Edward L. Greene

Last updated

For the botanist see Edward Lee Greene

Edward L. Greene
Edward Greene.jpg
Greene pictured in The Agromeck 1912, North Carolina State yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1884-03-29)March 29, 1884
New Haven, Connecticut
DiedSeptember 27, 1952(1952-09-27) (aged 68)
Mamaroneck, New York
Playing career
Football
1904–1907 Penn
Position(s) Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1908 North Carolina
1909–1913 North Carolina A&M
Baseball
1912 North Carolina A&M
Head coaching record
Overall28–11–5 (football)
13–6–1 (baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
2 SAIAA (1910, 1913)
Awards
All-American, 1906

Edward Lawrence Greene (March 29, 1884 – September 27, 1952) was an American football player and coach of football and baseball.

Contents

Biography

Greenewas born on March 29, 1884 in New Haven, Connecticut. [1]

He served as the head football coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1908 and at North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, now North Carolina State University, from 1909 to 1913, compiling a career college football record of 28–11–5. Greene was also the head baseball coach at North Carolina A&M for one season in 1912, tallying a mark of 13–6–1. He played college football at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was named an All-American in 1906. [2] He later served as the general manager of the National Better Business Bureau until his death.

He died of a heart attack on September 27, 1952 in Mamaroneck, New York. [3]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
North Carolina Tar Heels (South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1908)
1908 North Carolina 3–3–31–2–24th
North Carolina:3–3–31–2–2
North Carolina A&M Aggies (South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1909–1913)
1909 North Carolina A&M 6–11–1T–4th
1910 North Carolina A&M 4–0–22–0–11st
1911 North Carolina A&M 5–31–1T–2nd
1912 North Carolina A&M 4–30–27th
1913 North Carolina A&M 6–12–01st
North Carolina A&M:25–8–26–4–1
Total:28–11–5
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

Baseball

Statistics overview
SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
North Carolina A&M Farmers (Independent)(1912)
1912North Carolina A&M13–6–1
Total:13–6–1

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References

  1. Printers' Ink. 241. Decker Communications, Incorporated. 1952. ISSN   0196-1160 . Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  2. The Agromeck 1918. North Carolina State College. 1912. p. 145. Retrieved November 14, 2011.
  3. "EDWARD L. GREENE - President of National Better Business Bureau Dies". select.nytimes.com. Retrieved April 14, 2015.