Edward Walpole

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Sir

Edward Walpole

SirEdwardWalpole.jpg
Born1706
Died12 January 1784 (age 77-78)
Residence Frogmore House, Windsor, Berkshire, England
Education Eton College
Alma mater King’s College, Cambridge
Lincoln's Inn
Parents
Relatives Walpole family

Sir Edward Walpole KB PC (Ire) (1706 12 January 1784) was a British politician, and a younger son of Sir Robert Walpole, Prime Minister from 1721 to 1742.

The Privy Council of Ireland was an institution of the Kingdom of Ireland until 31 December 1800 and of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1922. It performed a similar role in the Dublin Castle administration in Ireland to that of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in the government of the United Kingdom.

Robert Walpole British statesman

Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford,, known between 1725 and 1742 as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British statesman who is generally regarded as the de facto first Prime Minister of Great Britain.

Contents

Early life

The second son of Sir Robert Walpole, he was educated at Eton (1718) and King’s College, Cambridge (1725) and studied law at Lincoln's Inn (1723), where he was called to the bar in 1727. He undertook a Grand Tour in Italy in 1730.

Eton College British independent boarding school located in Eton

Eton College is an English 13–18 independent boarding school and sixth form for boys in the parish of Eton, near Windsor in Berkshire. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as Kynge's College of Our Ladye of Eton besyde Windesore , as a sister institution to King's College, Cambridge, making it the 18th-oldest Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference school.

Lincolns Inn one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. Lincoln's Inn is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious professional bodies of judges and lawyers.

Grand Tour Journey around Europe for cultural education

The "Grand Tour" was the 17th- and 18th-century custom of a traditional trip of Europe undertaken by upper-class young European men of sufficient means and rank when they had come of age. Young women of equally sufficient means ("debutantes"), or those of either gender of a more humble origin who could find a sponsor, could also partake. The custom—which flourished from about 1660 until the advent of large-scale rail transport in the 1840s and was associated with a standard itinerary—served as an educational rite of passage. Though the Grand Tour was primarily associated with the British nobility and wealthy landed gentry, similar trips were made by wealthy young men of other Protestant Northern European nations, and, from the second half of the 18th century, by some South and North Americans. By the mid 18th century, the Grand Tour had become a regular feature of aristocratic education in Central Europe, as well, although it was restricted to the higher nobility. The tradition declined as enthusiasm for neo-classical culture waned, and with the advent of accessible rail and steamship travel—an era in which Thomas Cook made the "Cook's Tour" of early mass tourism a byword.

Political career

Walpole first entered Parliament as Member for Lostwithiel in a by-election on 29 April 1730, following the death of Sir Edward Knatchbull earlier that month. He was appointed junior Secretary to the Treasury the same year.

Parliament of Great Britain parliament from 1714 to 1800

The Parliament of Great Britain was formed in 1707 following the ratification of the Acts of Union by both the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. The Acts created a new unified Kingdom of Great Britain and dissolved the separate English and Scottish parliaments in favour of a single parliament, located in the former home of the English parliament in the Palace of Westminster, near the City of London. This lasted nearly a century, until the Acts of Union 1800 merged the separate British and Irish Parliaments into a single Parliament of the United Kingdom with effect from 1 January 1801.

Lostwithiel was a rotten borough in Cornwall which returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons in the English and later British Parliament from 1304 to 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

By-elections, also spelled bye-elections, are used to fill elected offices that have become vacant between general elections.

On 2 May 1734, in the next general election, he succeeded his uncle Horatio Walpole as Member of Parliament for Great Yarmouth in Norfolk, retaining the seat for nearly 34 years until the 1768 election, when his first cousin the Hon. Richard Walpole (son of Lord Walpole of Wolterton) replaced him.

Horatio Walpole, 1st Baron Walpole English diplomat

Horatio Walpole, 1st Baron Walpole of Wolterton,, English diplomatist, was a son of Robert Walpole of Houghton, Norfolk, and a younger brother of the Prime Minister of Great Britain Sir Robert Walpole.

Great Yarmouth (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Great Yarmouth is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Its MP is Brandon Lewis, Chairman of the Conservative Party, who has held the seat since the 2010 general election.

Richard Walpole (1728–1798) was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1768 to1784.

On 7 September 1737 the Duke of Devonshire was named Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and Walpole his Chief Secretary, though he also continued as Secretary to the Treasury. Walpole was sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland on 8 October that year and stood for Ballyshannon in the Irish House of Commons, a seat he held until 1760.

William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire British nobleman and Whig politician

William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire, was a British nobleman and Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1721 to 1729 when he inherited the Dukedom.

Lord Lieutenant of Ireland title of the chief governor of Ireland from the Williamite Wars of 1690 till the Partition of Ireland in 1922

Lord Lieutenant of Ireland was the title of the chief governor of Ireland from the Williamite Wars of 1690 until the Partition of Ireland in 1922. This spanned the Kingdom of Ireland (1541–1800) and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1922). The office, under its various names, was often more generally known as the viceroy, and his wife was known as the vicereine. The government of Ireland in practice was usually in the hands of the Lord Deputy up to the 17th century, and later of the Chief Secretary for Ireland. Although in the Middle Ages some Lords Deputy were Irish noblemen, only men from Great Britain, usually peers, were appointed to the office of Lord Lieutenant.

Chief Secretary for Ireland position

The Chief Secretary for Ireland was a key political office in the British administration in Ireland. Nominally subordinate to the Lord Lieutenant, and officially the "Chief Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant", from the early 19th century until the end of British rule he was effectively the government minister with responsibility for governing Ireland, roughly equivalent to the role of a Secretary of State. Usually it was the Chief Secretary, rather than the Lord Lieutenant, who sat in the British Cabinet. The Chief Secretary was ex officio President of the Local Government Board for Ireland from its creation in 1872.

On 9 May 1739 Edward Walpole's elder brother Robert, Lord Walpole resigned his post of Clerk of the Pells in order to become an Auditor of the Exchequer, and Edward was appointed to succeed him, holding the office until his death. On 27 August 1753 Walpole was made a Knight Companion of the Order of the Bath, the order re-founded by his father in 1725.

Robert Walpole, 2nd Earl of Orford British noble

Robert Walpole, 2nd Earl of Orford, KB, was a British peer and politician, styled Lord Walpole from 1723 to 1745.

Order of the Bath series of awards of an order of chivalry of the United Kingdom

The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. The name derives from the elaborate medieval ceremony for appointing a knight, which involved bathing as one of its elements. The knights so created were known as "Knights of the Bath". George I "erected the Knights of the Bath into a regular Military Order". He did not revive the Order of the Bath, since it had never previously existed as an Order, in the sense of a body of knights who were governed by a set of statutes and whose numbers were replenished when vacancies occurred.

Frogmore House Frogmore House, Windsor Great Park - geograph.org.uk - 265497.jpg
Frogmore House

Family

Walpole lived for a time at Frogmore House in Windsor, Berkshire which he bought in 1748 and sold in 1766. He then bought a house in Windsor, which he gave to his daughter Laura Keppel in 1778, and spent his last years in Isleworth, where he died in 1784. [1]

He had never married, but had a son (who predeceased him) and three daughters by his partner Dorothy Clement:

Laura, Maria, Charlotte and Edward Stephen Slaughter - Portrait of Sir Edward Walpole's Children - 31.106 - Minneapolis Institute of Arts.jpg
Laura, Maria, Charlotte and Edward

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References

Specific
  1. "Hon. Edward Walpole (1706-1784)". Royal Berkshire History. Retrieved 8 February 2018.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Anthony Cracherode
Sir Edward Knatchbull
Member of Parliament for Lostwithiel
1730 1734
With: Anthony Cracherode
Succeeded by
Richard Edgcumbe
Philip Lloyd
Preceded by
Horatio Walpole
William Townshend
Member of Parliament for Great Yarmouth
1734 1768
With: William Townshend 17341738
Roger Townshend 17381747
Charles Townshend 17471756
Charles Townshend 17561768
Succeeded by
Charles Townshend
Richard Walpole
Political offices
Preceded by
Horatio Walpole
Junior Secretary to the Treasury
17301739
Succeeded by
Stephen Fox
Preceded by
Walter Carey
(also spelt 'Cary')
Chief Secretary for Ireland
17371739
Succeeded by
Thomas Townshend
Preceded by
The Lord Walpole
Clerk of the Pells
17391784
Succeeded by
Isaac Barré
Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by
William James Conolly
Thomas Pearson
Member of Parliament for Ballyshannon
1737–1760
With: William James Conolly 1737–1754
Michael Clarke 1754–1761
Succeeded by
Michael Clarke
Thomas Conolly