Elisheba

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Elisheba ( /əˈlɪʃɪbə/ ; אֱלִישֶׁבַע’Ělîšeḇa‘) was the wife of Aaron, who was Moses' elder brother and the ancestor of the Jewish high priests, according to the Hebrew Bible. [1]

She was said to be a daughter of Amminadab, and a sister of Nahshon, from the Tribe of Judah (Exodus 6:23). [2] The Hebrew name is composed of two parts. In one interpretation, "Eli" means "my God," and "sheba" means "oath," [3] so the name Eli-sheba can be translated as "God is (my) oath".

The Hebrew Bible records that Elisheba and Aaron had four sons: Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar (Exodus 6:23). Levitical priests or kohanim are traditionally believed and halakhically required to be of direct patrilineal descent from Aaron and Elisheba's two youngest sons, Eleazar and Ithamar.

In the New Testament, in first chapter of the Gospel according to Luke, a woman named Elisabet (Greek: Ἐλισάβετ [4] ) is said to be a descendant of Aaron and the wife of Zechariah, who was also a priest. She was a relative of Mary, mother of Jesus and gave birth to John the Baptist. [5] Elizabeth is the common modern English variant of Elisabet, derived from Elisheba. [6] A notable example is Queen Elizabeth II.

Alishba is a modern South Asian name that derives from Elisheba. [6] An example is the Pakistani actress Alishba Yousuf.

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Book of Leviticus Third book of the Bible

The Book of Leviticus is the third book of the Torah and of the Old Testament; scholars generally agree that it developed over a long period of time, reaching its present form during the Persian Period between 538–332 BC.

Aarons rod Staves carried by Mosess brother, Aaron, in the Torah

Aaron's rod refers to any of the walking sticks carried by Moses's brother, Aaron, in the Torah. The Bible tells how, along with Moses's rod, Aaron's rod was endowed with miraculous power during the Plagues of Egypt that preceded the Exodus. There are two occasions where the Bible tells of the rod's power.

Nadab and Abihu

In the biblical books Exodus, Leviticus and Numbers, Nadab and Abihu were the two oldest sons of Aaron. According to Leviticus 10, they offered a sacrifice with 'foreign fire' before the LORD, disobeying his instructions, and were immediately consumed by God's fire.

Amariah means "promised by God" in Hebrew. It was commonly used as a name of priests in the History of ancient Israel and Judah. It appear several times in the Hebrew Bible:

  1. One of the descendants of Aaron by Eleazar. He was probably the last of the high priests of Eleazar's line prior to the transfer of that office to Eli, of the line of Ithamar.
  2. A Levite, son of Hebron, of the lineage of Moses.
  3. A "chief priest" who took an active part in the reformation under Jehoshaphat ; probably the same as mentioned in 1 Chr. 6:9.
  4. 1 Chr. 6:11; Ezra 7:3.
  5. One of the high priests in the time of Hezekiah.
  6. Zeph. 1:1.
  7. Neh. 11:4.
  8. Neh. 10:3.
  9. Ezra 10:42.
Elizabeth (biblical figure) Mother of John the Baptist

Elizabeth was the mother of John the Baptist and the wife of Zechariah, according to the Gospel of Luke. She was past normal child-bearing years when she gave birth to John.

Eli (biblical figure)

Eli was, according to the Books of Samuel, a High Priest of Shiloh. When Hannah came to Shiloh to pray for a son, Eli initially accused her of drunkenness, but when she protested her innocence, Eli wished her well. Hannah's eventual child, Samuel, was raised by Eli in the tabernacle. When Eli failed to rein in the abusive behavior of his sons, God promised to punish his family, resulting eventually in the death of Eli and his sons. Later biblical passages mention the fortunes of several of his descendants, and he figures prominently in Samaritan tradition.

Eleazar

Eleazar or Elʽazar was a priest in the Hebrew Bible, the second High Priest, succeeding his father Aaron after he died. He was a nephew of Moses.

Zadok was a Kohen (priest), biblically recorded to be a descendant from Eleazar the son of Aaron. He was the High Priest of Israel during the reigns of David and Solomon. He aided King David during the revolt of his son Absalom, was subsequently instrumental in bringing Solomon to the throne and officiated at Solomon's coronation. After Solomon's building of the First Temple in Jerusalem, Zadok was the first High Priest to serve there.

In the Torah, Ithamar was the fourth son of Aaron the High Priest. Following the construction of the Tabernacle, he was responsible for recording an inventory to ensure that the constructed Tabernacle and its contents conformed to the vision given by God to Moses on Mount Sinai.

Luke 1

Luke 1 is the first chapter of the Gospel of Luke in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. With 80 verses, it is one of the longest chapters in the New Testament. This chapter describes the events leading up to the birth of Jesus. The unnamed author of Luke names its recipient, Theophilus, who is most likely a real person or could simply mean a fellow believer, since theophilus is Greek for God lover. Acts of the Apostles, the companion volume of Luke, is addressed to Theophilus in the same way. The title "The Gospel of Luke", found in many Bibles and some manuscripts, was added later with no indication that it was originally part of the text. The book containing this chapter is anonymous, but early Christian tradition uniformly affirm that Luke composed this Gospel as well as the Acts of the Apostles.

High priest was the title of the chief religious official of Judaism from the early post-Exilic times until the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 70 CE. Previously, in the Israelite religion including the time of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, other terms were used to designate the leading priests; however, as long as a king was in place, the supreme ecclesiastical authority lay with him. The official introduction of the term "high priest" went hand in hand with a greatly enhanced ritual and political significance bestowed upon the chief priest in the post-Exilic period, certainly from 411 BCE onward, after the religious transformations brought about by the Babylonian captivity and due to the lack of a Jewish king and kingdom.

Phinehas

According to the Hebrew Bible, Phinehas or Phineas was a priest during the Israelites’ Exodus journey. The grandson of Aaron and son of Eleazar, the High Priests, he distinguished himself as a youth at Shittim with his zeal against the heresy of Peor. Displeased with the immorality with which the Moabites and Midianites had successfully tempted the Israelites to inter-marry and to worship Baal-peor, Phinehas personally executed an Israelite man and a Midianite woman while they were together in the man's tent, running a javelin or spear through the man and the belly of the woman, bringing to an end the plague sent by God to punish the Israelites for sexually intermingling with the Midianites.

Jedaiah was a priest of ancient Israel after the order of Aaron, during the reign of King David in the 10th century BCE. Jedaiah led the second of the 24 priestly divisions. The biblical passage of 1 Chronicles 24 documents the division of the priests during the reign of King David. These priests were all descendants of Aaron, who had four sons: Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar. However, Nadab and Abihu died before Aaron and only Eleazar and Ithamar had sons. One priest, Zadok, from Eleazar's descendants and another priest, Ahimelech, from Ithamar's descendants were designated to help create the various priestly orders. Sixteen of Eleazar's descendants were selected to head priestly orders while only eight of Ithamar's descendants were so chosen. The passage states that this was done because of the greater number of leaders among Eleazar's descendants. Lots were drawn to designate the order of ministering for the heads of the priestly orders when they entered the temple. Since each order was responsible for ministering during a different week, Jedaiah's order was stationed as a watch at the Tabernacle during the second week of the year on the Hebrew calendar.

Seorim was a priest of ancient Israel after the order of Aaron, during the reign of King David in the 10th century BCE. Seorim lead the fourth of the 24 priestly divisions. The biblical passage of 1 Chronicles 24 documents the division of the priests during the reign of King David. These priests were all descendants of Aaron, who had four sons: Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar. However, Nadab and Abihu died before Aaron and only Eleazar and Ithamar had sons. One priest, Zadok, from Eleazar's descendants and another priest, Ahimelech, from Ithamar's descendants were designated to help create the various priestly orders. Sixteen of Eleazar's descendants were selected to head priestly orders while only eight of Ithamar's descendants were so chosen. The passage states that this was done because of the greater number of leaders among Eleazar's descendants. Lots were drawn to designate the order of ministering for the heads of the priestly orders when they entered the temple. Since each order was responsible for ministering during a different week, Seorim's order was stationed as a watch at the Tabernacle during the fourth week of the year on the Hebrew calendar.

Malchijah is a biblical name belonging to several persons mentioned in the Hebrew Bible and means "Yahu is King" or "the king is Yahu".

The Sons of Zadok are a family of priests, kohens, descended from Zadok, the first high priest in Solomon's Temple.

1 Chronicles 15

1 Chronicles 15 is the fifteenth chapter of the Books of Chronicles in the Hebrew Bible or the First Book of Chronicles in the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. The book is compiled from older sources by an unknown person or group, designated by modern scholars as "the Chronicler", and had the final shape established in late fifth or fourth century BCE. This chapter contains the account of successful transportation of the Ark of the Covenant to the City of David in Jerusalem. The whole chapter belongs to the section focusing on the kingship of David.

1 Chronicles 24

1 Chronicles 24 is the twenty-fourth chapter of the Books of Chronicles in the Hebrew Bible or the First Book of Chronicles in the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. The book is compiled from older sources by an unknown person or group, designated by modern scholars as "the Chronicler", and had the final shape established in late fifth or fourth century BCE. This chapter records the organization and departments of priests and a list of non-priestly Levites. The whole chapter belongs to the section focusing on the kingship of David, which from chapter 22 to the end does not have any parallel in 2 Samuel.

References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-02-24. Retrieved 2014-02-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. Book of Exodus, Chapter 6
  3. Gesenius' dictionary, 45. el
  4. Englishman's Concordance, Ἐλισάβετ
  5. Gospel according to Luke, Chapter 1
  6. 1 2 Thomas, Siobhan (2016). Best Baby Names for 2017: Over 8,000 names and 100 inspiration lists. London: Random House. p. 365. ISBN   9781473528956 . Retrieved 12 August 2018.