Evelyn Pierrepont, 2nd Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull

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Arms of Pierrepont: Argent semée of cinquefoils gules, a lion rampant sable

General Evelyn Pierrepont, 2nd Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull, KG (1711 23 September 1773) was an English nobleman and landowner, a member of the House of Lords. He was the only son of William Pierrepont, Earl of Kingston (16921713) and his wife, Rachel Bayntun (16951722).

A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.

Order of the Garter Order of chivalry in England

The Most Noble Order of the Garter is an order of chivalry founded by King Edward III of England in 1348. It is the most senior order of knighthood in the British honours system, outranked in precedence only by the Victoria Cross and the George Cross. The Order of the Garter is dedicated to the image and arms of Saint George, England's patron saint.

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

His paternal grandparents were Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull and his wife Mary Feilding, a daughter of William Feilding, 3rd Earl of Denbigh, while his maternal grandparents were Elizabeth Willoughby and her husband Thomas Bayntun of Little Chalfield, Wiltshire, or else her lover John Hall of Bradford-on-Avon. He succeeded his grandfather in 1726, inheriting the Thoresby estate in Nottinghamshire.

Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull English nobleman and politician

Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull was an English aristocrat.

William Feilding, 3rd Earl of Denbigh, 2nd Earl of Desmond was an aristocrat in the Peerage of England. He was the son of George Feilding, 1st Earl of Desmond, and his wife, the former Bridget Stanhope, daughter of Sir Michael Stanhope.

Bradford-on-Avon Town in Wiltshire, England, UK

Bradford-on-Avon is a town and civil parish in west Wiltshire, England, with a population of 9,402 at the 2011 census. The town's canal, historic buildings, shops, pubs and restaurants make it popular with tourists.

When the Jacobite rising of 1745 broke out he raised a regiment called "Kingston's light horse," which distinguished itself at the Battle of Culloden. The duke attained the rank of general in the army. [1]

Jacobite rising of 1745 attempt by Charles Edward Stuart to regain the British throne for the exiled House of Stuart

The Jacobite rising of 1745, also known as the Forty-five Rebellion or simply the '45, was an attempt by Charles Edward Stuart to regain the British throne for his father, James Francis Edward Stuart. It took place during the War of the Austrian Succession, when the bulk of the British Army was fighting in mainland Europe, and proved to be the last in a series of revolts that began in 1689, with major outbreaks in 1708, 1715 and 1719.

The Duke of Kingston's Regiment of Light Horse was a volunteer cavalry regiment raised in Nottinghamshire in 1745 by the Duke at his own expense, in imitation of hussars in foreign service, and disbanded in 1746.

Battle of Culloden Final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745

The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart were decisively defeated by Hanoverian forces commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands.

Pierrepont was the subject of the earliest extant reference to cricket in Nottinghamshire. A letter dated 1751 comments that: "the Duke of Kingston at Thoresby Hall is spending all his time practising cricket because he is to play for Eton v All England in three matches". [2]

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

On 8 March 1769, Pierrepont married Elizabeth Hervey at Keith's Chapel in the parish of St George's, Hanover Square, Westminster, although their marriage was later alleged to have been bigamous. [3] He died in 1773 without issue, and Pierrepont's titles became extinct. On the death of the Duchess in 1788, the Pierrepont estates passed to Charles Medows, who was the son of the 2nd Duke's sister, Lady Frances Medows. Charles Medows changed his name to Pierrepont in 1796 and, in 1806, he was created the first Earl Manvers. [4]

Keith's Chapel also known as Mr Keith's Chapel and the May Fair Chapel, was a private chapel in Curzon Street, Mayfair, London, operated by the 18th century Church of England clergyman Alexander Keith.

Westminster area of central London, within the City of Westminster

Westminster is a government district and former capital of the Kingdom of England in Central London within the City of Westminster, part of the West End, on the north bank of the River Thames. Westminster's concentration of visitor attractions and historic landmarks, one of the highest in London, includes the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral.

Bigamy illegal second or further marriage

In cultures where monogamy is mandated, bigamy is the act of entering into a marriage with one person while still legally married to another. A legal or de facto separation of the couple does not alter their marital status as married persons. In the case of a person in the process of divorcing his or her spouse, that person is taken to be legally married until such time as the divorce becomes final or absolute under the law of the relevant jurisdiction. Bigamy laws do not apply to couples in a de facto or cohabitation relationship, or that enter such relationships when one is legally married. If the prior marriage is for any reason void, the couple is not married, and hence each party is free to marry another without falling foul of the bigamy laws.

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Thoresby Hall is a grade I listed 19th-century country house in Budby, Nottinghamshire, some 2 miles north of Ollerton. It is one of four neighbouring country houses and estates in the Dukeries in north Nottinghamshire all occupied by dukes at one time during their history. The hall is constructed of rock-faced ashlar with ashlar dressings. It is built in four storeys with a square floor plan surrounding a central courtyard, nine bays wide and eight bays deep.

The Recorder of Nottingham is the highest appointed legal officer of the Crown within the Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire County areas.

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Robert Pierrepont, 3rd Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull English peer

Robert Pierrepont, 3rd Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull was an English peer.

References

  1. Wikisource-logo.svg One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Kingston-upon-Hull, Earls and Dukes of". Encyclopædia Britannica . 15 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 821–822.
  2. Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club [ permanent dead link ]
  3. She was said to have secretly married Augustus Hervey, 3rd Earl of Bristol in 1744.
  4. Chisholm 1911.
Political offices
Preceded by
New office
Master of the Staghounds
1738–1744
Succeeded by
Lord Robert Manners-Sutton
Military offices
Preceded by
Regiment raised
Colonel of the Duke of Kingston's Regiment of Horse
1745–1746
Succeeded by
Regiment disbanded
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Lord Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire
1763–1765
Succeeded by
The Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Evelyn Pierrepont
Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull
1726–1773
Extinct
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Evelyn Pierrepont
Marquess of Dorchester
1726–1773
Extinct