Eric Spooner

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Eric Spooner
Eric Sydney Spooner (cropped).jpg
Secretary for Public Works
In office
22 August 1935 21 July 1939
Premier Bertram Stevens
Preceded by Bertram Stevens
Succeeded by Bertram Stevens
Minister for Local Government
In office
15 February 1933 21 July 1939
Premier Bertram Stevens
Preceded by Joseph Jackson
Succeeded by Bertram Stevens
Member of the New South Wales Parliament
for Ryde
In office
11 June 1932 23 August 1940
Preceded by Evan Davies
Succeeded by Arthur Williams
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Robertson
In office
21 September 1940 21 August 1943
Preceded by Sydney Gardner
Succeeded by Thomas Williams
Personal details
Born(1891-03-01)1 March 1891
Waterloo, Colony of New South Wales
Died3 June 1952(1952-06-03) (aged 61)
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Political party United Australia Party
Spouse(s)Mary Berry
Relations Bill Spooner (Brother)
OccupationAccountant

Eric Sydney Spooner (2 March 1891 – 3 June 1952) was an Australian politician.

Contents

Early life

Spooner was born in the Sydney suburb of Waterloo and educated at Christ Church St Laurence School. At 14 he became a telegraph messenger and studied at night at the University of Sydney to gain a diploma in economics and commerce. He married Mary Berry in December 1919. He established the accounting firm of Hungerford, Spooner & Co in 1922 with his brother Bill, a Liberal cabinet minister from 1949 to 1964. [1] [2]

Early political career

Spooner was elected the seat of Ryde in 1932 and became an honorary minister in the United Australia Party government of Bertram Stevens. He subsequently became Assistant Treasurer and Minister for Local Government. From 1935 he was Minister for Local Government, Secretary for Public Works and deputy leader of the United Australia Party (NSW Branch). [3] [4] He was responsible for establishing employment-creating schemes and the Sydney County Council, a gas and electricity supplier. In 1939 he opposed budget cuts and resigned from Cabinet on 21 July. On 1 August, he moved a motion that brought down the government, but he failed to get enough support to form his own government. [1] [5] [6]

Federal politics and later life

In August 1940 Spooner resigned his seat and won the Federal seat of Robertson in the October election. In June 1941, he was appointed Minister for War Organisation of Industry in the third Menzies Ministry, a position he retained until the fall of the Fadden government in October 1941. He lost his seat in the 1943 election. He joined the new Liberal Party, but was almost expelled for questioning the White Australia Policy. He ran unsuccessfully against Prime Minister Ben Chifley in Macquarie in 1946. [1]

Spooner died of cancer in Sydney in 1952, survived by his wife, three sons and daughter. [1]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Lloyd, C. J. (2002). "Spooner, Eric Sydney (1891–1952)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Canberra: Australian National University.
  2. "The Hon. Eric Sydney Spooner (1891–1952)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  3. "DEPUTY LEADER". Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (18, 441). New South Wales, Australia. 20 November 1935. p. 6. Retrieved 8 August 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  4. "MR. SPOONER". The Sydney Morning Herald (30, 540). New South Wales, Australia. 20 November 1935. p. 15. Retrieved 8 August 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  5. "MR. A. MAIR NEW PREMIER". The Sydney Morning Herald (31, 700). New South Wales, Australia. 7 August 1939. p. 11. Retrieved 8 August 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  6. "MR. SPOONER'S ADDRESS". The Sydney Morning Herald (31, 700). New South Wales, Australia. 7 August 1939. p. 12. Retrieved 8 August 2018 via National Library of Australia.

 

New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Evan Davies
Member for Ryde
1932–1940
Succeeded by
Arthur Williams
Political offices
Vacant
Title last held by
Bertram Stevens
Assistant Treasurer
1933 1935
Vacant
Title next held by
Clive Evatt
Preceded by
Joseph Jackson
Minister for Local Government
1933 1939
Succeeded by
Bertram Stevens
Preceded by
Bertram Stevens
Secretary for Public Works
1935 1939
Party political offices
Preceded by
Reginald Weaver
Deputy Leader of the United Australia Party (NSW Branch)
1935 1939
Succeeded by
Athol Richardson
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
Sydney Gardner
Member for Robertson
1940–1943
Succeeded by
Thomas Williams
Political offices
New title Minister for War Organisation of Industry
1941
Succeeded by
John Dedman

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