits in 1,792 at bats for a .259 career batting average along with 33 home runs and 195 runs batted in. [1] He posted a .983 career fielding percentage. [1]

Games played is a statistic used in team sports to indicate the total number of games in which a player has participated ; the statistic is generally applied irrespective of whatever portion of the game is contested.

Hit (baseball) in baseball, hitting the ball into fair territory and safely reaching base without the benefit of an error or fielders choice

In baseball statistics, a hit, also called a base hit, is credited to a batter when the batter safely reaches first base after hitting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielder's choice.

In baseball statistics, fielding percentage, also known as fielding average, is a measure that reflects the percentage of times a defensive player properly handles a batted or thrown ball. It is calculated by the sum of putouts and assists, divided by the number of total chances.

Known as a tough, no-nonsense player, Ott was a former wrestler who was not afraid to use those skills on a baseball diamond. In an August 12, 1977, game against the New York Mets, Ott slid hard into Mets' second baseman Felix Millán trying to break up a double play. [10] Millán shouted at Ott and hit him with a baseball in his hand, and Ott answered by slamming him hard to the turf at Three Rivers Stadium, severely injuring his shoulder. [11]

The 1977 New York Mets season was the 16th regular season for the Mets, who played home games at Shea Stadium. Initially led by manager Joe Frazier followed by Joe Torre, the team had a 64–98 record and finished in last place for the first time since 1967, and for the first time since divisional play was introduced in 1969.

Double play making two outs during the same play in baseball

In baseball, a double play is the act of making two outs during the same continuous play. The double play is defined in the Official Rules in the Definitions of Terms, and for the official scorer in Rule 9.11. Double plays can occur any time there is at least one baserunner and fewer than two outs.

Coaching career

Ott later became a coach with the Houston Astros, serving under manager and former Pirates teammate Art Howe, from 1989 to 1993, where he is remembered for his role in an on-field altercation against the Cincinnati Reds. In 1991, Reds reliever Rob Dibble (part of the Reds Nasty Boys bullpen) ignited a brawl when he threw a pitch behind the back of the Astros' Eric Yelding, late in the game of a 4–1 Reds loss. A melee ensued and the 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m), 230 lb (100 kg), Dibble wound up on the bottom of a pile with the relatively diminutive Ott having put Dibble in such a choke hold that Dibble's face turned blue. [12] [13] Ott later coached for the Detroit Tigers (20012002).

Ott was named manager of the Sussex Skyhawks of the Canadian-American Association of Professional Baseball for the 2010 season. [14] He currently resides in Forest, Virginia. [15] Ott was formerly the pitching coach with the New Jersey Jackals of the Canadian-American Association of Professional Baseball. [16]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Ed Ott Stats". Baseball-Reference.com . Sports Reference LLC. 2019. Retrieved May 30, 2019.
  2. 1974 Pittsburgh Pirates season at Baseball Reference
  3. 1975 Pittsburgh Pirates season at Baseball Reference
  4. 1977 Pittsburgh Pirates season at Baseball Reference
  5. 1979 National League Fielding Leaders at Baseball Reference
  6. 1979 National League Championship Series at Baseball Reference
  7. 1979 World Series at Baseball Reference
  8. Ed Ott post-season batting statistics at Baseball Reference
  9. Ed Ott Trades and Transactions at Baseball Almanac
  10. August 12, 1977 Mets-Pirates box score at Baseball Reference
  11. Cards are chock full of memories, by David Vecsey at sports.espn.go.com
  12. Cincinnati Magazine, Emmis Communications, October 1992, Vol. 26, No. 1, ISSN 0746-8210
  13. Ross Newhan, Los Angeles Times, June 28,1992
  14. "Ed Ott Minor & Independent Leagues Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com . Sports Reference LLC. 2019. Retrieved May 30, 2019.
  15. Starkey, Joe (August 16, 2009). "The 1979 Pirates: Where are they now?". Pittsburgh Tribune-Review . Tribune-Review Publishing Company. Retrieved May 30, 2019.
  16. New Jersey Jackals Press Release February 9, 2011