Eugène Boudin

Last updated
Eugène Boudin
Boudin.jpeg
Eugène Boudin, c. 1890s
Born
Eugène Louis Boudin

(1824-07-12)12 July 1824
Died8 August 1898(1898-08-08) (aged 74)
NationalityFrench
Known forPainting
Movement Impressionism

Eugène Louis Boudin (French:  [budɛ̃] ; 12 July 1824 8 August 1898) was one of the first French landscape painters to paint outdoors. Boudin was a marine painter, and expert in the rendering of all that goes upon the sea and along its shores. His pastels, summary and economic, garnered the splendid eulogy of Baudelaire; and Corot called him the "king of the skies". [1]

France Republic with mainland in Europe and numerous oversea territories

France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) and a total population of 67.3 million. France, a sovereign state, is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

Marine art form of figurative art that portrays or draws its main inspiration from the sea

Marine art or maritime art is any form of figurative art that portrays or draws its main inspiration from the sea. Maritime painting is a genre that depicts ships and the sea—a genre particularly strong from the 17th to 19th centuries. In practice the term often covers art showing shipping on rivers and estuaries, beach scenes and all art showing boats, without any rigid distinction - for practical reasons subjects that can be drawn or painted from dry land in fact feature strongly in the genre. Strictly speaking "maritime art" should always include some element of human seafaring, whereas "marine art" would also include pure seascapes with no human element, though this distinction may not be observed in practice.

Pastel art medium

A pastel is an art medium in the form of a stick, consisting of pure powdered pigment and a binder. The pigments used in pastels are the same as those used to produce all colored art media, including oil paints; the binder is of a neutral hue and low saturation. The color effect of pastels is closer to the natural dry pigments than that of any other process.

Contents

Biography

Fair in Brittany, one of Boudin's "Brittany" paintings (1874), Corcoran Gallery of Art Fair in Brittany by Eugene Boudin, 1874 - Corcoran Gallery of Art - DSC01352.JPG
Fair in Brittany, one of Boudin's "Brittany" paintings (1874), Corcoran Gallery of Art
Le Havre, The Port (1884), Brooklyn Museum Le Havre, The Port Eugene Louis Boudin 1884.jpg
Le Havre, The Port (1884), Brooklyn Museum

Born at Honfleur, Boudin was the son of a harbor pilot, and at age 10 the young boy worked on a steamboat that ran between Le Havre and Honfleur. In 1835 the family moved to Le Havre, where Boudin's father opened a store for stationery and picture frames. Here the young Eugene worked, later opening his own small shop. Boudin's father had thus abandoned seafaring, and his son gave it up too, having no real vocation for it, though he preserved to his last days much of a sailor's character: frankness, accessibility, and open-heartedness.

Honfleur Commune in Normandy, France

Not to be confused with nearby Harfleur.

Le Havre Subprefecture and commune in Normandy, France

Le Havre, is an urban French commune and city in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region of northwestern France. It is situated on the right bank of the estuary of the river Seine on the Channel southwest of the Pays de Caux.

In his shop, in which pictures were framed, Boudin came into contact with artists working in the area and exhibited in the shop the paintings of Constant Troyon and Jean-François Millet, who, along with Jean-Baptiste Isabey and Thomas Couture whom he met during this time, encouraged young Boudin to follow an artistic career. At the age of 22 he abandoned the world of commerce, started painting full-time, and traveled to Paris the following year and then through Flanders. In 1850 he earned a scholarship that enabled him to move to Paris, although he often returned to paint in Normandy and, from 1855, made regular trips to Brittany.

Constant Troyon French painter

Constant Troyon was a French painter of the Barbizon school. In the early part of his career he painted mostly landscapes. It was only comparatively late in life that Troyon found his métier as a painter of animals, and achieved international recognition.

Jean-François Millet 19th-century French painter

Jean-François Millet was a French painter and one of the founders of the Barbizon school in rural France. Millet is noted for his scenes of peasant farmers; he can be categorized as part of the Realism art movement.

Jean-Baptiste Isabey French painter

Jean-Baptiste Isabey was a French painter born at Nancy.

Sailboats at Trouville (1884), Yale University Art Gallery, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon. Voiliers devant Trouville by Eugene Louis Boudin.jpeg
Sailboats at Trouville (1884), Yale University Art Gallery, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon.

Dutch 17th-century masters profoundly influenced him, and on meeting the Dutch painter Johan Jongkind, who had already made his mark in French artistic circles, Boudin was advised by his new friend to paint outdoors ( en plein air ). He also worked with Troyon and Isabey, and in 1859 met Gustave Courbet who introduced him to Charles Baudelaire, the first critic to draw Boudin’s talents to public attention when the artist made his debut at the 1859 Paris Salon.

Johan Jongkind Dutch painter and printmaker regarded as a forerunner of Impressionism

Johan Barthold Jongkind was a Dutch painter and printmaker. He painted marine landscapes in a free manner and is regarded as a forerunner of Impressionism.

<i>En plein air</i> act of painting outdoors

En plein air is the act of painting outdoors. This method contrasts with studio painting or academic rules that might create a predetermined look.

Gustave Courbet 19th-century French painter

Jean Désiré Gustave Courbet was a French painter who led the Realism movement in 19th-century French painting. Committed to painting only what he could see, he rejected academic convention and the Romanticism of the previous generation of visual artists. His independence set an example that was important to later artists, such as the Impressionists and the Cubists. Courbet occupies an important place in 19th-century French painting as an innovator and as an artist willing to make bold social statements through his work.

In 1857/58 Boudin befriended the young Claude Monet, then only 18, and persuaded him to give up his teenage caricature drawings and to become a landscape painter, helping to instill in him a love of bright hues and the play of light on water later evident in Monet's Impressionist paintings. The two remained lifelong friends and Monet later paid tribute to Boudin’s early influence. Boudin joined Monet and his young friends in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1873, but never considered himself a radical or innovator.

Claude Monet French painter

Oscar-Claude Monet was a French painter, a founder of French Impressionist painting and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement's philosophy of expressing one's perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein air landscape painting. The term "Impressionism" is derived from the title of his painting Impression, soleil levant, which was exhibited in 1874 in the first of the independent exhibitions mounted by Monet and his associates as an alternative to the Salon de Paris.

Venice-Seascape at the Giudecca (1895), Princeton University Art Museum Boudin, Eugene, Venice-Seascape at the Giudecca, 1895.jpg
Venice-Seascape at the Giudecca (1895), Princeton University Art Museum

Boudin’s growing reputation enabled him to travel extensively in the 1870s. He visited Belgium, the Netherlands and southern France, and from 1892 to 1895 made regular trips to Venice. He continued to exhibit at the Paris Salons, receiving a third place medal at the Paris Salon of 1881, and a gold medal at the 1889 Exposition Universelle. In 1892 Boudin was made a knight of the Légion d'honneur, a somewhat tardy recognition of his talents and influence on the art of his contemporaries.

Late in his life he returned to the south of France as a refuge from ill-health, and recognizing soon that the relief it could give him was almost spent, he returned to his home at Deauville, to die within sight of Channel waters and under the Channel skies he had painted so often.

Awards

The Eugène Boudin Prize is an award given by the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts. Among the laureates of this award, the following painters were nominated:

Related Research Articles

Musée dOrsay Art museum, Design/Textile Museum, Historic site in Rue de Lille Paris, France

The Musée d'Orsay is a museum in Paris, France, on the Left Bank of the Seine. It is housed in the former Gare d'Orsay, a Beaux-Arts railway station built between 1898 and 1900. The museum holds mainly French art dating from 1848 to 1914, including paintings, sculptures, furniture, and photography. It houses the largest collection of impressionist and post-Impressionist masterpieces in the world, by painters including Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin, and Van Gogh. Many of these works were held at the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume prior to the museum's opening in 1986. It is one of the largest art museums in Europe. Musée d'Orsay had 3.177 million visitors in 2017.

Barbizon school art movement towards Realism

The Barbizon school of painters were part of an art movement towards Realism in art, which arose in the context of the dominant Romantic Movement of the time. The Barbizon school was active roughly from 1830 through 1870. It takes its name from the village of Barbizon, France, near the Forest of Fontainebleau, where many of the artists gathered. Some of the most prominent features of this school are its tonal qualities, color, loose brushwork, and softness of form.

<i>Impression, Sunrise</i> painting by Claude Monet, 1872

Impression, Sunrise is a painting by Claude Monet first shown at what would become known as the "Exhibition of the Impressionists" in Paris in April, 1874. The painting is credited with inspiring the name of the Impressionist movement.

Gare Saint-Lazare train station in Paris, France

The Gare Saint-Lazare, officially Paris-Saint-Lazare, is one of the six large terminus railway stations of Paris. It serves train services toward Normandy, northwest of Paris, along the Paris–Le Havre railway. Saint-Lazare is the second busiest station in Paris, after the Gare du Nord. It handles 275,000 passengers each day. The station was designed by architect Juste Lisch, and the maître de l'oeuvre was Eugene Flachat.

Raoul Dufy French artist

Raoul Dufy was a French Fauvist painter, brother of Jean Dufy. He developed a colorful, decorative style that became fashionable for designs of ceramics and textiles, as well as decorative schemes for public buildings. He is noted for scenes of open-air social events. He was also a draftsman, printmaker, book illustrator, scenic designer, a designer of furniture, and a planner of public spaces.

Charles Cottet French painter (1863-1925)

Charles Cottet (1863–1925), French painter, was born at Le Puy-en-Velay and died in Paris. A famed post-impressionist, Cottet is known for his dark, evocative painting of rural Brittany and seascapes. He led a school of painters known as the Bande noire or 'Nubians' group, and was friends with such artists as Auguste Rodin.

Eugène Isabey French painter

Eugène Louis Gabriel Isabey was a French painter, lithographer and watercolorist in the Romantic style.

Jules Achille Noël French painter

Jules Achille Noël, born Louis Assez Noël was a French landscape and maritime painter who worked primarily in Brittany and Normandy.

Jean Achard painter

Jean Alexis Achard (1807–1884) was a French painter.

Adolphe-Félix Cals French painter

Adolphe-Félix Cals was a French portrait, genre, and landscape painter.

Museum of modern art André Malraux - MuMa museum in Le Havre, France

The Musée d'art moderne André Malraux is a museum in Le Havre, France containing one of the nation's most extensive collections of impressionist paintings. It was designed by Atelier LWD, an architecture studio led by Guy Lagneau, Michel Weill and Jean Dimitrijevic. It is named after André Malraux, Minister of Culture when the museum was opened in 1961.

<i>The Magpie</i> (Monet) painting by Claude Monet

The Magpie is an oil-on-canvas landscape painting by the French Impressionist Claude Monet, created during the winter of 1868–1869 near the commune of Étretat in Normandy. Monet's patron, Louis Joachim Gaudibert, helped arrange a house in Étretat for Monet's fiancée Camille Doncieux and their newborn son, allowing Monet to paint in relative comfort, surrounded by his family.

The artist André Hambourg was a French painter of romantic compositions of Venice, luminous seascapes, and beach scenes.

Albert Lebourg French impressionist painter - the image "Moret sur loing un matin de fevrier, ca.1900" attributed to Lebourg is actually by Alfred Sisley

Albert Lebourg, birth name Albert-Marie Lebourg, also called Albert-Charles Lebourg and Charles Albert Lebourg, was a French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist landscape painter of the Rouen School. Member of the Société des Artistes Français, he actively worked in a luminous Impressionist style, creating more than 2,000 landscapes during his lifetime. The artist was represented by Galerie Mancini in Paris in 1896, in 1899 and 1910 by : Galerie Bernheim-Jeune, 1903 and 1906 at the Galerie Paul Rosenberg, and 1918 and 1923 at Galerie Georges Petit.

Jean Dries French painter

Jean Dries is the name used by the artist, Jean Driesbach, who was born on October 19, 1905 in Bar-Le-Duc in Meuse, France and died in Paris on February 26, 1973. He was a Lorrain painter by birth and was born the year Fauvism appeared at the Salon d'automne. He became a Parisian painter when he studied under Lucien Simon at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, through his adventures in the "zone", setting up several studios before finally settling in the Île Saint-Louis at 15 quai d'Anjou.

Henri Michel-Lévy French painter (1844-1914)

Henri Michel-Lévy, was a French impressionist painter.

Xavier Leprince French painter

Auguste-Xavier Leprince was a French painter, drawer and engraver, best known for his paintings of agrarian scenes.

Joseph Édouard Stevens was a Belgian animalier painter and engraver.

References

Notes

  1. Sterling, Charles and Salinger, Margaretta, French Paintings: A Catalogue of the Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. XIX-XX Centuries, Volume 3, New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1967, p. 134.