Edwin O'Donovan

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Edwin O'Donovan
Born(1914-06-11)June 11, 1914
DiedApril 22, 2000(2000-04-22) (aged 85)
OccupationArt director
Years active1975-1981

Edwin O'Donovan (June 11, 1914 April 22, 2000) was an American art director. [1] He won an Academy Award in the category Best Art Direction for the film Heaven Can Wait . [2] [3]

Contents

Selected filmography

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References

  1. "Results page" . Retrieved June 19, 2015.[ permanent dead link ]
  2. "The 51st Academy Awards (1979) Nominees and Winners". Oscars.org. Retrieved July 22, 2011.
  3. "IMDb.com: Edwin O'Donovan - Awards". IMDb.com. Retrieved December 30, 2008.