Erik Møse

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Erik Møse (born 9 October 1950) is a Norwegian judge.

Norway Country in Northern Europe

Norway, officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a Nordic country in Northern Europe whose territory comprises the western and northernmost portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula; the remote island of Jan Mayen and the archipelago of Svalbard are also part of the Kingdom of Norway. The Antarctic Peter I Island and the sub-Antarctic Bouvet Island are dependent territories and thus not considered part of the kingdom. Norway also lays claim to a section of Antarctica known as Queen Maud Land.

He was the President of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) from 2003 to 2007, [1] was the Presiding Judge in Trial Chamber I of the ICTR. [2]

International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda International court established by the United Nations Security Council in Resolution 955

The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda was an international court established in November 1994 by the United Nations Security Council in Resolution 955 in order to judge people responsible for the Rwandan genocide and other serious violations of international law in Rwanda, or by Rwandan citizens in nearby states, between 1 January and 31 December 1994.

He graduated from the University of Oslo and had post-graduate studies in Geneva. Beginning in 1981, he taught at the University of Oslo. He then became a Fellow at the University of Essex in England [1] and subsequently an Honorary Doctor.[ citation needed ] He has published extensively in the field of human rights. Among others, he led the committee that published the Norwegian Official Report 1993:18 on human rights. [3]

University of Oslo Norwegian public research university

The University of Oslo, until 1939 named the Royal Frederick University, is the oldest university in Norway, located in the Norwegian capital of Oslo. Until 1 January 2016 it was the largest Norwegian institution of higher education in terms of size, now surpassed only by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The Academic Ranking of World Universities has ranked it the 58th best university in the world and the third best in the Nordic countries. In 2015, the Times Higher Education World University Rankings ranked it the 135th best university in the world and the seventh best in the Nordics. While in its 2016, Top 200 Rankings of European universities, the Times Higher Education listed the University of Oslo at 63rd, making it the highest ranked Norwegian university.

Geneva Large city in Switzerland

Geneva is the second-most populous city in Switzerland and the most populous city of Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland. Situated where the Rhône exits Lake Geneva, it is the capital of the Republic and Canton of Geneva.

University of Essex university in Essex, United Kingdom

The University of Essex is a public research university in Essex, England. It was established in 1963, welcomed its first students in 1964 and received its royal charter in 1965. Essex's motto, ’Thought the harder, heart the keene’, is adapted from the Anglo-Saxon poem The Battle of Maldon.

Prior to joining ICTR, he was head of department in the Norwegian Ministry of Justice and the Police until 1986; deputy judge, Supreme Court advocate at the Solicitor General's Office from 1986 to 1993; presiding judge at Borgarting Court of Appeal in Oslo from 1993 to 1999. [1]

Borgarting Court of Appeal

Borgarting Court of Appeal is the court of appeal located in Oslo, Norway. It serves the counties of Oslo, Buskerud, Østfold and southern Akershus. The court has 62 judges and 45 administrative staff. The court is administrated by the Norwegian National Courts Administration.

Oslo Capital of Norway

Oslo is the capital and most populous city of Norway. It constitutes both a county and a municipality. Founded in the year 1040 as Ánslo, and established as a kaupstad or trading place in 1048 by Harald Hardrada, the city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V of Norway around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, during the reign of King Christian IV, a new city was built closer to Akershus Fortress and named Christiania in the king's honour. It was established as a municipality (formannskapsdistrikt) on 1 January 1838. The city functioned as a co-official capital during the 1814 to 1905 Union between Sweden and Norway. In 1877, the city's name was respelled Kristiania in accordance with an official spelling reform – a change that was taken over by the municipal authorities only in 1897. In 1925 the city, after incorporating the village retaining its former name, was renamed Oslo.

Møse became Vice President of the ICTR in 1999, [1] then President in 2003, [4] succeeding Navanethem Pillay. Møse was succeeded in 2007 by Dennis Byron. [5] In 2008 he was named as a Supreme Court Justice of Norway. In 2011 he was elected judge at the European Court of Human Rights. He resumed his Supreme Court chair in 2018. [3] [6]

Sir Charles Michael Dennis Byron is a former President of the Caribbean Court of Justice. He also serves as President of the Commonwealth Judicial Education Institute, and is former President of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), and former Chief Justice of the Eastern Caribbean Supreme Court. He was born in Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis.

Supreme Court of Norway supreme court

The Supreme Court of Norway was established in 1815 on the basis of section 88 in the Constitution of the Kingdom of Norway, which prescribes an independent judiciary. It is located in the capital Oslo. In addition to serving as the court of final appeal for civil and criminal cases, it can also rule whether the Cabinet has acted in accordance with Norwegian law and whether the Parliament has passed legislation consistent with the Constitution.

European Court of Human Rights Supranational court in Strasbourg, France, established by the European Convention on Human Rights

The European Court of Human Rights is a supranational or international court established by the European Convention on Human Rights. The court hears applications alleging that a contracting state has breached one or more of the human rights provisions concerning civil and political rights set out in the Convention and its protocols.

Møse is married and has two children, who both attended International School Moshi Arusha Campus and International School Moshi.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Judge Erik Møse". International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). Archived from the original on 16 February 2005. Retrieved 9 January 2010.
  2. "The Chambers". ICTR. Archived from the original on 14 December 2009. Retrieved 9 January 2010.
  3. 1 2 "Erik Møse". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Retrieved 24 April 2013.
  4. "New President and Vice-President for the ICTR". ICTR. 2003-05-26. Archived from the original on 3 September 2005. Retrieved 9 January 2010.
  5. "Judge Byron Elected New President of the ICTR" (Press release). ICTR. 2007-05-21. Retrieved 9 January 2010.[ permanent dead link ]
  6. http://www.echr.coe.int/echr/en/header/the+court/the+court/judges+of+the+court/