Edward Bunbury

Last updated

Sir Edward Herbert Bunbury, 9th Baronet (8 July 1811 – 5 March 1895), known as Edward Bunbury until 1886, was an English Barrister and a British Liberal Party politician.

Contents

Biography

Bunbury was the second son of Sir Henry Bunbury, 7th Baronet, and the grandson of Henry Bunbury. His mother was Louisa Emilia, daughter of General the Hon. Henry Edward Fox, younger son of Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland, and his wife Lady Caroline Lennox, the eldest of the famous Lennox sisters. Through the latter he was a descendant of Charles II. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge. [1] He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple in 1841.

In 1847 Bunbury was elected to the House of Commons for Bury St Edmunds, a seat he held until 1852. In 1886, he succeeded his elder brother in the baronetcy.

Bunbury died of pneumonia in March 1895, aged 83. [2] [3] He never married and was succeeded in the baronetcy by his nephew, Charles. [3]

Work

Bunbury's two-volume history of ancient geography [4] published in 1879 is the first modern work in English which treats the textual sources with any sophistication.

He was also a contributing author to the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854–57), [5] and to a number of other reference works. Samuel Sharpe thought Bunbury had plagiarised his work on the Ptolemies. [6] [7]

Notes

  1. "Bunbury, Edward Herbert (BNBY829EH)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. Freeman, Nicholas (2011). 1895: Drama, Disaster and Disgrace in Late Victorian Britain. Edinburgh University Press. p. 96. ISBN   9780748640560.
  3. 1 2 "Sir Edward Bunbury". The Times (34519). London. 10 March 1895. p. 10.
  4. Bunbury, Edward Herbert (1879). A history of ancient geography among the Greeks and Romans, from the earliest ages till the fall of the Roman Empire. London: John Murray. Volume 1 Volume 2
  5. Smith 1854, p. iv.
  6. SS Diary entry 3 September 1850. "I certainly felt mortified on reading the articles on the Ptolemies in Dr. Smith's " Dictionary of Classical Biography." They were all written by E. H. Bunbury with the help of my " History of Egypt," and with-out any acknowledgment, though he even borrowed the volume from my brother Dan for the purpose."
  7. Clayden, PW. Samuel Sharpe. p. 82. Retrieved 10 May 2016.

Related Research Articles

Earl of Lichfield

Earl of Lichfield is a title that has been created three times, twice in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom (1831). The third creation is extant and is held by a member of the Anson family.

Viscount Gage

Viscount Gage, of Castle Island in the County of Kerry of the Kingdom of Ireland, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1720 for Thomas Gage, along with the subsidiary title of Baron Gage, of Castlebar in the County of Mayo, also in the Peerage of Ireland. In 1744 he also succeeded his cousin as eighth Baronet, of Firle Place. The titles remain united. The Gage family descends from John Gage, who was created a baronet, of Firle Place in the County of Sussex, in the Baronetage of England on 26 March 1622. His great-grandson, the seventh Baronet, represented Seaford in Parliament. He was succeeded by his first cousin, Thomas Gage, 1st Viscount Gage, the eighth Baronet. He sat as a Member of Parliament for Minehead and Tewkesbury and also served as Governor of Barbados. In 1720, 24 years before succeeding in the baronetcy, he was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Gage and Viscount Gage. His second son was the military commander the Hon. Thomas Gage.

Sir Henry Edward Bunbury, KCB, 7th Baronet was a British soldier and historian.

<i>Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology</i> Encyclopedia and biographical dictionary ed. by William Smith (1849)

The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. Edited by William Smith, the dictionary spans three volumes and 3,700 pages. It is a classic work of 19th-century lexicography. The work is a companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography.

Croft baronets

There have been three baronetcies created for persons with the surname Croft, one in the Baronetage of England and two in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. All three creations are extant as of 2008.

Knightley baronets

There have been two baronetcies created for members of the Knightley family, one in the Baronetage of England and one in the Baronetage of Great Britain. Both creations are extinct. The Knightley family originated at the Staffordshire manor of Knightley, acquired by them shortly after the Norman Conquest of 1066. In 1415 Sir Richard Knightley purchased the manor of Fawsley in Northamptonshire, where the senior line of the family became seated.

There have been five baronetcies created for people with the surname Napier, three in the Baronetage of England, one in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia and one in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. As of 2014 two of the creations are extant.

Bunbury baronets

The Bunbury Baronetcy, of Bunbury, Oxon and Stanney Hall in the County of Chester, is a title in the Baronetage of England. It was created on 29 June 1681 for Thomas Bunbury, Sheriff of Cheshire from 1673 to 1674 and the member of an ancient Cheshire family. His grandson, Henry, the third Baronet, and great-grandson, the fourth Baronet, both sat as Members of Parliament for Chester. The latter died unmarried at an early age and was succeeded by his younger brother, the fifth Baronet. He was a clergyman. On his death in 1764 the title passed to his eldest son, the sixth Baronet. He represented Suffolk in the House of Commons for over forty years but is best remembered for his marriage to Lady Sarah Lennox. He died childless in 1821 and was succeeded by his nephew, the seventh Baronet. He was the son of Henry Bunbury, younger son of the fifth Baronet. The seventh Baronet was a distinguished soldier and politician. His eldest son, the eighth Baronet, was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1868. He died childless in 1886 and was succeeded by his younger brother, the ninth Baronet. He was Liberal Member of Parliament for Bury St Edmunds. He died unmarried in 1895 and was succeeded by his nephew, the tenth Baronet. He was the son of Colonel Henry William St Pierre Bunbury, third son of the seventh Baronet. He served as High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1908 and was a Deputy Lieutenant of the county. On his death in 1930 the title passed to his son, the eleventh Baronet. He was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1936 and was a Deputy Lieutenant of the county. His son, the twelfth Baronet, was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1972. As of 2014 the title is held by the latter's second but eldest surviving son, the thirteenth Baronet, who succeeded in 1985.

Wrey baronets title in the Baronetage of England

The Wrey Baronetcy, of Trebitch in the County of Cornwall, is a title in the Baronetage of England. It was created on 30 June 1628 for William Wrey (d.1636), 2nd son of John Wrey of Trebeigh, St Ive, Cornwall, a member of an ancient Devon family. The third Baronet was a supporter of the Royalist cause and sat as Member of Parliament for Lostwithiel after the Restoration. He married Lady Anne, third daughter and co-heir of Edward Bourchier, 4th Earl of Bath, and a co-heir to the barony of Fitzwarine. The fourth Baronet represented Liskeard and Devon in the House of Commons. The fifth Baronet was Member of Parliament for Camelford while the sixth Baronet represented Barnstaple.

The Imbert-Terry Baronetcy, of Strete Ralegh in Whimple in the County of Devon, is a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 2 July 1917 for Henry Imbert-Terry. He was Chairman of the Central Organization Committee of the Conservative and Unionist Party from 1907 to 1917.

There have been three baronetcies created for persons with the surname Sharp, one in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia and two in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom.

Mostyn baronets

The Mostyn baronets are two lines of Welsh baronets holding baronetcies created in 1660 and 1670, both in the Baronetage of England. One creation is extant as of 2015. The two lines are related and both claim descent from Edwin of Tegeingl, an 11th-century lord of Tegeingl, a territory which approximates modern Flintshire.

There have been two baronetcies created for persons with the surname Pakington, one in the Baronetage of England and one in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. One creation is extant as of 2008.

Sir Charles Bunbury, 6th Baronet British politician

Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury, 6th Baronet was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1761 and 1812. He was the first husband of Lady Sarah Lennox.

Sir Harry Verney, 2nd Baronet

Sir Harry Verney, 2nd Baronet PC, DL, JP was an English soldier and Liberal politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1832 and 1885.

Sir Thomas Hanmer, 2nd Baronet

Sir Thomas Hanmer, 2nd Baronet (1612–1678) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1640 and from 1669 to 1678. He was a Royalist during the English Civil War and raised troops for Charles I. In his personal life he was a keen horticulturist. He is not to be confused with Sir Thomas Hanmer, 2nd Baronet (1747–1828) of the second creation.

The High Sheriff of Carlow was the British Crown's judicial representative in County Carlow, Ireland from the 14th century until 1922, when the office was abolished in the new Free State and replaced by the office of Carlow County Sheriff. The sheriff had judicial, electoral, ceremonial and administrative functions and executed High Court Writs. In 1908, an Order in Council made the Lord-Lieutenant the Sovereign's prime representative in a county and reduced the High Sheriff's precedence. However the sheriff retained his responsibilities for the preservation of law and order in the county. The usual procedure for appointing the sheriff from 1660 onwards was that three persons were nominated at the beginning of each year from the county and the Lord Lieutenant then appointed his choice as High Sheriff for the remainder of the year. Often the other nominees were appointed as under-sheriffs. Sometimes a sheriff did not fulfil his entire term through death or other event and another sheriff was then appointed for the remainder of the year. The dates given hereunder are the dates of appointment. All addresses are in County Carlow unless stated otherwise.

Baron Dunleath, of Ballywalter in the County of Down, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 29 August 1892 for the businessman and former Conservative Member of Parliament for Downpatrick, John Mulholland. The Mulholland family were involved in the cotton and linen industry in Ulster in the north of Ireland. The first Baron's son, the second Baron, represented Londonderry North in the House of Commons as a Conservative. His grandson, the fourth Baron, was a member of the Northern Ireland Assembly for the Alliance Party. He was succeeded by his first cousin, the fifth Baron, who had already succeeded his father as second Baronet of Ballyscullion. As of 2017 the titles are held by the fifth Baron's son, the sixth Baron, who succeeded in 1997.

Magnus Sinus

The Magnus Sinus or Sinus Magnus, also anglicized as the Great Gulf, was the form of the Gulf of Thailand and South China Sea known to Greek, Roman, Arab, Persian, and Renaissance cartographers before the Age of Discovery. It was then briefly conflated with the Pacific Ocean before disappearing from maps.

Sir Henry Charles John Bunbury, 10th Baronet was a former Royal Navy officer and a country gentleman.

References

Further reading

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
The Earl Jermyn
Lord Charles FitzRoy
Member of Parliament for Bury St Edmunds
18471852
With: The Earl Jermyn
Succeeded by
The Earl Jermyn
John Stuart
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
Charles James Fox Bunbury
Baronet
(of Stanney Hall)
1886–1895
Succeeded by
Henry Charles Bunbury