Edward I, Count of Bar

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Edward I, Count of Bar
Died November 1336
Famagusta
Noble family Montbéliard
Spouse(s) Mary of Burgundy
Father Henry III, Count of Bar
Mother Eleanor of England

Edward I (died November 1336), was the Count of Bar from 1302 to his death. He was a minor when he succeeded his father, Henry III, as count and ruled under the regency of his grandfather, as his mother Eleanor was dead since 1298.

Henry III, Count of Bar 13th-century French nobleman

Henry III of Bar was Count of Bar from 1291 to 1302. He was the son of Theobald II, Count of Bar and Jeanne de Toucy.

A regent is a person appointed to govern a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated. The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent".

Eleanor of England, Countess of Bar 13th-century English princess and countess of Bar

Eleanor of England was an English princess, the eldest surviving daughter of King Edward I of England and his first wife, Queen Eleanor of Castile.

The county was governed on Edward's behalf by John of Puisaye, Theobald, Bishop of Liège, and Renaud, Bishop of Metz.

In 1308, he accompanied Frederick IV of Lorraine into battle. In 1310, he married Mary, daughter of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy, [1] and was declared to have attained his majority. Then he purchased the lordship of Stenay from his uncle John, the aforementioned lord of Puisaye. In 1313, he was captured in war against Frederick and not ransomed until 1314. He constructed a hydraulic forge at Moyeuvre-Grande in 1323. In 1324, he was again allied in military operations with the duke of Lorraine, and also with the King of Bohemia, John, and the Archbishop of Trier, Baldwin of Luxembourg. This operations was the War of Metz, for each of the allied lords was owed something by the citizens of Metz. Edward demanded compensation for garrisoning the city with his own troops during a conflict with the bishop of Verdun.

Robert II, Duke of Burgundy Duke of Burgundy

Robert II of Burgundy was Duke of Burgundy between 1272 and 1306. Robert was the third son of duke Hugh IV and Yolande of Dreux.

Stenay Commune in Grand Est, France

Stenay is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Moyeuvre-Grande Commune in Grand Est, France

Moyeuvre-Grande is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

In 1336, Edward died in a shipwreck off the coast of Famagusta, Cyprus, while en route to a Crusade. By his wife, he left three children:

Famagusta Place in Famagusta District, Cyprus

Famagusta is a city on the east coast of Cyprus. It is located east of Nicosia and possesses the deepest harbour of the island. During the medieval period, Famagusta was the island's most important port city and a gateway to trade with the ports of the Levant, from where the Silk Road merchants carried their goods to Western Europe. The old walled city and parts of the modern city presently fall within the de facto Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus in Gazimağusa District, of which it is the capital.

Cyprus Island country in Mediterranean

Cyprus, officially the Republic of Cyprus, is an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean and the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean, located south of Turkey, west of Syria and Lebanon, northwest of Israel, north of Egypt, and southeast of Greece.

Rudolph, Duke of Lorraine Duke of Lorraine

Rudolph, called the Valiant, was the Duke of Lorraine from 1329 to his death. He was the son and successor of Frederick IV and Elisabeth, daughter of Albert I of Germany. Though he was but nine years of age when his father died and he succeeded to the duchy under the regency of his mother, he was a warrior prince, taking part in four separate wars in Lorraine, France, Brittany, and Iberia. He was killed at the Battle of Crécy.

Guido Gonzaga Italian condottiero

Guido Gonzaga was an Italian condottiero, son of Ludovico I Gonzaga capitano del popolo of Mantua and imperial vicar.

Mantua Comune in Lombardy, Italy

Mantua is a city and comune in Lombardy, Italy, and capital of the province of the same name.

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Erard of Bar, was a monk by 1292 and then seigneur de Pierrepont et d'Ancerville by 1302. Erard was one of eight sons born to Theobald II, Count of Bar and his wife, Jeanne de Toucy.

References

  1. 1 2 Michelle Bubenicek, Quand les femmes gouvernent: droit et politique au XIVe siècle:Yolande de Flandre, Droit et politique au XIV siecle, (Ecole des Chartes, 2002), 54-55.