Endeavour Piedmont Glacier

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Endeavour Piedmont Glacier
Antarctica relief location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Location of Endeavour Piedmont Glacier in Antarctica
Typepiedmont glacier
Location Ross Dependency
Coordinates 77°24′S166°43′E / 77.400°S 166.717°E / -77.400; 166.717
Length6 nmi (11 km; 7 mi)
Width2 nmi (4 km; 2 mi)
Thicknessunknown
Statusunknown

Endeavour Piedmont Glacier is a piedmont glacier, 6 nautical miles (11 km; 7 mi) long and 2 nautical miles (4 km; 2 mi) wide, between the southwest part of Mount Bird and Micou Point, Ross Island. In association with the names of expedition ships grouped on this island, it was named after HMNZS Endeavour, a tanker/supply ship which for at least 10 seasons, 1962–63 to 1971–72, transported bulk petroleum products and cargo to Scott Base and McMurdo Station on Ross Island. [1]

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References

  1. "Endeavour Piedmont Glacier". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2012-03-01.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Endeavour Piedmont Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

Coordinates: 77°24′S166°43′E / 77.400°S 166.717°E / -77.400; 166.717