Eddie Kushner

Last updated
Eddie Kushner
EKushner.png
Kushner pictured in the Winnipeg Free Press, November 11, 1938
Born:(1912-07-19)July 19, 1912
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Died:March 1, 1982(1982-03-01) (aged 69)
Vancouver, British Columbia
Career information
CFL status National
Position(s) G
Weight189 lb (86 kg)
Career history
As player
19331940 Winnipeg Blue Bombers
Career highlights and awards

Edward Maurice Kushner (July 19, 1912 March 1, 1982) was a Canadian football player who played for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers. He won the Grey Cup with Winnipeg in 1935 and 1939. [1] [2] He married Winnifred Ellen Cunliffe in 1936 and was alter a Chief Petty Officer in the Canadian Navy. [3] [4] He died of motor neuron disease in 1982.

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References

  1. "Eddie Kushner Statistics on JustSportsStats.com". justsportsstats.com. Retrieved 2015-04-22.
  2. Winnipeg Free Press, Friday, November 11, 1938, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  3. Winnipeg Free Press, Tuesday, July 14, 1936, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  4. Winnipeg Free Press, Thursday, March 18, 1943, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada