Erzincan Province

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Erzincan Province

Erzincan ili
Erzincan in Turkey.svg
Location of Erzincan Province in Turkey
Country Turkey
Region Northeast Anatolia
Subregion Erzurum
Government
   Electoral district Erzincan
  GovernorMehmet Makas
Area
  Total11,974 km2 (4,623 sq mi)
Population
 (2018) [1]
  Total236,034
  Density20/km2 (51/sq mi)
   Urban
114,437
Area code(s) 0446
Vehicle registration 24

Erzincan Province (Turkish : Erzincan ili, Kurdish : Parezgêha Erzînganê [2] ) is a province in the Eastern Anatolia Region of Turkey. In Turkey, its capital is also called Erzincan. The population was 224,949 in 2010.

Contents

Geography

Erzincan is traversed by the northeasterly line of equal latitude and longitude. It lies on the Northern Anatolian Fault, why it is often the location for earthquakes like one in 27 December 1939 [3] and the earthquake on the 13 March 1992. [4]

Districts

Districts of Erzincan Erzincan districts.png
Districts of Erzincan

Erzincan province is divided into 9 districts (capital district in bold):

History

In September 1935 the third Inspectorate General (Umumi Müfettişlik, UM) was created, [5] into which the Erzincan province was included. Its creation was based on the Law 1164 from June 1927, [5] which was passed in order to Turkefy the population. [6] The Erzincan province was included in this area. The third UM span over the provinces of Erzurum, Artvin, Rize, Trabzon, Kars, Gümüşhane, Erzincan and Ağrı. It was governed by an Inspector General seated in the city of Erzurum. [5] [7] In January 1936, a Fourth Inspectorate-General was established, [8] under which authority the province was transferred. The fourth UM included the provinces of Erzincan, Tunceli, Elazığ and the areas which would become the province of Bingöl. [7] The Fourth UM was governed by a Governor Commander. Most of the employees in the municipalities were to be from the military and the Governor Commander had the authority to evacuate whole villages and resettle them in other areas. [7] The Inspectorates General were dissolved in 1952 during the Government of the Democrat Party. [9]

See also

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References

  1. "Population of provinces by years - 2000-2018". Turkish Statistical Institute. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  2. "Li Wan û Erzînganê ji ber berfê rêyên 144 tax û gundan hatin girtin" (in Kurdish). Rûdaw. 3 December 2019. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  3. Rosie Ayliffe, Marc Dubin, John Gawthrop, Terry Richardson, Turkey, 1136 pp., Rough Guides, 2003, ISBN   1-84353-071-6, ISBN   978-1-84353-071-8 (see p.1016)
  4. Grosser, H.; Baumbach, M.; Berckhemer, H.; Baier, B.; Karahan, A.; Schelle, H.; Krüger, F.; Paulat, A.; Michel, G.; Demirtas, R.; Gencoglu, S. (1998-10-01). [The Erzincan (Turkey) Earthquake of 13 March 1992 and its Aftershock Sequence "The Erzincan (Turkey) Earthquake of 13 March 1992 and its Aftershock Sequence"] Check |url= value (help). Pure and Applied Geophysics. 152 (3): 465–505. doi:10.1007/s000240050163. ISSN   0033-4553. S2CID   129640525.
  5. 1 2 3 "Üçüncü Umumi Müfettişliği'nin Kurulması ve III. Umumî Müfettiş Tahsin Uzer'in Bazı Önemli Faaliyetleri". Dergipark. p. 2. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  6. Üngör, Umut. "Young Turk social engineering : mass violence and the nation state in eastern Turkey, 1913- 1950" (PDF). University of Amsterdam. pp. 244–247. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  7. 1 2 3 Bayir, Derya (2016-04-22). Minorities and Nationalism in Turkish Law. Routledge. pp. 139–141. ISBN   978-1-317-09579-8.
  8. Cagaptay, Soner (2 May 2006). Islam, Secularism and Nationalism in Modern Turkey: Who is a Turk?. Routledge. pp. 108–110. ISBN   978-1-134-17448-5.
  9. Fleet, Kate; Kunt, I. Metin; Kasaba, Reşat; Faroqhi, Suraiya (2008-04-17). The Cambridge History of Turkey. Cambridge University Press. p. 343. ISBN   978-0-521-62096-3.

Coordinates: 39°40′42″N39°19′48″E / 39.67833°N 39.33000°E / 39.67833; 39.33000