Edward Brown (Manitoba politician)

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Edward Brown (May 23, 1865 February 8, 1947) [1] was a Manitoba politician. He served briefly as leader of the Manitoba Liberal Party (1906–07), and was later a cabinet minister in Tobias Norris's government (1915–1922).

Manitoba Province of Canada

Manitoba is a province at the longitudinal centre of Canada. It is often considered one of the three prairie provinces and is Canada's fifth-most populous province with its estimated 1.3 million people. Manitoba covers 649,950 square kilometres (250,900 sq mi) with a widely varied landscape, stretching from the northern oceanic coastline to the southern border with the United States. The province is bordered by the provinces of Ontario to the east and Saskatchewan to the west, the territories of Nunavut to the north, and Northwest Territories to the northwest, and the U.S. states of North Dakota and Minnesota to the south.

Manitoba Liberal Party centrist political party in Manitoba, Canada

The Manitoba Liberal Party is a political party in Manitoba, Canada. Its roots can be traced to the late nineteenth-century, following the province's creation in 1870.

Tobias Norris politician

Tobias Crawford Norris was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served as the tenth Premier of Manitoba from 1915 to 1922. Norris was a member of the Liberal Party.

Born in Gresham, Bruce County, Ontario, the son of Edward J. Brown, was educated in St. Catharines. In 1882, he began business as a merchant in Paisley. In 1888, Brown came to Portage la Prairie; he served as mayor there for six years. He married Esther Huston in 1893. In 1909, Brown moved to Winnipeg where he established a financial brokerage firm that he operated until 1942. He was also president of the Canada West Securities Corporation and of the British Northwestern Fire Insurance Company. In 1910, he was listed as one of Winnipeg's 19 millionaires. [1]

Paisley, Ontario Community in Ontario, Canada

Paisley is an unincorporated community and village in the municipality of Arran–Elderslie, Bruce County in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. Paisley is defined by its position at the confluence of the Saugeen River and the Teeswater River, and at the junction of Bruce Roads 1, 11, and 3.

Portage la Prairie City in Manitoba, Canada

Portage la Prairie is a small city in the Central Plains Region of Manitoba, Canada. As of 2016, the population was 13,304 and the land area of the city was 24.68 square kilometres (9.53 sq mi). Portage la Prairie is approximately 75 kilometres (47 mi) west of Winnipeg, along the Trans-Canada Highway, and sits on the Assiniboine River, which flooded the town persistently until a diversion channel north to Lake Manitoba was built to divert the flood waters. The city is surrounded by the Rural Municipality of Portage la Prairie.

Winnipeg Provincial capital city in Manitoba, Canada

Winnipeg is the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba in Canada. Centred on the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers, it is near the longitudinal centre of North America, approximately 110 kilometres (70 mi) north of the Canada–United States border.

Brown made his electoral debut in the provincial campaign of 1903, narrowly losing to Conservative Hugh Armstrong in Portage la Prairie. He subsequently became a leading organizer for the Liberals, and was acclaimed as party leader on March 28, 1906 (replacing Charles Mickle). He was again defeated by Armstrong in the election of 1907, however, and resigned as party leader shortly thereafter. Brown lost a third electoral contest in 1910, falling to Lendrum McMeans in Winnipeg South, 2545 votes to 2496.

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Charles Julius Mickle was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He was a provincial cabinet minister for three years and on two occasions served as the leader of the Liberal Party in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba.

Lendrum McMeans was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1910 to 1914, and was later appointed to the Senate of Canada. McMeans was a member of the Conservative Party.

Brown finally entered parliament in 1915, running in a deferred election in the northern riding of The Pas. [2] The Liberal party led by Premier Tobias Norris had already won a landslide victory in the rest of the province, [3] and Brown had joined the cabinet as Provincial Treasurer; [1] perhaps not surprisingly, he was unopposed for his riding. Brown held his cabinet position until the Norris government was defeated in 1922. [2] In the election of 1920, he fended off a weak challenge from Labour candidate A. Norgrove.

The Minister of Finance is a cabinet minister in the government of Manitoba. Prior to 1969, the minister was styled as the Provincial Treasurer. Many regard the Finance Minister as the second-most important member of government, after the Premier.

In 1922, Brown supported efforts to reunite the "Unionist" and "Laurier Liberal" factions of the Liberal Party in Canada and Manitoba (see Wilfrid Laurier). While these efforts were successful, they led to a popular perception that the previously-independent Norris government would henceforth be subservient to the federal Liberals. Opposition parties used this to their advantage in the election of 1922, which the United Farmers of Manitoba won in a landslide.

Wilfrid Laurier 7th prime minister of Canada

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The Progressive Party of Manitoba, Canada, was a political party that developed from the United Farmers of Manitoba (UFM), an agrarian movement that became politically active following World War I. A successor to the Manitoba Grain Growers' Association, the UFM represented the interests of farmers frustrated with traditional political parties.

Brown was not a candidate in 1922, and did not return to political life thereafter. [2]

He died in Winnipeg at the age of 81. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Edward Brown (1865-1947)". Memorable Manitobans. Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-18.
  2. 1 2 3 "MLA Biographies - Deceased". Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. Archived from the original on 2014-04-07.
  3. "Historical Summaries" (PDF). Elections Manitoba. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-03-06. Retrieved 2012-09-23.