Elizabeth Grey, 6th Baroness Lisle

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Elizabeth Grey
6th Baroness Lisle
Born1482/4
Died1525/6
Spouse(s) Edmund Dudley
Arthur Plantagenet
Issue John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland
Andrew Dudley
Jerome Dudley
Frances Plantagenet
Elizabeth Plantagenet
Bridget Plantagenet
Father Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Lisle
MotherElizabeth Talbot

Elizabeth Grey, 6th Baroness Lisle (c.1482/1484 c.1525/1526 [1] ) was an English noblewoman during the reigns of Henry VII and VIII.

Contents

Origins

Arms of Grey de Ruthyn: Barry of six argent and azure in chief three torteaux Coat of Arms of Grey.svg
Arms of Grey de Ruthyn: Barry of six argent and azure in chief three torteaux

Elizabeth Grey was the daughter of Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Lisle (d. 1492) by his wife Elizabeth Talbot (d. 1487), daughter and eventual heir of John Talbot, 1st Viscount Lisle (1423–1453). [2]

Marriages

Elizabeth married two times:

Succession to Barony of Lisle

On the death of her niece Elizabeth Grey, Viscountess Lisle (1505–1519), the daughter of her brother John Grey, 2nd Viscount Lisle (1481–1504) by his wife Muriel Howard, the barony of Lisle passed to Elizabeth, who thereby became suo jure Baroness Lisle. Her husband Arthur Plantagenet was created Viscount Lisle on 25 April 1523. He continued to hold the title after her death in 1525 or 1526. After Arthur Plantagenet's death in 1542, Henry VIII granted the viscountcy to Elizabeth Grey's eldest son by her first marriage, John Dudley, 1st Viscount Lisle, "by the right of his mother". [4] He was created Viscount Lisle on 12 March 1542, and was later created Duke of Northumberland. He forfeited his titles upon his execution and attainder in 1553.

Notes

  1. Grummitt 2008
  2. Byrne, Muriel St Clare, (ed.), The Lisle Letters, London & Chicago, 1981, 6 vols., vol.1, appendix 9, pedigree of Arthur Plantagenet, 1st Viscount Lisle
  3. Commire & Klezmer 1999, p. 529.
  4. Loades 1996, p. 48.

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References