Ernest Miller (cinematographer)

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Ernest Miller
Victor McLaglen-Lois Wilson in Laughing at Life.JPG
Victor McLaglen and Lois Wilson in Laughing at Life (1933)
Born(1885-03-07)March 7, 1885
Pasadena, California, US
DiedApril 23, 1957(1957-04-23) (aged 72)
Los Angeles, California, US
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active1921–1956

Ernest Miller (March 7, 1885 – April 23, 1957) was an American cinematographer who was nominated for an Academy Award at the 1939 Oscars for Best Cinematography for the film Army Girl , sharing the nomination with Harry J. Wild. [1] [2] He had nearly 350 film and television credits to his name, mostly Westerns, including some of the early episodes of Gunsmoke . Location work on Army Girl was done primarily at the Iverson Movie Ranch in Chatsworth, Calif., where Miller cut his teeth in B-Westerns and became one of the most prolific—and one of the best—of the site's shooters during the course of his career. His camera work at Iverson became identifiable for Miller's trademark use of the site's charismatic sandstone rock features as framing devices, as he incorporated the giant boulders into the artistry of the outdoor action shots in ways that few cinematographers could match. [3]

Contents

Selected filmography

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References

  1. "The 11th Academy Awards (1939) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-10.
  2. "11th Academy Awards Winners | Oscar Legacy | Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences". Archived from the original on April 2, 2011. Retrieved 2014-03-07.
  3. "Iverson Movie Ranch: The great Iverson cinematographers: Ernest Miller". iversonmovieranch.blogspot.com. 30 September 2010. Retrieved 2014-03-07.