Edward Lloyd, 1st Baron Mostyn

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Edward Pryce Lloyd by Charles Turner Portrait of The Right Honble. Edward Pryce, Baron Mostyn, of Pengwern, Flintshire (4674515).jpg
Edward Pryce Lloyd by Charles Turner

Edward Pryce Lloyd, 1st Baron Mostyn (17 September 1768 – 3 April 1854), known as Sir Edward Lloyd, 2nd Baronet from 1795 to 1831, was a British politician.

Contents

Life

He was born the son of Bell Lloyd of Pontryffyd and Bodfach and succeeded his uncle Sir Edward Pryce Lloyd, 1st Baronet, as second Baronet of Pengwerra in 1795, according to a special remainder in the letters patent. On 11 February 1794 he married Elizabeth, third daughter of Sir Roger Mostyn, 5th Baronet.

He was High Sheriff of Flintshire for 1796, High Sheriff of Caernarvonshire for 1797 and High Sheriff of Merionethshire for 1804. [1] In 1806 he was elected to the House of Commons for Flint Boroughs, a seat he held until 1807 and again from 1812 to 1831 and also represented Beaumaris between 1807 and 1812. In 1831, after his wife had inherited the main estates of the unmarried Sir Thomas Mostyn, 6th Baronet, he was raised to the peerage as Baron Mostyn, of Mostyn in County Flint. [2]

He lived at Pengwern, between Rhuddlan and St Asaph in Flintshire, in a house that had been built by his great uncle, Sir Edward Lloyd. A guide book to the area published in 1847 described him as "a genuine Welshman [who] speaks with fluency the language of his country", adding that "his lordship keeps two packs of hounds for the amusement of his friends and the neighbouring gentry; and though in the 78th year of his age, seldom misses mounting his scarlet, particularly if the hounds turn out within eight or ten miles of his mansion." [3]

In 1840 a group of friends and admirers presented him with a portrait of himself, painted by Mary Martha Pearson. [3]

Lord Mostyn died in April 1854, aged 85, and was succeeded in his titles by his son Edward.

Issue

1. Hon Edward Mostyn Lloyd Mostyn MP born 13 January 1795. Married 20 June 1827 to Lady Harriet Margaret Scott (eldest daughter of the Earl of Clonmel, with issue)

2. Hon. Elizabeth b. 19 August 1796

3. Thomas Price d. 4 August 1800

4. Hon. Essex b. 18 April 1807

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References

  1. Complete Baronetage
  2. William Llewelyn Davies. "MOSTYN family of Mostyn Hall, Flints., etc". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. Retrieved 21 February 2019.
  3. 1 2 Parry, Edward (1847). The Cambrian Mirror, or a New Tourist Companion through North Wales (2nd ed.). London. p. 104.
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Flint Burghs
18061807
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Beaumaris
18071812
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Flint Burghs
18121831
Succeeded by
Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Baron Mostyn
18311854
Succeeded by
Baronetage of Great Britain
Preceded by Baronet
(of Pengwerra)
17951854
Succeeded by