Edward Thurlow, 1st Baron Thurlow

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References

  1. "Thurlow, Edward (THRW748E)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Renton 1911.
  3. "No. 11880". The London Gazette . 2 June 1778. p. 1.
  4. Quarterly. The Society. 1953. p. 415.
  5. Mosley, Charles, editor. Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes. Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003. Volume 1, page 1000.
  6. Mosley, Charles, editor. Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes. Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003. Volume 3, page 3512.
  7. "No. 13424". The London Gazette . 9 June 1792. p. 396.
  8. Poynder, John (n.d.) [1844]. Literary Extracts. Vol. i. London: John Hatchard & Son. p.  268.

Bibliography

The Lord Thurlow
PC, KC
Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830) - Edward, First Lord Thurlow (1731-1806) - RCIN 400712 - Royal Collection.jpg
Portrait by Thomas Lawrence
Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain
Lord High Steward for the trial of Warren Hastings
In office
3 June 1778 7 April 1783
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Tamworth
1765–1778
With: Hon. Thomas Villiers to March 1768
William de Grey March–November 1768
Charles Vernon 1768–74
Thomas de Grey from 1774
Succeeded by
Legal offices
Preceded by Solicitor General for England and Wales
1770–1771
Succeeded by
Preceded by Attorney General for England and Wales
1771–1778
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain
1778–1783
In commission
Title next held by
Himself
Preceded by
In Commission
Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain
1783–1792
In commission
Title next held by
The Lord Loughborough
Preceded by Teller of the Exchequer
1786–1806
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Lord High Steward
1788–1792
Succeeded by
Peerage of Great Britain
New creation Baron Thurlow
1778–1806
Extinct
Baron Thurlow
1792–1806
Succeeded by