Edward Newman (New Zealand politician)

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Edward Newman Edward Newman CMG.jpg
Edward Newman

Edward Newman CMG (4 July 1858 – 24 April 1946) was a Reform Party Member of Parliament and a member of the New Zealand Legislative Council in the early 20th century.

Contents

Early life and family

Newman was born in the Partick area of Glasgow, Scotland, in 1858. His father, also called Edward Newman, was a surgeon in the Royal Navy and his mother was Annabella Newman (née Smith). He emigrated to New Zealand around 1875, and worked on sheep farms, until he took up his own property in the Turakina Valley in 1882. He returned to Glasgow to marry Catherine Ann Wilson in 1886. The couple had two children, one of whom died in infancy. [1]

Political career

New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateParty
1908 1909 17th Manawatu Independent
19091911Changed allegiance to: Reform
1911 1914 18th Rangitikei Reform
1914 1919 19th Rangitikei Reform
1919 1922 20th Manawatu Reform

He represented Manawatu from 1908, then Rangitikei from 1911, then Manawatu again from 1919. [2] He retired in 1922. [1] He was appointed to the New Zealand Legislative Council on 1 June 1923 and served one term until 31 May 1930. [3]

In the 1923 New Year Honours, Newman was appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George. [4] In 1935, he was awarded the King George V Silver Jubilee Medal. [5]

Flock House

Newman played an active role in establishing Flock House. He wanted the farmers of New Zealand to acknowledge the efforts of the British seamen who kept the sea lanes open during World War I. He established a fund so that the sons of British seamen who had been killed or wounded could be trained in New Zealand to start a new life, in conjunction with the Sheepfarmers' Association of New Zealand.

A property was purchased in 1924, and Flock House remained an agricultural training facility until 1988. [6]

Notes

  1. 1 2 Melody, Paul. "Edward Newman". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 23 April 2017.
  2. Scholefield 1950, p. 129.
  3. Scholefield 1950, p. 82.
  4. "No. 32782". The London Gazette (Supplement). 1 January 1923. p. 4.
  5. "Official jubilee medals". The Evening Post . Vol. CXIX, no. 105. 6 May 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 16 November 2013.
  6. Berry, John – Eastwoodhill, a Man's Tall Dream. Gisborne, New Zealand, 1997, p.17f

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References

New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Manawatu
19081911
19191922
In abeyance
Title next held by
himself
In abeyance
Title last held by
himself
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Rangitikei
19111919
Succeeded by