Edward Carrere

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Edward Carrere
Born(1906-10-13)13 October 1906
Died19 December 1984(1984-12-19) (aged 78)
Other namesEd Carrere
Occupation Art director
Years active1947 - 1970

Born in Mexico, Edward Carrere (13 October 1906 - 19 December 1984) first hit Hollywood in 1947, making his debut as an art director on "My Wild Irish Rose". He garnered his first Academy Award nomination two years later for the Errol Flynn epic "Adventures of Don Juan".

Throughout the late 1940s and the 1950s he worked on such films as "White Heat" (1949), "The Fountainhead" (1949), "The Flame and the Arrow" (1950), "Dial M for Murder" (1954), "Sweet Smell of Success" (1957), "Separate Tables" (1958) and "Elmer Gantry" (1960).

His second Oscar nomination was in 1960 was for the Roosevelt biopic "Sunrise at Campobello". He won the Academy Award seven years later for his work on "Camelot". [1]

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References

  1. "The 40th Academy Awards (1968) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 3 November 2014. Retrieved 10 November 2011.