Ernst Lehrs

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Ernst Lehrs (30 July 1894 in Berlin 31 December 1979 in Eckwälden, West Germany) was a German anthroposophist, Waldorf teacher, lecturer and writer. [1] [2]

Berlin Capital of Germany

Berlin is the capital and largest city of Germany by both area and population. Its 3,748,148 (2018) inhabitants make it the second most populous city proper of the European Union after London. The city is one of Germany's 16 federal states. It is surrounded by the state of Brandenburg, and contiguous with Potsdam, Brandenburg's capital. The two cities are at the center of the Berlin-Brandenburg capital region, which is, with about six million inhabitants and an area of more than 30,000 km², Germany's third-largest metropolitan region after the Rhine-Ruhr and Rhine-Main regions.

Anthroposophy philosophy founded by Rudolf Steiner

Anthroposophy is a philosophy founded in the early 20th-century by esotericist Rudolf Steiner that postulates the existence of an objective, intellectually comprehensible spiritual world, accessible to human experience. Followers of anthroposophy aim to develop mental faculties of spiritual discovery through a mode of thought independent of sensory experience. They also aim to present their ideas in a manner verifiable by rational discourse and specifically seek a precision and clarity in studying the spiritual world mirroring that obtained by natural historians in investigations of the physical world.

Contents

Life

Ernst Lehrs was born to assimilated JewishProtestant parents in Berlin. He volunteered for service at the beginning of World War I. After the war he studied natural sciences, completing his PhD in 1923.

World War I 1914–1918 global war starting in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the resulting 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Natural science Branch of science about the natural world

Natural science is a branch of science concerned with the description, prediction, and understanding of natural phenomena, based on empirical evidence from observation and experimentation. Mechanisms such as peer review and repeatability of findings are used to try to ensure the validity of scientific advances.

Together with a number of his student friends, he discovered Anthroposophy in 1920 and had numerous personal meetings with Rudolf Steiner. The thoughts and ideas of these young people were welcomed by Rudolf Steiner and he entered fully into their wishes and striving. [3] In this manner he learned to connect his past training in the natural sciences with the manner of thinking and investigation of Goethe, which determined the future direction of his research. Together with Wilhelm Rath he contributed significantly to the organisation of the youth conference in which Rudolf Steiner held the lecture cycle "The Younger Generation" and which led to the founding of an Esoteric Youth Circle. [4] He describes this in his autobiography "Gelebte Erwartung".

Rudolf Steiner Austrian philosopher, social reformer, architect, economist and esotericist

Rudolf Joseph Lorenz Steiner was an Austrian clairvoyant, philosopher, social reformer, architect, economist and esotericist. Steiner gained initial recognition at the end of the nineteenth century as a literary critic and published philosophical works including The Philosophy of Freedom. At the beginning of the twentieth century he founded an esoteric spiritual movement, anthroposophy, with roots in German idealist philosophy and theosophy; other influences include Goethean science and Rosicrucianism.

Wilhelm Rath was a German writer, translator, bio-dynamic farmer and anthroposophist. He is best known for his research and translations of certain medieval mystics, notably the Friend of God from the Oberland, Bernard Silvestris, Alanus ab Insulis and John of Hildesheim.

After completing his studies he became senior teacher at the first Waldorf School in Stuttgart, beginning on a career as educator first of children and later in adult education. With the rise of National Socialism in Germany, he emigrated to the Netherlands in 1935, where he taught in a Waldorf school and then later to Britain. During a short period of internment he met Karl König in 1940, beginning a long relationship between the two. His best known work, Man or Matter, was first published in England.

Stuttgart Place in Baden-Württemberg, Germany

Stuttgart is the capital and largest city of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. Stuttgart is located on the Neckar river in a fertile valley known locally as the "Stuttgart Cauldron". It lies an hour from the Swabian Jura and the Black Forest. Its urban area has a population of 634,830, making it the sixth largest city in Germany. 2.8 million people live in the city's administrative region and 5.3 million people in its metropolitan area, making it the fourth largest metropolitan area in Germany. The city and metropolitan area are consistently ranked among the top 20 European metropolitan areas by GDP; Mercer listed Stuttgart as 21st on its 2015 list of cities by quality of living, innovation agency 2thinknow ranked the city 24th globally out of 442 cities and the Globalization and World Cities Research Network ranked the city as a Beta-status world city in their 2014 survey.

Netherlands Constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Europe

The Netherlands is a country located in Northwestern Europe with some overseas territories. In Europe, it consists of 12 provinces that border Germany to the east, Belgium to the south, and the North Sea to the northwest, with maritime borders in the North Sea with those countries and the United Kingdom. Together with three island territories in the Caribbean Sea—Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba—it forms a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The official language is Dutch, but a secondary official language in the province of Friesland is West Frisian.

Karl König was an Austrian paediatrician who founded the Camphill Movement, an international movement of therapeutic intentional communities for those with special needs or disabilities.

Close ties of friendship connected him with the philosopher and close co-worker of Rudolf Steiner, Maria Röschl, who had been delegated with the task of founding the Youth Section at the Goetheanum. In 1939, they were married in England, pursuing a common commitment to young people and their possibilities of finding meaningful principles in life in our materialistic technological society. In 1952 the couple returned to Germany, where he worked as lecturer at the Seminar for Curative Education in Eckwälden until his death in 1979.

Goetheanum world center for the anthroposophical movement, including performance halls, in Dornach, Switzerland

The Goetheanum, located in Dornach, in the canton of Solothurn, Switzerland, is the world center for the anthroposophical movement.

Works

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Joachim Jungius German scholar of the XVIIth century

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References

  1. Biographischer Eintrag in der Online-Dokumentation der anthroposophischen Forschungsstelle Kulturimpuls
  2. Gelebte Erwartung. Mellinger, Stuttgart 1979, ISBN   3-88069-088-X
  3. Christiane Haid: Auf der Suche nach dem Menschen: Die anthroposophische Jugend- und Studentenarbeit in den Jahren 1920 bis 1931 mit einem skizzenhaften Ausblick bis in die Gegenwart - Verlag am Goetheanum 2001 ISBN   978-3723511107
  4. Rudolf Steiner, Esoteric Lessons 1913-1923: From the Esoteric School, Vol. 3 Steiner Books (1 October 2011) ISBN   978-0880106184 pp. 362