Elsa Wagner

Last updated
Elsa Wagner
Born
Elisabeth Karoline Auguste Wagner

(1881-01-24)January 24, 1881
DiedAugust 17, 1975(1975-08-17) (aged 94)
Nationality German
Occupation Actress
Years active1916–1973

Elsa Wagner (24 January 1881– 17 August 1975) was a German actress who appeared in numerous theatrical productions and feature films during the 20th century, including 1920's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari . [1] [2]

Contents

Life and career

Elsa Wagner and Herma Clement performing their roles as attendants to Queen Luise (Emmy Sonnemann) in Hans Schwarz's 1935 Prinz von Preussen (Prince of Prussia). Bundesarchiv Bild 183-2005-1206-501, Emmy Sonnemann als Konigin Luise.jpg
Elsa Wagner and Herma Clement performing their roles as attendants to Queen Luise (Emmy Sonnemann) in Hans Schwarz's 1935 Prinz von Preussen (Prince of Prussia).
Grave in Friedhof Dahlem in Berlin-Dahlem Elsa Wagner, Friedhof Dahlem - Mutter Erde fec.JPG
Grave in Friedhof Dahlem in Berlin-Dahlem

Born as Elisabeth Karoline Auguste Wagner on January 24, 1881 in Reval in what is now Tallinn, Estonia, [3] Elsa Wagner pursued training with Maria Spettini in Saint Petersburg, Russia prior to making her acting debut in Berlin, Germany in 1901. In addition to her performances on tour with multiple theater productions, including Faust and Peer Gynt, she went on to secure roles in more than 140 feature films, including Robert Wiene's Das Cabinet Des Dr. Caligari (The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari) and Karl Heinz Martin's Von Morgens bis Mitternachts (From Morn to Midnight) in 1920, F. W. Murnau's 1922 Das Brennende Acker (The Burning Earth), Gerhard Lamprecht's Die Buddenbrooks and Wiene's I.N.R.I. in 1923, and E. R. Dupont's 1929 Atlantik . [4]

Wagner died in Berlin on August 17, 1975, and was interred at the Cemetery Dahlem.

Selected filmography

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References

  1. "Elsa Wagner". Archived from the original on 2012-10-23. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
  2. Robinson, David. "Das Cabinet Des Dr. Caligari", in British Film Institute Classics, Vol. 1, p. 28 of pp.1-28. London, United Kingdom: Fitzroy Deaborn: An Imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, 1997.
  3. "Wagner, Elsa, Actress" (photo with short bio). Seattle, Washington: Getty Images, retrieved online August 31, 2018.
  4. Eisner, Lotte H. The Haunted Screen: Expressionism in the German Cinema and the Influence of Max Reinhardt , pp. 349, 351, 354. Berkeley and Los Angeles, California: University of California Press, 1969.

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