Edgar Laprade

Last updated
Edgar Laprade
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1993
1954 Topps Edgar Laprade.JPG
Born(1919-10-10)October 10, 1919
Mine Centre, Ontario, Canada
Died April 28, 2014(2014-04-28) (aged 94)
Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
Height 5 ft 8 in (173 cm)
Weight 160 lb (73 kg; 11 st 6 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Right
Played for New York Rangers (NHL)
Port Arthur Bearcats (TBSHL)
Playing career 19451955

Edgar Louis "Beaver" Laprade (October 10, 1919 – April 28, 2014) was a Canadian professional ice hockey centre who played for the New York Rangers in the National Hockey League. The son of Thomas and Edith Laprade, [1] he was born in the New Ontario community of Mine Centre. [2] By age 4, he and his family moved to Port Arthur, Ontario. [2] He also spent time with the Port Arthur Bearcats of the Thunder Bay Senior Hockey League.

Contents

Playing career

Laprade pictured on the 1939 Port Arthur Bearcats composite photo Laprade Edgar.png
Laprade pictured on the 1939 Port Arthur Bearcats composite photo

Laprade started his hockey career with the local Port Arthur Bruins in the Thunder Bay Junior A Hockey League. He was a prolific scorer with the team and he was frequently their best player. In 1938–39, Laprade joined the Port Arthur Bearcats in the Thunder Bay Senior Hockey League (TBSHL). Again, Laprade scored many times, and he was selected as the MVP of the TBSHL in 1938-39 and 1940–41. He also helped the team win the Allan Cup in 1939–40.

After the 1942–43 season, Laprade joined the army. While in the army, he still played hockey regularly with the Winnipeg Army. In 1944–45, he played one season with the Barriefield Bears before moving on to the National Hockey League with the New York Rangers. In his first season of NHL hockey, Laprade recorded 34 points in 49 games. His effort impressed the league and he was awarded the Calder Memorial Trophy. Laprade finished the 1946-47 NHL season with 40 points, and earned a spot in the first NHL All-Star Game. He also played in the 1948, 1949, and 1950 NHL All-Star Games.

During his career, Laprade played three full seasons without recording a penalty, and was awarded the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy in 1949-50. In the same season, the Rangers made it all the way to the Stanley Cup Finals against the Detroit Red Wings, the closest Laprade ever came to winning a Stanley Cup. The series went all the way to a Game 7 before Pete Babando of the Detroit Red Wings scored the game-winning goal in overtime. After that, Laprade played five more seasons with the Rangers before retiring. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1993.

Life after hockey

In 1939, he married Arline Whear, his coach's niece. The couple had three daughters. [1]

After retiring from hockey, Laprade went into a partnership with Guy Perciante in operating a sporting goods store, Perciante & Laprade Sporting Goods Limited, in Thunder Bay, Ontario for 30 years. [3] Perciante and Laprade also owned and managed an arena in Port Arthur. [1]

He served as a member of Port Arthur and then Thunder Bay city council from 1959 to 1970 and again from 1972 to 1973. [4] He also served on the board of governors for Confederation College and Lakehead University. [1]

Laprade died at home in Thunder Bay at the age of 94 on April 28, 2014. [5]

Awards and achievements

Career statistics

   Regular season   Playoffs
Season TeamLeagueGP G A Pts PIM GPGAPtsPIM
1935–36Port Arthur Bruins TBJHL 14131023644262
1936–37Port Arthur BruinsTBJHL18191433236395
1937–38Port Arthur BruinsTBJHL18231134956060
1938–39Port Arthur BruinsTBJHL107411
1938–39 Port Arthur Bearcats TBSHL2531940763364
1938–39 Port Arthur Bearcats Al-Cup 13224266
1939–40Port Arthur BearcatsTBSHL22201535835162
1939–40 Port Arthur BearcatsAl-Cup121310236
1940–41Port Arthur BearcatsTBSHL20262147742130
1941–42Port Arthur BearcatsTBSHL151823414
1941–42 Port Arthur BearcatsAl-Cup171221336
1942–43Port Arthur BearcatsTBSHL8710170374114
1942–43 Port Arthur BearcatsAl-Cup8610162
1943–44Winnipeg ArmyWNDHL6103130
1944–45Barriefield BearsKCHL1928472458130
1945–46 New York Rangers NHL 491519340
1946–47 New York RangersNHL581525409
1947–48 New York RangersNHL59133447761450
1948–49 New York RangersNHL5618123012
1949–50 New York RangersNHL602222442123584
1950–51 New York RangersNHL421013230
1951–52 New York RangersNHL70929388
1952–53 New York RangersNHL112132
1953–54 New York RangersNHL351672
1954–55 New York RangersNHL60311140
TBSHL totals901027818026161792610
Al-Cup totals5053459820
NHL totals500108172280421849134

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Mr Edgar Louis Laprade Obituary". Sargent and Son Ltd. Archived from the original on 2014-05-14. Retrieved 2014-05-13.
  2. 1 2 Shea, Kevin. "One on One Edgar Laprade". Legends of Hockey - Spotlight. Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 24 October 2013.
  3. "All-Time Greats: Edgar Laprade". The Want List.
  4. "Hall-of-famer Edgar Laprade dies at 94". TBnewswatch. April 28, 2014. Retrieved 2014-05-13.
  5. Goldstein, Richard (April 28, 2014). "Edgar Laprade, Center and Gentleman on the Ice, Dies at 94". New York Times. Retrieved April 29, 2014.
  6. Cohen, Russ; Halligan, John; Raider, Adam (2009). 100 Ranger Greats: Superstars, Unsung Heroes and Colorful Characters. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN   978-0470736197 . Retrieved 2020-02-04.
Preceded by
Frank McCool
Winner of the Calder Memorial Trophy
1946
Succeeded by
Howie Meeker
Preceded by
Bill Quackenbush
Winner of the Lady Byng Trophy
1950
Succeeded by
Red Kelly