Enghien

Last updated
Enghien

Edingen  (Dutch)
StadsbeeldEdingen.jpg
Armes de la Maison d'Enghien.png
Coat of arms
Belgium location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Enghien
Location in Belgium
Location of Enghien in Hainaut
Enghien Hainaut Belgium Map.png
Coordinates: 50°42′N04°02′E / 50.700°N 4.033°E / 50.700; 4.033 Coordinates: 50°42′N04°02′E / 50.700°N 4.033°E / 50.700; 4.033
Country Belgium
Community French Community
Region Wallonia
Province Hainaut
Arrondissement Ath
Government
  MayorOlivier Saint-Amand(Ecolo)
  Governing party/ies Ecolo, MR, PS
Population
 (2018-01-01) [1]
  Total13,734
Postal codes
7850
Area codes 02
Website www.enghien-edingen.be

Enghien (Dutch : Edingen, Walloon : Inguî, West Flemish : Enge) is a Walloon municipality located in the Belgian province of Hainaut. On 1 January 2006, Enghien had a total population of 11,980. The total area is 40.59 square kilometres (15.67 sq mi), which gives a population density of 295 inhabitants per km².

Contents

The municipality comprises the city of Enghien, and the towns of Marcq  [ fr ] (Dutch : Mark) and Petit-Enghien (Dutch : Lettelingen). It is situated on the language border in the country, and restricted language rights are granted to the Dutch speaking minority (so-called language facilities).

History

Enghien gave its name to a French duchy and to the commune of Enghien-les-Bains, a suburb of Paris, due to a complex series of family successions: in 1487, Mary of Luxembourg (d. 1547), the only heir of Peter II of Luxembourg (d. 1482), Count of Saint-Pol-sur-Ternoise and member of one of the branches of the House of Luxembourg, married François de Bourbon-Vendôme (d. 1495), the great-grandfather of King Henry IV of France. Mary of Luxembourg brought as her dowry the fief of Condé-en-Brie (Aisne département , France) and the county of Enghien, among others. These fiefs passed to her grandson Louis I de Bourbon, Prince de Condé, uncle of King Henry IV of France, who started the line of the Princes of Condé, the famous cadet branch of the French royal family.

In 1566, the county of Enghien was elevated to a duchy-peerage. However, the necessary registration process was not completed, so the title became extinct at the death of Louis I de Bourbon in 1569. In 1633, Henry II, Prince of Condé, grandson of Louis I de Bourbon, inherited the duchy of Montmorency, near Paris, after the execution of Henri II de Montmorency, brother of his wife Charlotte-Marguerite de Montmorency. In 1689, King Louis XIV allowed Henry III, Prince of Condé, grandson of Henry II, Prince of Condé, to rename the duchy of Montmorency as "duchy of Enghien", in memory of the duchy of Enghien which the Princes of Condé had lost in 1569 at the death of Louis I de Bourbon.

The city of Montmorency, at the heart of the duchy, continued to be known as "Montmorency", despite the official name change, but the name "Enghien" stuck to the nearby lake and marshland that developed later as a spa resort and was incorporated as the commune of Enghien-les-Bains in the 19th century.

See also

Related Research Articles

House of Bourbon European royal house of French origin

The House of Bourbon is a European royal house of French origin, a branch of the Capetian dynasty, the royal House of France. Bourbon kings first ruled France and Navarre in the 16th century. By the 18th century, members of the Spanish Bourbon dynasty held thrones in Spain, Naples, Sicily, and Parma. Spain and Luxembourg currently have monarchs of the House of Bourbon.

Louis, Grand Condé Prince of the Condé branch of the House of Bourbon and French military leader

Louis II de Bourbon, Prince of Condé was a French general and the most famous representative of the Condé branch of the House of Bourbon. Prior to his father's death in 1646, he was styled the Duc d'Enghien. For his military prowess he was known as le Grand Condé.

The Most Serene House of Bourbon-Condé named after Condé-en-Brie, now in the Aisne département, is a French princely house and a cadet branch of the House of Bourbon. The name of the house was derived from the title of Prince of Condé that was originally assumed around 1557 by the French Protestant leader, Louis de Bourbon (1530–1569), uncle of King Henry IV of France, and borne by his male-line descendants.

François-Henri de Montmorency, duc de Luxembourg general

François Henri de Montmorency-Bouteville, Duke of Piney-Luxembourg, called Luxembourg, was a French general, marshal of France, famous as the comrade and successor of the great Condé.

House of Montmorency noble family

Montmorency, pronounced [mɔ̃.mɔ.ʁɑ̃.si], is one of the oldest and most distinguished noble families in France.

Duke of Montmorency

Duke of Montmorency was a title of French nobility that was created several times for members of the Montmorency family, who were lords of Montmorency, near Paris.

Louis Joseph, Prince of Condé Prince of Condé

Louis Joseph de Bourbon was Prince of Condé from 1740 to his death. A member of the House of Bourbon, he held the prestigious rank of Prince du Sang.

The title of Duke of Enghien may, like many noble titles, refer to any of several historical figures.

Enghien-les-Bains Commune in Île-de-France, France

Enghien-les-Bains is a commune in the northern suburbs of Paris, France. It is located 13.5 kilometres (8.4 mi) from the centre of Paris, in the département of Val-d'Oise.

Château de Chantilly castle in Chantilly, France

The Château de Chantilly is an historic French château located in the town of Chantilly, Oise, about 50 kilometres north of Paris. The site comprises two attached buildings: the Petit Château built around 1560 for Anne de Montmorency and the Grand Château, which was destroyed during the French Revolution and rebuilt in the 1870s. It is owned by the Institut de France, to which it was bequeathed in the will of Henri d'Orléans, Duke of Aumale.

Montmorency, Val-dOise Commune in Île-de-France, France

Montmorency is a commune in the northern suburbs of Paris, France. It is located 15.3 km (9.5 mi) from the center of Paris.

Charles, Duke of Vendôme Duke of Vendôme

Charles de Bourbon was a French prince du sang and military commander at the court of Francis I of France. He is notable as the paternal grandfather of King Henry IV of France.

Francis, Count of Vendôme Count of Vendôme

Francis de Bourbon or François de Bourbon, was a French prince du sang. He was the Count of Vendôme.

Louis Auguste, Duke of Maine Duke of Maine

Louis-Auguste de Bourbon, duc du Maine was an illegitimate son of the French king Louis XIV and his official mistress, Madame de Montespan. The king's favourite son, he was the founder of the semi-royal House of Bourbon-Maine named after his title and his surname.

Françoise dAlençon Spouse of Charles, Duke of Vendôme

Françoise d'Alençon was the eldest daughter of René of Alençon and Margaret of Lorraine, and the younger sister and despoiled heiress of Charles IV, Duke of Alençon.

Bourbon-Penthièvre

The House of Bourbon-Penthièvre was an illegitimate branch of the House of Bourbon, thus descending from the Capetian dynasty. It was founded by the duc de Penthièvre (1725–1793), the only child and heir of the comte de Toulouse, the youngest illegitimate son of Louis XIV of France and the marquise de Montespan, and his wife, Marie Victoire de Noailles, the daughter of Anne Jules de Noailles, duc de Noailles.

<i>Prince du sang</i>

A prince du sang is a person legitimately descended in dynastic line from any of a realm's hereditary monarchs. Historically, the term has been used to refer to men and women descended in the male line from a sovereign, although as absolute primogeniture has become more common in monarchies, those with succession rights through female descent are more likely than in the past to be accorded the princely title.

Anne Marie de Bourbon French princess

Anne Marie de Bourbon was the daughter of the Prince of Condé and of a Bavarian princess. As a member of the reigning House of Bourbon, she was a Princesse du Sang. She never married and died of lung disease.

Château de LIsle-Adam

The Château de L'Isle-Adam, now destroyed, could be found in the town of L'Isle-Adam in the department of Val-d'Oise; it was built on an island called the Île du Prieuré The building was connected with many illustrious families; the Lords of Adams, the Dukes of Villiers, the Dukes of Montmorency, the Princes of Condé and finally the Princes of Conti. It was under the Princes of Conti that the building had its golden age. They lived there for seven generations and it was their principal residence outside Paris. Their Parisian home was the Hôtel de Conti. It was entirely destroyed by the 19th century. L'Isle Adam is situated on a series of three isles

References

  1. "Wettelijke Bevolking per gemeente op 1 januari 2018". Statbel. Retrieved 9 March 2019.