Ehrgeiz

Last updated
Ehrgeiz
Ehrgeiz Pal.jpg
Developer(s) DreamFactory
Publisher(s) Arcade
Namco
PlayStation
Square PlayStation Network
Director(s) Seiichi Ishii
Producer(s) Hirohide Sugiura
Designer(s) Seiichi Ishii
Artist(s) Tetsuya Nomura
Composer(s) Takayuki Nakamura
Platform(s) Arcade, PlayStation, PlayStation Network
ReleaseArcade
PlayStation
  • JP: December 17, 1998
  • NA: April 30, 1999
  • PAL: February 8, 2000
  • JP: September 28, 2000
[1] (re-release)
PlayStation Network
Genre(s) Fighting
Mode(s)Up to 2 players simultaneously
Cabinet Upright
Display Raster, 640 x 480 pixels (Horizontal), 65536 colors, 19 inch monitor

Ehrgeiz(エアガイツ,Eagaitsu, German: [ˈeːɐ̯ɡaɪ̯ts] "Ambition"), fully titled Ehrgeiz: God Bless The Ring, is a 3D fighting video game developed by DreamFactory and published by Namco in 1998 for the arcade platform. It was first ported to the PlayStation and published by Square Co. in 1998, then to Japan's PlayStation Network by Square Enix in 2008.

A fighting game is a video game genre based around close combat between a limited amount of characters, in a stage in which the boundaries are fixed. The characters fight each others until they defeat their opponents or the time expires. The matches typically consist of several rounds, in a arena, with each character having different abilities but each is relatively viable to choose. Players must master techniques such as blocking, counter-attacking, and chaining attacks together into "combos". Starting in the early 1990s, most fighting games allowed the player to execute special attacks by performing specific input combinations. The fighting game genre is related to but distinct from beat 'em ups, which involve large numbers of enemies against the human player.

A video game developer is a software developer that specializes in video game development – the process and related disciplines of creating video games. A game developer can range from one person who undertakes all tasks to a large business with employee responsibilities split between individual disciplines, such as programming, design, art, testing, etc. Most game development companies have video game publisher financial and usually marketing support. Self-funded developers are known as independent or indie developers and usually make indie games.

DreamFactory Ltd. is a Japanese video game developer founded in 1995, based out of Tokyo. They are best known for developing fighting and beat 'em up games, such as the Tobal No. 1 fighting game series and the high-profile PlayStation 2 launch title The Bouncer, both developed under Square Co. The company's chairman, Seiichi Ishii, is an industry veteran who served as an early designer and director for two fighting game franchises: Virtua Fighter and Tekken.

Contents

The game includes characters from Final Fantasy VII . Cloud Strife and Tifa Lockhart are playable in the arcade and the PlayStation versions; in addition, Sephiroth, Yuffie Kisaragi, Vincent Valentine, Red XIII, and Zack Fair were added to the PlayStation version's roster.

<i>Final Fantasy VII</i> 1997 video game

Final Fantasy VII is a 1997 role-playing video game developed by Square for the PlayStation console. It is the seventh main installment in the Final Fantasy series. Published in Japan by Square, it was released in other regions by Sony Computer Entertainment and became the first in the main series to see a PAL release. The game's story follows Cloud Strife, a mercenary who joins an eco-terrorist organization to stop a world-controlling megacorporation from using the planet's life essence as an energy source. Events send Cloud and his allies in pursuit of Sephiroth, a superhuman intent on destroying their planet. During the journey, Cloud builds close friendships with his party members, including Aerith Gainsborough, who holds the secret to saving their world.

Cloud Strife protagonist in Final Fantasy VII

Cloud Strife is a fictional character and the main protagonist of Square's 1997 role-playing video game Final Fantasy VII and several of its sequels and spin-offs. In Final Fantasy VII, Cloud is a mercenary claiming to be formerly of SOLDIER, a group of elite supersoldiers employed by the Shinra Electric Power Company, a megacorporation responsible for draining the life from the planet. Fighting against Shinra in the resistance group AVALANCHE, and driven by a feud with the primary antagonist, Sephiroth, Cloud learns to accept his troubled past and adapts to his role as a leader. Cloud reappears as the protagonist in the 2005 computer-animated sequel film, Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, in which he fights a new threat to the world while dealing with a sickness that infected his body. He acts in a supporting role in other Compilation of Final Fantasy VII titles and is featured in several other games outside the Final Fantasy VII continuity. Additionally, he has been featured in Nintendo's Super Smash Bros. series, and the Kingdom Hearts series by Square Enix.

Tifa Lockhart character in Final Fantasy VII

Tifa Lockhart is a fictional character in Square's role-playing video game Final Fantasy VII. Created and designed by Tetsuya Nomura, she has since appeared in the fighting game Ehrgeiz and made cameo appearances in several other titles, as well as the CGI film sequel to Final Fantasy VII, Advent Children and related games and media in the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII series.

Gameplay

Battle system

Ehrgeiz differs from most 3D fighting games by drawing heavily from the concepts of wrestling games and Dream Factory's own Tobal series, which allows for full 360-degree movement and does not require fighters to be facing one another at all times. This restricts the camera to a more or less fixed position, zooming in and out with the action, but not tracking around the arena as would be common in most other 2D and 3D fighting games. The fast-paced fighting allows for characters to move freely in a 3-dimensional stage which is filled with many interactive objects and changes in elevation, allowing characters to leap on top of crates or use them as weapons, for example.

3D computer graphics graphics that use a three-dimensional representation of geometric data

3D computer graphics or three-dimensional computer graphics, are graphics that use a three-dimensional representation of geometric data that is stored in the computer for the purposes of performing calculations and rendering 2D images. Such images may be stored for viewing later or displayed in real-time.

Professional wrestling entertainment form that mimics contact sports

Professional wrestling is a form of performance art and entertainment that combines athletics with theatrical performance. It takes the form of events, held by touring companies, that mimic a title-match combat sport. The unique form of sport portrayed is fundamentally based on classical and "catch" wrestling, with modern additions of striking attacks, strength-based holds and throws and acrobatic maneuvers. Much of these derive from the influence of various international martial arts. An additional aspect of combat with improvised weaponry is sometimes included to varying degrees.

<i>Tobal No. 1</i> video game

Tobal No. 1 is a fighting video game for the PlayStation developed by DreamFactory and published by Square in 1996. The game was DreamFactory's first release, as well as Square's first release on the CD-based console.

Quest Mode

The PlayStation version includes a Quest Mode, similar to Tobal No. 1 and Tobal 2 , titled Brand New Quest: The Forsaken Dungeon. Players fight through an extensive dungeon crawl, much like the Blizzard title Diablo , and can equip different weapons and items. There are also several smaller minigames, such as a race mode, where players run laps around a course while engaging in combat to slow down their opponent, and a board game similar to Reversi.

<i>Tobal 2</i> 1997 video game

Tobal 2 is a 3D fighting video game developed by DreamFactory and released by Square in Japan in 1997. It is the sequel to Tobal No. 1. The game was re-released in 2007 under Square Enix's "Legendary Hits" label.

Dungeon crawl video game genre

A dungeon crawl is a type of scenario in fantasy role-playing games in which heroes navigate a labyrinthine environment, battling various monsters, avoiding traps, solving puzzles, and looting any treasure they may find. Because of its simplicity, a dungeon crawl can be easier for a gamemaster to run than more complex adventures, and the "hack and slash" style of play is appreciated by players who focus on action and combat. However dungeon crawls often lack meaningful plot or logical consistency.

Blizzard Entertainment video game publisher and developer

Blizzard Entertainment, Inc. is an American video game developer and publisher based in Irvine, California, and is a subsidiary of Activision Blizzard. The company was founded on February 8, 1991, under the name Silicon & Synapse, Inc. by three graduates of the University of California, Los Angeles: Michael Morhaime, Frank Pearce and Allen Adham. The company originally concentrated on the creation of game ports for other studios' games before beginning development of their own software in 1993 with games like Rock n' Roll Racing and The Lost Vikings. In 1994 the company became Chaos Studios, Inc., then Blizzard Entertainment after being acquired by distributor Davidson & Associates.

Quest Mode is a hack and slash action RPG mode of gameplay in Ehrgeiz. It begins in a dungeon in a parallel universe, and later moves to a nearby inn. The player can explore the town and enter the dungeon, which contains randomly generated maps. Somewhere on each floor of the dungeon will be a stairway to the next level downward in the dungeon. Since the main characters are archaeologists, the goal revolves around going as deep in the dungeon as possible in the hopes of finding great artifacts. Two characters are available for this mode: Clair Andrews and Koji Masuda. The player can switch between the two by visiting the inn. If one character dies in the dungeon, the other can "resurrect" him/her by finding the corpse.

The character development system revolves mainly around a five-point chart representing which statistics will be increased in the character upon raising his/her level. Consuming Protein, Vitamins, Minerals, Carbohydrates, or Lipids will in turn increase Attack, Magic, Dexterity, Speed, or Defense, respectively. The diagram points and stretches towards each of these points. As one point is focused on, the diagram will contract on the other points of the diagram. Thus, increasing how much one stat will raise will lower how much the other stats will raise.

A major facet of the Quest Mode is hunger management. Each monster can drop a food item which will fill the hunger bar slightly, and supply the player with one of the previously mentioned nutrients. Eating while the hunger bar is full will increase the maximum size of their stomach (though the actual size of the bar on the screen remains the same, the number of units represented is greater). This effect also applies when drinking health potions while the HP meter is full.

There are several recipe books hidden throughout the Quest portion of the game's dungeon. Wine trading is available after getting the second recipe book and talking to a man in a restaurant in the town. The player can buy and trade wine here much like a stock market, where the value of the wine will go up and down periodically. Players can then trade back the wine either to earn or lose profit.

Characters

Original characters

Kazuya Mishima Character in Tekken

Kazuya Mishima is a fictional character in Bandai Namco's Tekken fighting game series, first featured as the protagonist in the original 1994 game. The son of worldwide conglomerate Mishima Zaibatsu CEO Heihachi Mishima, Kazuya seeks revenge against his father for throwing him down a cliff years earlier. Kazuya becomes corrupted in later games, seeking to obtain more power. Kazuya possesses the Devil Gene, a mutation which can transform him into a demonic being known as Devil. Devil has often appeared as a separate character in various games. Kazuya is also present in related series media and other games.

Jin Kazama is a fictional character and main protagonist of the Tekken fighting game series released by Namco Bandai Games. He was introduced in the 1997 game Tekken 3. Jin has been consistently voiced by Isshin Chiba since he debuted in Tekken 3 and has had multiple English actors across other appearances. Jin was created to be the new protagonist of the series whose constant fights with his family members would eventually lead him to become an antihero, as crafted by Bandai Namco director Katsuhiro Harada.

Hwoarang, or Hwoa Rang, is a fictional character from the Tekken fighting game series released by Namco Bandai Games. Hwoarang first appeared in Tekken 3 and he has returned in all subsequent games. He is the Taekwondo student of Baek Doo San, and entered the third Tournament to get revenge on Ogre for attacking his master. He also became Jin Kazama's rival and friend after the two fought to a draw in one of Hwoarang's street matches before the events of Tekken 3.

Final Fantasy VII characters

In the arcade version, Cloud, Tifa, and Django were revealed after thirty, sixty, and ninety days, respectively, after the initial install and boot of the game.

Development

Ehrgeiz was developed by DreamFactory, who previously developed the Tobal fighting games for Square. The game was directed and designed by Virtua Fighter and Tekken designer Seiichi Ishii. The game's characters, both the original ones and those from Final Fantasy VII, were designed by Tetsuya Nomura. Ehrgeiz was announced as the first project to result from a licensing agreement allowing Square to develop games for Namco's Namco System 12 arcade board. [3] It was released in arcades in 1998 as a joint venture between Square and Namco. [4] After the game's US release on the PlayStation, Square Electronic Arts sponsored the "Ehrgeiz Championship Tour," a series of contests in which players competed against one another playing the game. The contests were held at Electronics Boutique and Babbages stores across America, beginning on July 10, 1999 in New York. [5] In 2000, Ehrgeiz was re-released as part of the Square Millennium Collection in Japan. It included a collectable digital clock and character diorama. [1]

Music

Ehrgeiz Original Soundtrack contains sixty-one musical tracks from the game. It was composed by Takayuki Nakamura, who previously composed the DreamFactory and Square collaboration Tobal 2. It was released on November 21, 1998 by DigiCube. [6]

Reception

Reception
Aggregate score
AggregatorScore
GameRankings 76% [7]
Review scores
PublicationScore
GameSpot 5.8/10 [8]
IGN 7.5/10 [9]
Next Generation Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [10]

Ehrgeiz sold over 222,000 copies in Japan by the end of 1998, and sold 340,937 copies in Japan by December 2004. [11] [12] It has scored a 32 out of 40 points by the Japanese gaming publication Famitsu . [13] IGN rated the game a 7.5 or "Good", citing the game's beautiful graphics and presentation but noting both its generally simplistic gameplay and very difficult combination move executions. [9] GameSpot concurred, writing that the blocking controls were "unintuitive" and generally disappointing mini-games outweighed the games beautiful graphics and Full Motion Videos. [8] In November 2000, the game was ranked #73 on the magazine's top 100 PlayStation games of all time. [14] Ehrgeiz currently has an aggregate score of 76% on GameRankings based on twenty-one media outlets. [7] Later reviews reflected the strange use of famous Square Enix characters with "generic moves" and primarily wrestling-based combat. [15]

Next Generation reviewed the PlayStation version of the game, rating it three stars out of five, and stated that "Technologically speaking, Ehrgeiz is an impressive fighter, but it does have balance problems, especially the one-button gameplay of the one-player game. Still, it's good to see developers straying from the accepted formula with new fighting designs that truly work." [10]

Similar titles

Related Research Articles

<i>Soulcalibur</i> (video game) video game

Soulcalibur is a weapon-based 3D fighting game developed by Project Soul and produced by Namco. It is the second game in the Soulcalibur series, preceded by Soul Edge in December 1995. Originally released in arcades in July 1998, it ran on the Namco System 12 hardware. It was ported to the Dreamcast in 1999 with new features and improved graphics. The North American version was released in September 1999 as a launch game for the Dreamcast and was part of the successful launch of the new console. It became available as a downloadable title on the Xbox 360's Xbox Live Marketplace in July 2008 and it is forward compatible with the Xbox One along with the sequel, Soulcalibur II.

<i>Soul Edge</i> video game

Soul Edge is a fighting game developed by the team Project Soul and published by Namco as the first installment in the Soul series of 3D fighting games. Originally released as an arcade game in December 1995, an upgraded and expanded version of the game was ported to the PlayStation in December 1996. The PlayStation version was renamed Soul Blade in North America, Europe, and Australia.

<i>Tekken</i> fighting video game series

Tekken is a Japanese media franchise centered on a series of fighting video and arcade games developed and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. The franchise also includes film and print adaptations.

<i>Tekken 4</i> video game

Tekken 4 (鉄拳4) is a 2001 fighting video game developed and published by Namco as the fourth main installment in the Tekken series. It was released as an arcade game in 2001 and on the PlayStation 2 in 2002.

<i>Tekken 5</i> 2004 video game

Tekken 5 (鉄拳5) is a fighting game developed and published by Namco in 2004 for the arcades and in 2005 for the PlayStation 2. It is the fifth main installment, in the Tekken series, marking the tenth anniversary of the series. The game was upgraded to Tekken 5.1, which had mostly balance changes to the gameplay, and later an update Tekken 5: Dark Resurrection which was released for arcades in 2005 and later ported to the PlayStation Portable as Tekken: Dark Resurrection and on the PlayStation 3.

Yuffie Kisaragi character in Final Fantasy

Yuffie Kisaragi is a video game character from Square Enix's Final Fantasy series. Designed by Tetsuya Nomura, she was first introduced in the 1997 role-playing video game Final Fantasy VII as a young female ninja princess and thief. She can become one of the game's player characters after finishing a special sidequest. Yuffie reappears in the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII series, expanding her background and showing her after the events of the original game.

Heihachi Mishima Character in Tekken

Heihachi Mishima is a fictional character of Namco's Tekken fighting game series. Introduced as the boss character from the first Tekken video game from 1994, Heihachi appears as the leader of an empire known as the Mishima Zaibatsu. He was the protagonist of Tekken 2, and was a boss character in two additional installments. He is opposed by many of his relatives who wish his death and taking over the Zaibatsu across the series after Heihachi betrayed them whereas Heihachi wants to defeat his son and grandson, Kazuya Mishima and Jin Kazama respectively, in order to obtain their Devil Gene powers. Heihachi's past and motives are revealed in Tekken 7 which is said to be his final appearance in story.

<i>Tekken 6</i> video game

Tekken 6 is a fighting game developed and published by Bandai Namco Games. It is the sixth main installment in the Tekken franchise. It was released in Japanese arcades on November 26, 2007 as the first game running on the PlayStation 3-based System 357 arcade board. A year later, the game received an update, subtitled Bloodline Rebellion. A home version based on the update was released for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 on October 27, 2009, becoming the first time a main installment was produced for a non-Sony console. It was later ported for the PlayStation Portable on November 24, 2009. The game was produced by Katsuhiro Harada, who aimed to give the fights a strategic style while remaining faithful to the previous games in the series.

Yoshimitsu character in Tekken

Yoshimitsu (吉光) is a name used by several player characters in the Tekken and Soulcalibur series of fighting games by Namco. He is one of the six characters to have appeared in all the main Tekken installments with the exception of Tekken Revolution. Although details of the character's biographies have varied in different games and other media, each Yoshimitsu is consistently portrayed as the leader of the honorable Manji Clan, a practitioner of ninjutsu, and a master swordsman with a mechanical prosthetic arm. The characters have been well received by both fans of the series and critics alike.

Ogre (Tekken) character in Tekken

Ogre known in Japan as Toshin is a fictional character from the Tekken fighting game franchise by Bandai Namco Entertainment. He is introduced in Tekken 3 as an Aztec fighting god who is the game's main villain and final boss, along with his grotesque alter ego, True Ogre. Since his debut, Ogre has featured intermittently in the Tekken series with non-player roles in Tekken 4 as cameo and Tekken 5 in Devil Within Mode, with several appearances in crossover games outside the Tekken franchise. He has received mostly positive critical reception for his design and characterization.

<i>Tekken 5: Dark Resurrection</i> 2005 video game

Tekken 5: Dark Resurrection is a fighting video game and an update to the PlayStation 2 game Tekken 5. The arcade version was released in Japan in December of 2005 and in North America in February of 2006, while the PSP version was released as a home version of the Tekken series later that year in July 2006. The game was also released as a downloadable game on the PlayStation 3 via the PlayStation Network online service in Japan in 2006 and the rest of the world in 2007. A sequel, Tekken 6 was released in 2007.

<i>Tekken</i> (video game) 1994 video game

Tekken (鉄拳) is a fighting video game developed and published by Namco. It was released in arcades in December 1994 and on the PlayStation in 1995. It was the first entry in the popular Tekken series, succeeded by Tekken 2 in August 1995. The arcade game features eight playable characters, while the PlayStation version features 17 playable characters in the roster.

Seiichi Ishii is a Japanese game designer. He is best known for the development of fighting games.

Lars Alexandersson character in Tekken 6

Lars Alexandersson is a fictional character from the Tekken fighting game franchise by Bandai Namco Entertainment. First introduced in the 2008 game Tekken 6: Bloodline Rebellion, he became the main protagonist in the console versions of Tekken 6.

<i>Tekken 7</i> 2016 fighting video game

Tekken 7 (鉄拳7) is a fighting game developed and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. The game is the seventh installment in the Tekken series, and the first to make use of Unreal Engine 4. Tekken 7 had a limited arcade release in Japan in March 2015. An updated arcade version, Tekken 7: Fated Retribution, was released in Japan in July 2016, and features expanded content including new stages, costumes, items and characters. The same version was released for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in June 2017.

<i>Tales of Phantasia</i> 1995 SNES game in the role-playing video game genre

Tales of Phantasia is a role-playing video game originally developed by Wolf Team. It is the first title in Namco's Tales series. Initially released for the Super Famicom in December 1995, it was later ported to a number of other platforms, including a Japan-exclusive version for the PlayStation in December 1998 and a Game Boy Advance version published by Namco in Japan in August 2003 and later published by Nintendo in North America and Europe in March 2006, which marked the first time the game was officially available in English. A PlayStation Portable remake known as Tales of Phantasia Full Voice Edition followed in September 2006, featuring full voice-acting during story scenes, which was later included with further enhancements as part of Tales of Phantasia: Narikiri Dungeon X in June 2010. The game's producers have given it the characteristic genre name Legendary RPG beginning with the PlayStation version, with the Full Voice Edition given the moniker Legendary RPG Embellished with Voices. An unofficial fan translation of the original Super Famicom version was released on February 12, 2001 by Dejap.

References

  1. 1 2 IGN staff (September 11, 2000). "New Square Millennium Collection Goods". IGN . Retrieved 2008-11-15.
  2. Frank Caron (2008-07-09). "Curses: Japan gets more Square-Enix PSX loving". Ars Technica. Retrieved 2008-07-09.
  3. "Press Start". Electronic Gaming Monthly . No. 99. Ziff Davis. October 1997. p. 31.
  4. Ciolek, Todd (February 17, 2007). "'Might Have Been' - Ehrgeiz". GameSetWatch. Retrieved 2008-10-07.
  5. PSX.IGN.com (June 3, 1999). "Massive Ehrgeiz Tournament". PSX-Critique. Archived from the original on March 9, 2012. Retrieved 2008-06-16.
  6. "Ehrgeiz Original Soundtrack". Chudah's Corner. Archived from the original on 2005-04-15. Retrieved 2005-07-20.
  7. 1 2 "Ehrgeiz for PlayStation". GameRankings . CBS Interactive . Retrieved 2019-03-01.
  8. 1 2 Gamespot Staff (1999-01-12). "Ehrgeiz Review". GameSpot . Retrieved 2015-04-17.
  9. 1 2 Perry, Doug (1999-05-05). "Ehrgeiz: God Bless the Ring". IGN . Retrieved 2015-04-17.
  10. 1 2 "Finals". Next Generation . No. 55. Imagine Media. July 1999. p. 92.
  11. "1998年ゲームソフト年間売上TOP100" [1998 Game Software Annual Sales Top 100]. Famitsū Gēmu Hakusho 1999ファミ通ゲーム白書1999 [Famitsu Game Whitebook 1999] (in Japanese). Tokyo: Enterbrain. 1999.
  12. "Sony PlayStation Japanese Ranking". Japan-GameCharts. Archived from the original on 2008-12-30. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  13. Chinn, Marty (June 23, 2000). "Famitsu Top 120 PlayStation games". Gaming-Age. Archived from the original on 2011-06-05. Retrieved 2008-11-15.
  14. IGN staff (November 20, 2000). "Famitsu Weekly PlayStation Top 100". IGN . Retrieved 2008-11-15.
  15. Meunier, Nathan (2013-09-23). "THE STRANGEST AND COOLEST FINAL FANTASY SPIN-OFFS". IGN . Retrieved 2015-04-17.