Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Encyclopedia of Philosophy, second edition Enc-of-Philosophy-1.jpg
Encyclopedia of Philosophy, second edition

The Encyclopedia of Philosophy is one of the major English encyclopedias of philosophy.

The first edition of the encyclopedia was in eight volumes, edited by Paul Edwards, and published in 1967 by Macmillan; [1] it was reprinted in four volumes in 1972.

A "Supplement" volume, edited by Donald M. Borchert, was added to the reprinted first edition in 1996, containing articles on developments in philosophy since 1967, covering new subjects and scholarship updates or new articles on those written about in the first edition.

A second edition, also edited by Borchert, [2] was published in ten volumes in 2006 by Macmillan Reference USA. Volumes 1–9 contain alphabetically ordered articles. Volume 10 consists of:

Its ISBNs are 0-02-865780-2 as a hardcover set, and 0-02-866072-2 as an e-book.

Currently published by Macmillan Reference USA, which is a part of Gale, a Cengage company. Print Edition is $1693 as of May 2017, eBook price available on request and "depends upon your account type and population served."

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