Emperor Wuzong of Tang

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Emperor Wuzong of Tang
Tang Wuzong.jpg
Emperor of the Tang dynasty
ReignFebruary 20, 840 [1] [2] – April 22, 846
Predecessor Emperor Wenzong
Successor Emperor Xuanzong
BornJuly 2, 814 [1] [2]
DiedApril 22, 846 [1] [2] (aged 31)
Burial
Duanling
IssueSee § Family
Era name and dates
Huìchāng (會昌): January 27, 841 [1] [3] – January 21, 847 [1] [4]
Posthumous name
Emperor Zedao Zhaosui Xiao 至道昭肅孝皇帝
Temple name
Wuzong 武宗
Dynasty Tang
Father Emperor Muzong
MotherEmpress Xuanyi
Religion Taoism
Tang Wuzong
Chinese
Literal meaning"Martial Ancestor of the Tang"
Emperor Dezong of Tang (742–805)
Emperor Shunzong of Tang (761–806)
Empress Zhaode (d. 786)
Emperor Xianzong of Tang (778–820)
Wang Ziyan
Empress Zhuangxian (763–816)
Emperor Muzong of Tang (795–824)
Guo Ziyi (697–781)
Guo Ai (752–800)
Lady Wang (704–777)
Empress Yi'an (d. 851)
Emperor Daizong of Tang (726–779)
Princess Qizhaoyi (d. 810)
Lady Cui of Boling (d. 757)
Emperor Wuzong of Tang (814–846)
Lian Yixun
Lian Hua
Empress Xuanyi

In fiction

Played by Edwin Siu, a fictionalized version of Wuzong was portrayed in 2009 Hong Kong's TVB television series, Beyond the Realm of Conscience.

See also

Related Research Articles

Emperor Xuanzong of Tang (9th century) Emperor of Tang China from 846 to 859 AD

Emperor Xuanzong of Tang was an emperor in the latter part of the Tang dynasty of China. Personally named Li Yi, later renamed Li Chen, and known before his reign as the Prince of Guang, he was considered the last capable emperor of Tang China. Succeeding emperors after Xuanzong would either be too young or be dominated by eunuchs or warlords. Emperor Xuanzong was the 13th son of Emperor Xianzong and an uncle of the previous three emperors, Emperor Jingzong, Emperor Wenzong, and Emperor Wuzong.

Emperor Wenzong of Tang Emperor of Tang China from 827 to 840 AD

Emperor Wenzong of Tang (809–840), personal name Li Ang, né Li Han (李涵), was an emperor of the Tang dynasty of China. He reigned from 827 to 840. Emperor Wenzong was the second son of Emperor Muzong and younger brother of Emperor Jingzong. A rare occurrence in Chinese history, Emperor Wenzong, along with his elder brother Emperor Jingzong and younger brother Emperor Wuzong, reigned in succession.

Princess Taihe, later known as Princess Ding'an (定安公主) or Princess Anding (安定公主), was a princess of the Chinese Tang Dynasty and a Khatun (empress) of Huigu. She was married to Huige's Chongde Khan as part of the Heqin system of marriages between Tang princesses and Huigu khans, but suffered through Huigu's subsequent collapse before being welcomed back to the Tang court.

Li Rong (李溶), formally the Prince of An (安王), was an imperial prince of the Chinese Tang dynasty, being a son of Emperor Muzong.

Niu Sengru (牛僧孺), courtesy name Si'an (思黯), formally Duke Wenzhen of Qizhang (奇章文貞公), was Chinese historian, military general, and politician of the Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reigns of Emperor Muzong and his sons Emperor Jingzong and Emperor Wenzong. He was commonly regarded as the leader of one of the two court factions at the time — the faction later known as the Niu Faction — during the Niu-Li Factional Struggles.

The Niu–Li factional strife was an ongoing contention at the court of the mid-to late Tang dynasty. It is largely viewed to have started during the reign of Emperor Muzong, circa 821, but having its seeds in the events of his father Emperor Xianzong—between two court factions later to be referred to by Chinese historians as the Niu Faction (牛黨), named after Niu Sengru, which was largely viewed as a faction of officials from humble origins and who passed the imperial examinations to get into government; and the Li Faction (李黨), named after Li Deyu, which was largely viewed as a faction of officials from aristocratic origins. The two factions struggled for decades at court, during the reigns of Emperor Muzong and his sons Emperor Jingzong, Emperor Wenzong, and Emperor Wuzong. The struggles are viewed as having ended at the start of the reign of Emperor Wuzong's successor and Emperor Muzong's younger brother Emperor Xuānzong, in 846. His clear dislike for Li Deyu, and systematic demotion of related officials, led to the complete defeat of the Li Faction.

Consort Yang, imperial consort rank Xianfei, was an imperial consort of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty. She was a concubine of Emperor Wenzong who became involved in the selection process of his heir and who died as a result of her involvement.

Qiu Shiliang (仇士良), courtesy name Kuangmei (匡美), formally the Duke of Chu (楚公), was an eunuch official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, becoming particularly powerful after the Ganlu Incident — an event in which Emperor Wenzong tried, but failed, to seize power back from powerful eunuchs by slaughtering them.

Li Zongmin (李宗閔), courtesy name Sunzhi (損之), was a Chinese politician of the Tang Dynasty, serving twice as chancellor during the reign of Emperor Wenzong. He was considered one of the leading figures of the Niu-Li Factional Struggles — factional struggles between two factions at the Tang court that lasted decades — as a leader of the so-called Niu Faction, named after his colleague Niu Sengru.

Li Deyu, courtesy name Wenrao (文饒), formally the Duke of Wei (衛公), was a Chinese poet, politician, and writer during the Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reigns of brothers Emperor Wenzong and Emperor Wuzong and (briefly) their uncle Emperor Xuānzong. He was the leader of the so-called Li Faction in the decades-long Niu-Li Factional Struggles, and was particularly powerful during Emperor Wuzong's reign, dominating the court scene and guiding policies during the campaigns against the crumbling Huigu Khanate and against the warlord Liu Zhen. After Emperor Wuzong's death, Emperor Xuānzong, who had long despised him for his hold on power, had him demoted and banished, where he died in exile.

Chen Yixing (陳夷行), courtesy name Zhoudao (周道), was an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving twice as a chancellor during the reigns of Emperor Wenzong and Emperor Wuzong. He was viewed as a Li Faction leader in the Niu-Li Factional Struggles.

Yang Sifu (楊嗣復) (783–848), courtesy name Jizhi (繼之), nickname Qingmen (慶門), formally Count Xiaomu of Hongnong (弘農孝穆伯), was an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reign of Emperor Wenzong and (briefly) the reign of Emperor Wenzong's brother Emperor Wuzong. He was considered one of the leaders of the Niu Faction in the Niu-Li Factional Struggles.

Li Jue, courtesy name Daijia (待價), formally Duke Zhenmu of Zanhuang (贊皇貞穆公), was a Chinese military general and politician during the Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reigns of Emperor Wenzong and (briefly) Emperor Wenzong's brother Emperor Wuzong. He was considered one of the leaders of the Niu Faction in the Niu-Li Factional Struggles.

Consort Wang, imperial consort rank Cairen (王才人), posthumously honored Xianfei (賢妃), was an imperial consort of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty. She was the favorite concubine of Emperor Wuzong.

Wang Zai, né Wang Yanzai (王晏宰), was a general of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, most well known for his participation in Emperor Wuzong's campaign against the warlord Liu Zhen, who ruled Zhaoyi Circuit.

Shi Xiong was a Chinese military general and politician of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, most known for his participation in two campaigns during the reign of Emperor Wuzong — against the remnants of the Huigu Khanate, and against the warlord Liu Zhen, who controlled Zhaoyi Circuit.

Li Sizhong (李思忠), né Ormizt (嗢沒斯), formally the Prince of Huaihua (懷化王), was a general of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty of Huigu ancestry, who submitted to Emperor Wuzong after the collapse of the Huigu Khanate in 840 and subsequently served the Tang imperial government.

Zhang Zhongwu, formally Prince Zhuang of Lanling (蘭陵莊王) or Duke Zhuang of Lanling (蘭陵莊公), was a Chinese military general and politician of the Tang Dynasty who governed Lulong Circuit as its military governor (Jiedushi) in de facto independence from the imperial government, but who followed imperial orders in campaigns against Huigu Khanate remnants, as well as Khitan, Xi, and Shiwei tribes.

Du Cong (杜悰), courtesy name Yongyu (永裕), formally the Duke of Bin (邠公), was an official of the Tang dynasty of China, serving two terms as chancellor during the reigns of Emperor Wuzong and Emperor Wuzong's cousin Emperor Yizong. He was traditionally considered a skilled politician who maintained his high position throughout his lengthy career, but not a capable chancellor.

Li Hui (李回), né Li Chan (李躔), original courtesy name Zhaohui (昭回), later changed to Zhaodu (昭度), formally Duke Wenyi of Longxi (隴西文懿公), was a Chinese politician of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reign of Emperor Wuzong.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Academia Sinica Chinese-Western Calendar Converter. Archived May 22, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Old Book of Tang , vol. 18, part 1.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Zizhi Tongjian , vol. 246.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 248.
  5. Although Emperor Wuzong was listed as Emperor Muzong's fifth son, while receiving edicts of being created princes, his name was listed after Li Cou and Li Rong, who were respectively listed as the sixth and the eighth son of Emperor Muzong; Emperor Wuzong was born in 814, later than Li Rong; When the fellows of Wang Shoucheng falsely accused Li Cou, the rumors they made suggested that Li Cou was the eldest living brother of Wenzong. So Emperor Wuzong was indeed younger than both Li Cou and Li Rong, but as the fifth living son of Emperor Muzong, he was listed as so.
  6. Zizhi Tongjian , vol. 241.
  7. Philip, p.123.
  8. Reischauer, p.242-243.
  9. Buddhism. (2009). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved November 26, 2009, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online Library Edition
  10. John W. Dardess (10 September 2010). Governing China: 150-1850. Hackett Publishing. pp. 31–. ISBN   978-1-60384-447-5.
  11. 1 2 3 Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 247.
  12. Old Book of Tang, vol. 175.

Further reading

Emperor Wuzong of Tang
Born: 2 July 814 Died: 22 April 846
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Emperor of the Tang dynasty
840–846
Succeeded by