Ethiopian Lictor Youth

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Ethiopian Lictor Youth (Italian : Gioventù Etiopica del Littorio, abbreviated G.E.L.) was a fascist youth organization in Ethiopia.

Italian language Romance language

Italian is a Romance language of the Indo-European language family. Italian, together with Sardinian, is by most measures the closest language to Vulgar Latin of the Romance languages. Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino and Vatican City. It has an official minority status in western Istria. It formerly had official status in Albania, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro (Kotor) and Greece, and is generally understood in Corsica and Savoie. It also used to be an official language in the former Italian East Africa and Italian North Africa, where it plays a significant role in various sectors. Italian is also spoken by large expatriate communities in the Americas and Australia. In spite of not existing any Italian community in their respective national territories and of not being spoken at any level, Italian is included de jure, but not de facto, between the recognized minority languages of Bosnia-Herzegovina and Romania. Many speakers of Italian are native bilinguals of both standardized Italian and other regional languages.

Ethiopia country in East Africa

Ethiopia, officially the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, is a country in the northeastern part of Africa, popularly known as the Horn of Africa. It shares borders with Eritrea to the north, Djibouti to the northeast, and Somalia to the east, Sudan and South Sudan to the west, and Kenya to the south. With over 102 million inhabitants, Ethiopia is the most populous landlocked country in the world and the second-most populous nation on the African continent that covers a total area of 1,100,000 square kilometres (420,000 sq mi). Its capital and largest city is Addis Ababa, which lies a few miles west of the East African Rift that splits the country into the Nubian Plate and the Somali Plate.

History

Soon after the Italian conquest of Ethiopia, thousands of school-children were organized in GEL. Through GEL a free lunch programme for children was set up. GEL had its own uniforms. [1] GEL was founded in 1936 and modelled after the Gioventù Italiana del Littorio (the youth wing of the National Fascist Party) and the Arab Lictor Youth in Libya. [2] [3] However, GEL (later renamed 'Indigenous Lictor Youth', Gioventù Indigena del Littorio in 1940, after the introduction of racial segregation laws in July 1938) was never incorporated as such into the Italian mother organization. [4]

Gioventù Italiana del Littorio organization

The Gioventù Italiana del Littorio(GIL) was the consolidated youth movement of the National Fascist Party of Italy that was established in 1937, to replace the Opera Nazionale Balilla (ONB). It was created to supervise and influence the minds of all youths, that was effectively directed against the influence of the Catholic Church on youths.

National Fascist Party Italian political party, created by Benito Mussolini as the political expression of fascism

The National Fascist Party was an Italian political party, created by Benito Mussolini as the political expression of fascism. The party ruled Italy from 1922 when Fascists took power with the March on Rome to 1943, when Mussolini was deposed by the Grand Council of Fascism.

Arab Lictor Youth

Arab Lictor Youth was a fascist youth organization for Arab youth in Italian Libya.

On May 24, 1937 a contingent of GEL paraded through Rome in connection with the twentieth anniversary of the Italian entry into the First World War. The GEL unit sang a specially composed song in honour of Il Duce , Benito Mussolini. [3]

Rome Capital city and comune in Italy

Rome is the capital city and a special comune of Italy. Rome also serves as the capital of the Lazio region. With 2,872,800 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi), it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4,355,725 residents, thus making it the most populous metropolitan city in Italy. Rome is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber. The Vatican City is an independent country inside the city boundaries of Rome, the only existing example of a country within a city: for this reason Rome has been often defined as capital of two states.

Benito Mussolini Duce and President of the Council of Ministers of Italy. Leader of the National Fascist Party and subsequent Republican Fascist Party

Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini was an Italian politician and journalist who was the leader of the National Fascist Party. He ruled Italy as Prime Minister from 1922 to 1943; he constitutionally led the country until 1925, when he dropped the pretense of democracy and established a dictatorship.

The organization was disbanded on orders from Rome after a brief existence. [5]

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References

  1. Zoli, Corrado. The Organization of Italy's East African Empire , in Foreign Affairs vol 16 (1937-1938).
  2. http://www.centroginocchi.it/index.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=14&Itemid=18%5B%5D
  3. 1 2 Pankhurst, Richard. Education in Ethiopia during the Italian Fascist Occupation (1936-1941) , in The International Journal of African Historical Studies, Vol. 5, No. 3 (1972), pp. 361- 396
  4. Mannucci, Stefano. La fotografia strumento dell’imperialismo fascista
  5. Diel, Louise, and Kenneth Kirkness. "Behold Our New Empire"--Mussolini . London: Hurst & Blackett, 1939. p. 37