Eurovision Song Contest 1989

Last updated
Eurovision Song Contest 1989
ESC 1989 logo.png
Dates
Final6 May 1989
Host
Venue Palais de Beaulieu
Lausanne, Switzerland
Presenter(s)
Musical directorBenoit Kaufman
Directed byAlain Bloch
Executive supervisorFrank Naef
Executive producerRaymond Zumsteg
Host broadcaster Swiss Broadcasting Corporation (SRG SSR)
Website eurovision.tv/event/lausanne-1989 OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
Participants
Number of entries22
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countriesFlag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus
Non-returning countriesNone
  • ESC 1989 Map.svg
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1989
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8–1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul pointsFlag of Iceland.svg  Iceland
Winning songFlag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia
"Rock Me"
1988  Eurovision Song Contest  1990

The Eurovision Song Contest 1989 was the 34th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, following Céline Dion's victory at the 1988 contest with the song "Ne partez pas sans moi". Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Swiss Broadcasting Corporation (SRG SSR), the contest was held at Palais de Beaulieu on 6 May 1989 and was hosted by Swiss model Lolita Morena and journalist Jacques Deschenaux.

Contents

Twenty-two countries took part in the contest with Cyprus returning after having been disqualified the year before.

The winner was Yugoslavia with the song "Rock Me" by Croatian band Riva. This was the only victory for Yugoslavia as a unified state. [1] As of 2022 they are still the last act to win the contest performing last.

Location

Palais de Beaulieu, Lausanne - host venue of the 1989 contest. Lausanne-Beaulieu-Negative0-34-32A(1).jpg
Palais de Beaulieu, Lausanne – host venue of the 1989 contest.

Lausanne is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, and the capital and biggest city of the canton of Vaud. The city is situated on the shores of Lake Geneva (French : Lac Léman, or simply Le Léman). [2] It faces the French town of Évian-les-Bains, with the Jura Mountains to its north-west. Lausanne is located 62 kilometres (38.5 miles) northeast of Geneva.

Palais de Beaulieu, a convention and exhibition centre, was chosen to host the 1989 contest. The centre includes the 1,844 seat Théâtre de Beaulieu concert, dance and theatre hall. Inaugurated in 1954, the Théâtre de Beaulieu is the biggest theatre in Switzerland. The Eurovision Song Contest took place in the Hall 6 + 7 of the Palais, to the right from the main hall and the theatre.

Contest overview

The United Kingdom's Ray Caruana, lead singer of Live Report was outspoken about coming second to what he considered a much less worthy song. [3] They had been defeated by 7 points.

Two of the performers, Nathalie Pâque and Gili Natanael were respectively 11 and 12 years old at their time of competing. Due to bad publicity surrounding their participation, the European Broadcasting Union introduced a rule stating that no performer would be allowed to take part before the year of their 16th birthday. This rule remains in place to the present day. [4]

The previous year's winner, Céline Dion, opened the show with a mimed performance of her winning song and a mimed performance of her first English-language single, "Where Does My Heart Beat Now". The song became a top ten hit in the US a year later - effectively launching her into international success. [1]

Participating countries

Conductors

Each performance (except Austria, Iceland and Germany) had a conductor who led the orchestra. [5] [6] Unlike in most years and like in 1988, the conductors took their bows after each song, not before.

Returning artists

ArtistCountryPrevious year(s)
Marianna Efstratiou Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 1987 (as a backing vocalist for Bang)
Søren Bundgaard (Backing vocal)Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1984, 1985, 1988 (as a part of Hot Eyes)

Participants and results

R/OCountryArtistSongLanguage [7] [8] PointsPlace [9]
1Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Anna Oxa and Fausto Leali "Avrei voluto" Italian 569
2Flag of Israel.svg  Israel Gili and Galit"Derekh Hamelekh" (דרך המלך) Hebrew 5012
3Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland Kiev Connolly and the Missing Passengers"The Real Me" English 2118
4Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Justine Pelmelay "Blijf zoals je bent" Dutch 4515
5Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey Pan"Bana Bana" Turkish 521
6Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Ingeborg "Door de wind"Dutch1319
7Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom Live Report "Why Do I Always Get It Wrong"English1302
8Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Britt Synnøve Johansen "Venners nærhet" Norwegian 3017
9Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal Da Vinci "Conquistador" Portuguese 3916
10Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Tommy Nilsson "En dag" Swedish 1104
11Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg Park Café "Monsieur" French 820
12Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Birthe Kjær " Vi maler byen rød " Danish 1113
13Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Thomas Forstner "Nur ein Lied" German 975
14Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Anneli Saaristo "La dolce vita" Finnish 767
15Flag of France.svg  France Nathalie Pâque "J'ai volé la vie"French608
16Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Nina "Nacida para amar" Spanish 886
17Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus Fani Polymeri and Yiannis Savvidakis"Apopse as vrethoume" (Απόψε ας βρεθούμε) Greek 5111
18Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg  Switzerland Furbaz "Viver senza tei" Romansh 4713
19Flag of Greece.svg  Greece Marianna "To diko sou asteri" (Το δικό σου αστέρι)Greek569
20Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Daníel Ágúst Haraldsson "Það sem enginn sér" Icelandic 022
21Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Nino de Angelo "Flieger"German4614
22Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Riva "Rock Me" Serbo-Croatian 1371

Detailed voting results

Each country had a jury who awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 point(s) for their top ten songs. There was also a change of rule in case of a tie; prior to 1989, both countries would perform their songs again until a final decision was made. However from 1989 onwards, if there was a tie at the end of the voting, the country that scored the most twelves would be declared the winner. If there was still a tie, the winner was the country that scored the most tens. And if there still was a tie after that, both countries would be declared joint winners.

Detailed voting results [10] [11]
Total score
Italy
Israel
Ireland
Netherlands
Turkey
Belgium
United Kingdom
Norway
Portugal
Sweden
Luxembourg
Denmark
Austria
Finland
France
Spain
Cyprus
Switzerland
Greece
Iceland
Germany
Yugoslavia
Contestants
Italy567101262478
Israel5017325557537
Ireland21733242
Netherlands4510331447616
Turkey514
Belgium135521
United Kingdom1306747112121012186121022126
Norway3022582641
Portugal39421376286
Sweden1106648861212258382812
Luxembourg853
Denmark11151101264101021237126101
Austria97128312741210812855
Finland761086101443107310
France6035645183537523
Spain888277410884101010
Cyprus5123166824712
Switzerland474410883217
Greece561156101412124
Iceland0
Germany4672515671633
Yugoslavia1371212812101274851010735561

12 points

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N.ContestantNation(s) giving 12 points
5Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom Flag of France.svg  France , Flag of Germany.svg  Germany , Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg , Flag of Norway.svg  Norway , Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
4Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland , Flag of Israel.svg  Israel , Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey , Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom
3Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium , Flag of Greece.svg  Greece , Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Flag of Finland.svg  Finland , Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands , Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Austria.svg  Austria , Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark , Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia
2Flag of Greece.svg  Greece Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus , Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg  Switzerland
1Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Flag of Spain.svg  Spain

Spokespersons

Each country announced their votes in the order of performance. The following is a list of spokespersons who announced the votes for their respective country.

Broadcasts

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating member broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers. [14] Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
CountryBroadcasterChannel(s)Commentator(s)Ref(s)
Flag of Austria.svg Austria ORF FS1 Ernst Grissemann [15] [16] [17]
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Belgium BRT TV1 Luc Appermont [18] [19]
BRT 2 Ann Lepère
RTBF RTBF1 Jacques Mercier [19] [20]
Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg Cyprus RIK RIK Neophytos Taliotis [21] [22]
Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark DR DR TV Jørgen de Mylius [23] [24]
DR P3 Kurt Helge Andersen
Flag of Finland.svg Finland YLE TV1, 2-verkko  [ fi ] Heikki Harma [25] [26] [27]
Flag of France.svg France Antenne 2 Lionel Cassan  [ fr ] [28] [29]
Flag of Germany.svg Germany ARD Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen Thomas Gottschalk [16] [19] [30]
Flag of Greece.svg Greece ERT ET1 Dafni Bokota [31] [32] [33]
Flag of Iceland.svg Iceland RÚV Sjónvarpið , Rás 1 Arthúr Björgvin Bollason [34] [35] [13]
Flag of Ireland.svg Ireland RTÉ RTÉ 1 Ronan Collins and Michelle Rocca [36] [37] [38]
RTÉ Radio 1 Larry Gogan
Flag of Israel.svg Israel IBA Israeli Television Unknown [39] [40]
Reshet Gimel  [ he ]Unknown
Flag of Italy.svg Italy RAI Rai Uno [lower-alpha 1] Gabriella Carlucci  [ it ] [41] [42]
Flag of Luxembourg.svg Luxembourg CLT RTL Télévision Unknown [43]
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands NOS Nederland 3 Willem van Beusekom [19] [44]
Flag of Norway.svg Norway NRK NRK Fjernsynet , NRK P2 John Andreassen [45] [46] [47]
Flag of Portugal.svg Portugal RTP RTP Canal 1 Unknown [48] [49]
Flag of Spain.svg Spain TVE TVE 2 Tomás Fernando Flores  [ es ] [50] [51]
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden SVT Kanal 1 Jacob Dahlin [12] [26] [46] [52]
RR  [ sv ] SR P3 Kent Finell and Janeric Sundquist [12]
Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Switzerland SRG SSR TV DRS Bernard Thurnheer  [ de ] [16] [29] [53] [54]
TSR Thierry Masselot
TSI [lower-alpha 2] Giovanni Bertini
Flag of Turkey.svg Turkey TRT TV1 Unknown [55] [56]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg United Kingdom BBC BBC1 Terry Wogan [6] [57] [58] [59]
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Yugoslavia JRT TV Ljubljana 1  [ sl ]Unknown [60] [61] [62] [63]
TV Zagreb 1 Oliver Mlakar
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
CountryBroadcasterChannel(s)Commentator(s)Ref(s)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia SBS SBS TV [lower-alpha 3] Unknown [64]
Flag of Poland.svg Poland TP TP1 [lower-alpha 4] Unknown [65]
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Soviet Union ETV Unknown [26] [66]
CT USSR Programme One Unknown

See also

Notes

  1. Deferred broadcast at 23:10 CEST (21:10 UTC) [41]
  2. Broadcast through a second audio programme on TSR [16]
  3. Deferred broadcast on 7 May at 20:30 AEST (10:30 UTC) [64]
  4. Delayed broadcast on 20 May 1989 at 20:05 CEST (18:05 UTC) [65]

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