Elena Lucena

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Elena Lucena
Elena Lucena.JPG
Born
María Elena Lucena

(1914-09-25)25 September 1914
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Died7 October 2015(2015-10-07) (aged 101)
NationalityArgentine
Occupationactress
Years active1937–2012

María Elena Lucena Arcuri (25 September 1914 – 7 October 2015) was an Argentine film actress of the Golden Age of Argentine Cinema (1940–60). She began her career in radio in the 1930s and reached her greatest success with the role of "Chimbela", which was later depicted in film, theater and television. Her extensive film career includes approximately 50 films, including notable performances in Chimbela (1939) and Una noche cualquiera (1951). During the 1940s she participated in films with comedians like Pepe Arias, Pepe Iglesias "El Zorro", Niní Gambier  [ es ], Mirtha Legrand and Carlos Estrada. Her most acclaimed film work occurred in Elvira Fernández, vendedora de tienda (1942) by Manuel Romero, Cinco besos by Luis Saslavsky and La Rubia Mireya for which she received the 1948 Best Comedy Actress Award from the Argentine Film Critics Association.

Chimbela is a 1939 Argentine musical film drama directed by José A. Ferreyra. The film stars Floren Delbene and Armando Bo. It premiered in Buenos Aires.

Pepe Arias Argentine actor

Pepe Arias was an Argentine actor and comedian.

Pepe Iglesias Argentine comediain

Pepe Iglesias, full name José Ángel Iglesias Sánchez, nicknamed El Zorro, was an Argentine comedian, who, though he developed much of his career in his home country, also spent time in Chile and Spain. At the 1945 Argentine Film Critics Association Awards Iglesias won the Silver Condor Award for Best Actor in a Comic Role for his performance in Mi novia es un fantasma (1944).

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She also performed as a dancer and, beginning in 1960, did several musical comedies. On stage she replaced Libertad Lamarque in Hello, Dolly! and she portrayed the widow of Larraín de Valenzuela in the Chilean comedy La pérgola de las flores, which was later made into a movie. Beginning in the late 1960s, she participated in several television roles. Her later performances include the series 099 Central (2002) and the 2010 film Brother and Sister for which she was nominated as Best Supporting Actress and a role in the 2012 TV movie El Tabarís, lleno de estrellas. She had one of the longest careers of Argentine actresses and was one of the last survivors of Argentine cinema from the 1930s. She retired in 2012.

Libertad Lamarque Argentinian actress and singer

Libertad Lamarque ; was an Argentine actress and singer, one of the icons of the Golden Age of Argentine and Mexican cinema. She achieved fame throughout Latin America, and became known as “La Novia de América”. By the time she died in 2000, she had appeared in 65 films and six soap operas, had recorded over 800 songs and had made innumerable theatrical appearances.

<i>Hello, Dolly!</i> (musical) 1964 Broadway musical

Hello, Dolly! is a 1964 musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilder's 1938 farce The Merchant of Yonkers, which Wilder revised and retitled The Matchmaker in 1955. The musical follows the story of Dolly Gallagher Levi, a strong-willed matchmaker, as she travels to Yonkers, New York to find a match for the miserly "well-known unmarried half-a-millionaire" Horace Vandergelder.

Brother and Sister is a 2010 Argentine comedy film directed by Daniel Burman.

Biography

Lucena was born on 25 September 1914 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She was working as a seamstress, getting paid eighty cents per dozen shirts made, when she made a radio test to sing tangos. Her mother was against it, but it paid 60 pesos per month. She took the contract at Radio Belgrano. [1] Beginning as a singer in 1937, she soon moved from singing into acting, reading tragic parts on Radio Belgrano, where it was noted that she had an expressive face. She moved to the National Radio as part of an acting troupe "Estampas porteñas" and soon after, caught the attention of Arsenio Mármol. He created a character called "Chimbela" for her which she performed on radio and later on film, theater and television. Almost immediately the role brought success and she began touring the country, [2] and appeared on both the Teatro Palmolive and Radio Cine Lux. [3]

Buenos Aires Place in Argentina

Buenos Aires is the capital and largest city of Argentina. The city is located on the western shore of the estuary of the Río de la Plata, on the South American continent's southeastern coast. "Buenos Aires" can be translated as "fair winds" or "good airs", but the former was the meaning intended by the founders in the 16th century, by the use of the original name "Real de Nuestra Señora Santa María del Buen Ayre". The Greater Buenos Aires conurbation, which also includes several Buenos Aires Province districts, constitutes the fourth-most populous metropolitan area in the Americas, with a population of around 15.6 million.

Her film debut was in La que no perdonó (1938), under the direction of José A. Ferreyra with Elsa O'Connor, Mario Danesi and José Olarra. [4] In 1939 her signature character was taken to film in a screenplay written by Antonio Botta and directed by Ferreyra and Lucena was the star of Chimbela , although it was only her second film. The story is of a young girl who is supporting her family and falls in love with a man who is running from the police for a murder he did not commit. The supporting cast included Eloy Álvarez, Floren Delbene, Mary Dormal, Nuri Montsé and others. [5] She also made her next two films El ángel de trapo (1940) and Pájaros sin nido (1940) with Ferreyra. [6] Some of her most memorable roles were: Ven mi corazón te llama (1942); [7] Elvira Fernández, vendedora de tiendas (1942) directed by Manuel Romero with Paulina Singerman; [8] Cinco Besos (1945) in which she worked with Mirtha Legrand; [9] La Rubia Mireya (1948) by Manuel Romero with Mecha Ortiz [4] for which she won Best Comic Actress from the Argentine Film Critics Association; [10] Una noche cualquiera (1951); [7] El Calavera (1954) by Carlos Borcosque; and La murga (1963) by René Mugica. [4]

La que no perdonó is a 1938 Argentine film directed by José A. Ferreyra. The film premiered in Buenos Aires.

José A. Ferreyra early Argentine film director, screenwriter and film producer

José A(gustín) Ferreyra, popularly known as "Negro Ferreyra", was an early Argentine film director, screenwriter and film producer. He was also sometimes credited as production designer.

Elsa OConnor Argentinian actor

Elsa O'Connor (1906–1947) was an Argentine stage and film actress.

In addition to film, Lucena worked in many of the theaters along Calle Corrientes and traveled with tours both throughout Argentina and through Brazil, Spain and Uruguay. Participating in both classic and modern works, some of her most memorable performances were in Cuando el gato no está, Cuando las mujeres dicen sí, Cuanta Milonga, Cuatro escalones abajo, El enfermo imaginario, Juanita la popular, Madame 13, Penélope ya no teje, La Pulga en la Oreja, Quien me presta una hija, Valss, Vengo por el aviso, and Una viuda difícil among others. [7] During Libertad Lamarque's run of Hello Dolly! , produced by Luis Sandrini and Daniel Tinayre, Lucena was called in to replace Lamarque. [11] She also performed in the Chilean musical La pérgola de las flores by Isidora Aguirre, which made a successful run throughout Latin America. [12]

Luis Sandrini Argentine actor

Luis Sandrini was a prolific Argentine comic film actor and film producer. Widely considered as one of the most respected and most acclaimed Argentine comedians by the public and critics. He has made over 80 appearances in film between 1933 and 1980.

Daniel Tinayre Argentine film director

Daniel Tinayre was a French-born Argentine film director, screenwriter and film producer.

Isidora Aguirre Chilean playwright

Isidora Aguirre Tupper was a Chilean writer, an author mainly of dramatic works on social issues that have been performed in many countries in the Americas and Europe. Her best known work is La pérgola de las flores, which, as the corresponding page of Memoria Chilena says, constituted "one of the milestones in the history of Chilean theater in the second half of the 20th century."

From the 1960s Lucena began working in television. Some of her most noted performances included Piel Naranja (1975), Duro como la piedra, frágil como el cristal (1985–1986), Como pan caliente (1996), 099 Central (2002) [7] and El Tabarís, lleno de estrellas (2012). [13] She died on 7 October 2015 at the age of 101. [14]

Awards and nominations

Filmography

Films

Television

See also

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References

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  2. Petti, Alicia (26 September 2004). "Los recuerdos de "Chimbela" y de la vida" (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: La Nacion. Retrieved 28 August 2015.
  3. "La actriz Elena Lucena, ciudadana ilustre de Buenos Aires" (in Spanish). San Juan, Argentina: Diario de Cuyo. 19 December 2006. Retrieved 28 August 2015.
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  5. Finkielman, Jorge (2003). The Film Industry in Argentina: An Illustrated Cultural History. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland. p. 242. ISBN   978-0-786-48344-0.
  6. Ferdinandy, Luis Trelles Plazaola ; translated by Yudit de (1989). South American cinema: dictionary of film makers (1st ed.). Río Piedras, P.R.: Editorial de la Universidad de Puerto Rico. pp. 88–89. ISBN   978-0-847-72011-8.
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