Eutychus

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Paul raiseth Eutychus to life, from Figures de la Bible, 1728. Paul raiseth Eutychus to life.jpg
Paul raiseth Eutychus to life, from Figures de la Bible, 1728.
Not to be confused with Eutychius or the early Christian theologian Eutyches.

Eutychus /ˈjtɪkəs/ was a young man (or a youth) of Troas tended to by St. Paul. Eutychus fell asleep due to the long nature of the discourse Paul was giving, fell from a window out of the three-story building, and died. [1] Paul then embraced him, insisting that he was not dead, and they carried him back upstairs alive; those gathered then had a meal and a long talk which lasted until dawn. This is related in the New Testament book of the Acts of the Apostles 20:7-12.

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Though some (e.g. William Barclay, F. F. Bruce), do not believe that Eutychus died, Wayne Jackson observes the following facts: 1) the author Luke, a physician (Col. 4:14), plainly states that Eutychus was "taken up dead" (Greek : ἤρθη νεκρός, erthe nekros); 2) after Paul embraces Eutychus, he says, "Trouble not yourselves, for his life is in him" (Greek : ἡ γὰρ ψυχὴ αὐτοῦ ἐν αὐτῷ ἐστιν, he gar psuche autou en auto estin), not "still in him" as the Weymouth translation erroneously interprets; 3) Eutychus was then "brought alive" by which the others were "not a little comforted," which words would make no sense if Eutychus had not died; and 4) Luke was fully capable of describing someone as only being "supposedly dead" (Greek : νομισαντες αυτον τεθναναι), as he did of Paul in Acts 14:19, but he did not do so here. [2] However, Eutychus' complete recovery from a three-story fall, regardless of the initial result, and Paul's attendance at the scene of the accident, appears to be the impact of the narrative.

The name Eutychus means "fortunate".

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References

  1. "Bible Gateway passage: Acts 20:7-12 - King James Version". Bible Gateway. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  2. "The Case of Eutychus". Christian Courier. Retrieved 18 April 2018.

Further reading