Edward Harley, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer

Last updated

Edward Harley, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer (c. 1699 11 April 1755, in Bath) was a British peer and Member of Parliament.

Bath, Somerset City in Somerset, England

Bath is the largest city in the county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths. In 2011, the population was 88,859. Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London and 11 miles (18 km) south-east of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage site in 1987.

Brampton Bryan Hall Brampton Bryan Hall (3450662830).jpg
Brampton Bryan Hall

Harley was the son of Edward Harley and his wife Sarah Foley and was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford. He succeeded his father in 1735 to the Eywood estate at Titley, Herefordshire and his cousin Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer in 1741 to the earldom and the family seat at Brampton Bryan. [1]

Edward Harley, of Eywood, Titley, Herefordshire was a British Member of Parliament and Auditor of the Imprests.

Westminster School School in Westminster, United Kingdom

Westminster School is a public school in London, England, located within the precincts of Westminster Abbey. Westminster's origins can be traced to a charity school established by the Benedictine monks of Westminster Abbey. Its continuous existence is certain from the early fourteenth century. Boys are admitted to the Under School at age seven and to the senior school at age thirteen; girls are admitted at age sixteen into the Sixth Form. The school has around 750 pupils; around a quarter are boarders, most of whom go home at weekends, after Saturday morning school. The school motto, Dat Deus Incrementum, is taken from the New Testament, specifically 1 Corinthians 3:6.

Christ Church, Oxford Constituent college of the University of Oxford in England

Christ Church is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. Christ Church is a joint foundation of the college and the cathedral of the Oxford diocese, which serves as the college chapel and whose dean is ex officio the college head.

One of his first acts on succeeding his brother was to auction off his predecessor's art and coin collection through the auctioneer Cock, at an art sale held under the Piazza, Covent Garden, on 8 March 1741/2 and the five following days, with six more days being required by the coins. Nearly all the leading men of the day, including Horace Walpole, attended or were represented at this sale, and the prices varied from five shillings for an anonymous bishop's "head" to 165 guineas for van Dyck's group of "Sir Kenelm Digby, lady, and son".

Covent Garden district in London, England

Covent Garden is a district in London, on the eastern fringes of the West End, between St Martin's Lane and Drury Lane. It is associated with the former fruit-and-vegetable market in the central square, now a popular shopping and tourist site, and with the Royal Opera House, which itself may be referred to as "Covent Garden". The district is divided by the main thoroughfare of Long Acre, north of which is given over to independent shops centred on Neal's Yard and Seven Dials, while the south contains the central square with its street performers and most of the historical buildings, theatres and entertainment facilities, including the London Transport Museum and the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.

Horace Walpole 18th-century English art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician

Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, also known as Horace Walpole, was an English writer, art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician.

Shilling Unit of currency formerly used in the United Kingdom, Australia, and other British Commonwealth countries, as well as much of the British Empire

The shilling is a unit of currency formerly used in Austria (schilling); and in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, United States and other British Commonwealth countries. Currently the shilling is used as a currency in four east African countries: Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Somalia. It is also the proposed currency that the east African community plans to introduce . The word shilling comes from old English "Scilling", a monetary term meaning twentieth of a pound, and from the Proto-Germanic root skiljaną meaning 'to separate, split, divide.' The word "Scilling" is mentioned in the earliest recorded Germanic law codes, those of Æthelberht of Kent.

He was returned to Parliament as the member for Herefordshire in 1727, sitting until 1741. [1]

The county constituency of Herefordshire, in the West Midlands of England bordering on Wales, was abolished when the county was divided for parliamentary purposes in 1885. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885.

Family

On 16 March 1724 or 1725, at St. Anne's Church, Soho, he married Martha Morgan (daughter of John Morgan and Martha Vaughan). They had several children:

St Annes Church, Soho Church in London

Saint Anne's Church in the Soho section of London was consecrated on 21 March 1686 by Bishop Henry Compton as the parish church of the new civil and ecclesiastical parish of St Anne, created from part of the parish of St Martin in the Fields. The Church of England parish has been the Parish of St Anne with St Thomas and St Peter since 1945. The church and parish are part of the Deanery of Westminster within the Diocese of London in the Church of England. Parts of its churchyard around the tower and west end are now the public park of St Anne's Gardens, accessed from the Shaftesbury Avenue end of Wardour Street, whilst the church itself is accessed via a gate at the Shaftesbury Avenue end of Dean Street, as it does not front onto the street.

Soho District in London, United Kingdom

Soho is an area of the City of Westminster, part of the West End of London. Originally a fashionable district for the aristocracy, it has been one of the main entertainment districts in the capital since the 19th century.

Edward Harley, 4th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer British noble and politician

Edward Harley, 4th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, styled Lord Harley from 1741 to 1755, was a British peer and Tory politician.

Edward Harley, 5th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer British noble

Edward Harley, 5th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer was an English nobleman.

Thomas Harley British politician

The Honourable Thomas Harley was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons for 41 years from 1761 to 1802.

Related Research Articles

Robert Harley (1579–1656) English statesman (died 1656)

Sir Robert Harley was an English statesman who served as Master of the Mint for Charles I and later supported the parliamentarians during the English Civil War.

Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer English politician

Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, KG PC FRS was an English and later British statesman of the late Stuart and early Georgian periods. He began his career as a Whig, before defecting to a new Tory Ministry. He was raised to the peerage of Great Britain as an earl in 1711. Between 1711 and 1714 he served as Lord High Treasurer, effectively Queen Anne's chief minister. He has been called a Prime Minister, although it is generally accepted that the de facto first minister to be a prime minister was Robert Walpole in 1721.

William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland English peer

William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, styled Viscount Woodstock from 1709 to 1716 and Marquess of Titchfield from 1716 to 1726, was a British peer and politician.

John Ker, 1st Duke of Roxburghe Scottish duke

John Ker, 1st Duke of Roxburghe, KG, PC, FRS was a Scottish nobleman.

Harley is a surname, and may refer to

Baron Mortimer

Several members of the Mortimer family were summoned to Parliament during the reign of Edward I, thereby making them hereditary barons in the Peerage of England. The most important family with this surname were the lords of Wigmore, a marcher lordship on the borders of Herefordshire and Shropshire with Wales, living at Wigmore Castle. The second Baron Mortimer of Wigmore was created Earl of March.

Thomas Hay, 9th Earl of Kinnoull Scottish earl and British politician

Thomas Hay, 9th Earl of KinnoullPC, styled Viscount Dupplin from 1719 to 1758, was a Scottish peer, British politician, and scholar.

George Hay, 8th Earl of Kinnoull British diplomat

George Henry Hay, 8th Earl of KinnoullFRS, styled as Viscount Dupplin from 1709 to 1719, was a British peer and diplomat.

Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer British politician, bibliophile, collector and patron of the arts

Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, styled Lord Harley between 1711 and 1724, was a British politician, bibliophile, collector and patron of the arts.

Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer

Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1711 for the statesman Robert Harley, with remainder, failing heirs male of his body, to those of his grandfather, Sir Robert Harley. He was made Baron Harley, of Wigmore in the County of Hereford, at the same time, also in the Peerage of Great Britain and with similar remainder as for the earldom. Harley was the eldest son of Sir Edward Harley and the grandson of the aforementioned Sir Robert Harley.

Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer English noblewoman

Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer was an English noblewoman, the only child and heiress of John Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle and his wife, the former Lady Margaret Cavendish, daughter of Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

Robert Harley was a British Member of Parliament.

John Harley was a British bishop.

Alfred Harley, 6th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer British earl

Alfred Harley, 6th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, styled Lord Harley between 1828 and 1849, was a British peer and the last holder of the title of Earl of Oxford and Mortimer.

Sir John Morgan, 4th Baronet British Member of Parliament (1710-1767)

Sir John Morgan, 4th Baronet, of Kinnersley Castle, Herefordshire, was a British Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1734 and 1767.

References

  1. 1 2 "HARLEY, Edward (?1699-1755), of Eywood, Herefs". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Velters Cornewall
Sir Edward Goodere
Member of Parliament for Herefordshire
17271741
With: Velters Cornewall
Succeeded by
Velters Cornewall
Thomas Foley
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Edward Harley
Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer
17411755
Succeeded by
Edward Harley