Ernest Palmer (American cinematographer)

Last updated
Ernest Palmer
Ernest S Palmer c1921.jpg
Possible picture of Ernest Palmer, taken around 1921, although the middle initial is wrong
Born
Ernest George Palmer

(1885-12-06)December 6, 1885
DiedFebruary 22, 1978(1978-02-22) (aged 92)
Occupation Hollywood cinematographer
Known for Academy Award for Best Cinematography

Ernest George Palmer (December 6, 1885 - February 22, 1978) was a Hollywood cinematographer for more than 160 films. His earliest known credit was for a 1912 adaptation of Ivanhoe .

Contents

Biography

Palmer was born in Kansas City, Missouri.

In 1941, Palmer won an Oscar for Best Cinematography (in collaboration with Ray Rennahan) for Blood and Sand . [1] Palmer was nominated on several other occasions—in 1928 for Four Devils , in 1929 for Street Angel , and in 1950 for Broken Arrow . He is sometimes confused with a British cinematographer of the same name (1901-1964) who worked on various UK films and television programmes until the early 1960s.

Palmer died in Pacific Palisades, California.

Selected filmography

Related Research Articles

George Barnes (cinematographer) American cinematographer

George S. Barnes, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer active from the era of silent films to the early 1950s.

William Daniels (cinematographer) American cinematographer

William H. Daniels, A.S.C. was a film cinematographer who was Greta Garbo's personal lensman. Early in his career he worked regularly with director Erich von Stroheim.

John F. Seitz American cinematographer and inventor

John Francis Seitz, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer and inventor.

Joseph Ruttenberg American journalist

Joseph Ruttenberg, A.S.C. was a Russian-born American photojournalist and cinematographer.

Lee Garmes American cinematographer

Lee Garmes, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer. During his career, he worked with directors Howard Hawks, Max Ophüls, Josef von Sternberg, Alfred Hitchcock, King Vidor, Nicholas Ray and Henry Hathaway, whom he had met as a young man when the two first came to Hollywood in the silent era. He also co-directed two films with legendary screenwriter Ben Hecht: Angels Over Broadway and Actor's and Sin.

Arthur Edeson American cinematographer

Arthur Edeson, A.S.C. was a film cinematographer, born in New York City. His career ran from the formative years of the film industry in New York, through the silent era in Hollywood, and the sound era there in the 1930s and 1940s. His work included many landmarks in film history, including The Thief of Bagdad (1924), Frankenstein (1931), The Maltese Falcon (1941), and Casablanca (1942).

Arthur Miller (cinematographer) American cinematographer

Arthur Charles Miller, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer. He was nominated for the Oscar for Best Cinematography six times, winning three times: for How Green Was My Valley in 1941, The Song of Bernadette in 1944, and Anna and the King of Siam in 1947.

Charles Schoenbaum American cinmatographer

Charles Edgar Schoenbaum was an American cinematographer whose career began in 1917 and ended with his death in 1951.

Ernest Jacob Haller, sometimes known as Ernie J. Haller, was an American cinematographer.

J. Farrell MacDonald American actor and director

John Farrell MacDonald was an American character actor and director. He played supporting roles and occasional leads. He appeared in over 325 films over a 41-year career from 1911 to 1951, and directed forty-four silent films from 1912 to 1917.

Noble Johnson American actor

Mark Noble, known as Noble Johnson, was an American actor and film producer. He appeared in films such as The Mummy (1932), The Most Dangerous Game (1932), King Kong (1933) and Son of Kong (1933).

Harold Rosson American cinematographer

Harold G. "Hal" Rosson, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer who worked during the early and classical Hollywood cinema, in a career spanning some 52 years, starting from the silent era in 1915. He is best known for his work on the fantasy film The Wizard of Oz (1939) and the musical Singin' in the Rain (1952), as well as his marriage to Jean Harlow.

Phil Rosen American film director

Philip E. Rosen was an American film director and cinematographer. He directed 142 films between 1915 and 1949.

Bert Glennon American film director

Bert Lawrence Glennon was an American cinematographer and film director. He directed Syncopation (1929), the first film released by RKO Radio Pictures.

Margarete Kupfer German actress

Margarete Kupfer was a German actress.

Curt Courant German cinematographer

Curt Courant was a German cinematographer who worked on over a hundred films during the silent and early sound eras. Courant worked in several European countries, collaborating with figures such as Alfred Hitchcock and Fritz Lang. As he was of Jewish ancestry, Courant was forced to leave Germany in 1933 and go into exile following the Nazi takeover of power. Courant worked at several of the leading British studios during the mid-1930s. He is the father of Willy Kurant who also became a cinematographer.

Robert Herlth was a German art director. He was one of the leading designers of German film sets during the 1920s and 1930s.

Oliver T. Marsh was a prolific Hollywood cinematographer. He worked on over eighty films just for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer alone.

Allen G. Siegler was an American cinematographer who lensed nearly 200 films and television episodes between 1914 and 1952. He worked at Columbia Pictures for many years, and was an early member of the American Society of Cinematographers.

L. William O'Connell was an American cinematographer who worked in Hollywood for decades, beginning during the silent era. He frequently worked with directors Howard Hawks and William K. Howard.

References

  1. "The 14th Academy Awards (1942) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved June 17, 2019.